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Best quality/price suit

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by DuxMux, Sep 28, 2004.

  1. DuxMux

    DuxMux New Member

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    From your experience what is your best quality/price suit?
     
  2. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    That is a question that is far too vague. What price range, what material, what setting will it be used in, etc... These issues need to be addressed before that question can be answered.
     
  3. DuxMux

    DuxMux New Member

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    Price range about 800$-1200$.
    Material: wool super100.
    I'm not sure what you mean by "setting" ?
     
  4. jcusey

    jcusey Well-Known Member

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    He wants to know what you'll be doing when you wear this suit. Are you an investment banker? An advertising exec? A trendoid? The answer will dictate the advice that you get.
     
  5. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    Setting: Business vs formal vs evening (going out) etc...

    For $800-1200 you can buy any number of different high quality suits if you go the ebay or discounter route. Some good choices in the $400-600 price range would be Corelliani or Canali. Some good choices in the $750-900 price range may be Belvest, Oxxford, or Isaia. In the $1000-1400 price range, you may able to find Barbera, Attolini, Brioni, Borrelli, or St. Andrew.

    At full retail, you're limited to Canali or Corelliani for RTW, you could also go the WW Chan route for MTM.
     
  6. DuxMux

    DuxMux New Member

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    Sorry for the misunderstanding.
    I was a computer programmer for about 10 years. I used to wear only t-shirt and jeans. But now i'm promote as director of the computing department so i have to report to some big bosses. I was told to upgraded my wardrobe. I saw at Harry Rosen some Canali suit but i found the "cut" a bit old.

    I saw at Ogilvy in Montreal a couple of nice suits at about 500$ i think the name was "Aquascutum". Maybe it's the kind of suit to start with for a beginner?
     
  7. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    Aquascetum is a decent suit maker, their suits do have canvas fronts in most cases. I find it interesting that you think Canali suits are old, perhaps it was the cut of the suit that you were looking at, as Acqascetum would seem to be older to me.

    Again, I recommend looking at Corneliani, or some similar brands if you want something somewhat young looking but stylish and high quality, that is fairly affordable. These are $1200 suits at retail and can be found at discounters for $300 and ebay for $100-200.
     
  8. Rabbi Mark

    Rabbi Mark Well-Known Member

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    custom, custom, custom. Once you shrug into a suit made expressly for you and have that Ahhhh ... feeling, you'll never go back. Even if the fabric is below standard, getting the fit done right and the hang just so is worth it.

    I have one suit made by a tailor in Romania (he's done three suits plus another three or four jackets for me) that was made from this totally disgusting navy blue fabric, 50-50 poly-wool I think, the same fabric from which the Romania Railroad conductors have their uniforms made. But every time I wear it I get a complement on how fantastic it fits, how great the cut is, etc.

    It's not hard to find a custom tailor in the $500-$800 range. Yes, more expensive than stuff off the rack on sale, etc., but even a mediocre custom suit will (a) last a lot longer and (b) fit a million times better.

    Go for a conservative grey or navy and jazz it up with color in the shirts and ties. But most of all, use your clothing to express yourself. Have fun with it.
     
  9. housemaidsknee

    housemaidsknee Well-Known Member

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    i don't know about (a).
     
  10. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    Some people don't need to get a custom suit as their body type dictates that RTW will fit them more or less perfectly with minor alterations. I am one of these people and have no reason to wear a bespoke or MTM suit. Also, bespoke suits do not always fit well the first time that you have them created unless you know exactly what you want and they are time consuming to purchase. Any bespoke suit for $600-800 is likely going to be low quality and I would have serious questions about the fit as well. That's just a terrible recommendation for someone getting their first suit.
     
  11. retronotmetro

    retronotmetro Well-Known Member

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    I have had zero problems--fit or quality--with WW Chan's custom work at that price range.

    I should add, their first suit had the gorge a little lower than I like, but nothing out of proportion and I get lots of compliments on the suit. Subsequent suits were dead-on.
     
  12. Steve B.

    Steve B. Well-Known Member

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    If you're more traditionally inclined (which I'm not sure you are), you can add Hickey-Freeman, Coppley, and Samuelsohn to the list.
     
  13. Alias

    Alias Well-Known Member

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    Just chiming in to say that the RTW route may be better for you. Going bespoke (or "custom") is an option, but that's something you might not want to try until you get a little more experience with your updated wardrobe.
     
  14. Thracozaag

    Thracozaag Well-Known Member

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    Just as I would not advise a beginning pianist to get a Steinway D, I would advise a LOT of education and study before embarking on a custom suit. I finally, after three years, feel adequately prepared to know precisely what I want with regards to a custom suit.

    koji
     
  15. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member

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    a) depends on the material. An off the rack, crap suit in a super 100 wool or super 80's (does this even exist anymore?) will be a lot more hardwearing than that Super 130 and cashmere blend custom job.
     
  16. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    I was under the impression that WW Chan was MTM rather than true bespoke so they were based on some sort of template where bespoke would be more of a blank template... a beginner would likely not know what they wanted when it came to a bespoke suit.
     
  17. retronotmetro

    retronotmetro Well-Known Member

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    I think this gets into the finer (and maybe unanswerable to the satisfaction of all) semantic point of what constitutes MTM vs bespoke vs custom. My understanding of MTM is that it is a process of altering a stock pattern to a customer's measurements, with the existing pattern being a constraint on the final product. My understanding of bespoke is that it is a multi-fitting process that takes into account nuances of posture and form, is not constrained by an existing pattern, and lets the customer specify a broad range of details. Custom (to me) falls in the middle of this continuum.

    My understanding of the way WW Chan works is that they use the customer's measurements to build a suit, but are not necessarily constrained by a preexisting pattern, which allows them to provide greater variability in the styles and adjustments they put into a final product. At least by the definitions I know, that is more than MTM and less than bespoke. Some people on the forum have described their work in HK (multiple fittings and adjustments) as bespoke, and their work on US visits (single measuring session, alterations possible on later visits) as MTM. I don't know how accurate a dichotomy that is. I certainly know that I've yet to set foot in their HK shop, but my suits are as well-constructed and well-fitting as the suit my friend got in HK, with two post-measurement fittings.
     
  18. Downtowner

    Downtowner Active Member

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    No, I believe WW Chan is true bespoke.  They start by creating a paper pattern for you and are not limited by existing "models" as are MTM.  The price is less than one would pay for MTM at, say, Barney's because labor costs are much lower and there is not the same spend on advertising, overheads, etc.

    In the end, while I would agree with earlier posters that a poorly made custom suit is a bad investment in the abstract, because a tailor is actually taking your measurements and ostensibly making the suit just for you, it seems more likely that you will get a better fit than by buying off the rack.  Buying off the rack, it is highly unlikely that you will get a perfect fit of all your dimensions and you will have to place yourself in the hands of a local tailor to do alterations that may or may not work out as you expected.  Even if your "custom" suit needs to be altered because of improper execution, at least from the outset it will generally (although not always) more closely fit your dimensions than an OTR suit.  As other posters have noted, if you look at some Hong Kong custom suits as works in progress when delivered, potentially needing further local tweaking, then one would expect the fit to be a lot better than OTR, potentially, unless you just happen to find that suitmaker that fits you perfectly.

    While many have praised certain suit brands on this board for their wonderful construction, the fact remains that if the suits do not fit the wearer properly, they will look decidedly subpar, despite their construction.  Certain photos posted on this board and AA (I will not name names) illustrate this proposition.

    As an addendum, many hong kong tailors charge $600-800 for a suit and they are not terrible quality by any means (in fact, some are quite a bit nicer than $1500 suits I've seen in Barneys, etc.).  So to suggest that it is a bad idea to go this route is ill-informed.
     
  19. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    I think it really depends. One thing that seems obvious is that unless you are buying an OTR suit from ebay or an online retailer, that you are going to try the item on, and know the fit. While some individuals with different body types (most likely, bigger or smaller drop than the manufacturer anticipated) will have issues, some people can wear RTW suits w/o issues.

    The only alterations that I normally have to have done on RTW suits is inseam length and potentially taking in the waist of the pants, which isn't a big deal IMO. Most RTW jackets fit me perfectly, as I have almost perfect proportions of a 44R (32-33" length from collar down, 46-47" chest, 20-21" shoulders, 24-25" sleeve length) and it is just necessary to find a suit that has the right measurements, the right fabric, and the right look for me. While I think WW Chan is a great deal for the price, I have purchased four suits and their alterations (1 Brioni, 2 Belvest, 1 Oxxford) for the same price as a WW Chan suit, and IMO the fits are great.
     
  20. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    My issue with a custom suit for a first time suit buyer is that he doesn't know what he wants, why else would he post here to ask? Therefore, if he goes the custom route, he will get whatever the creator THINKS he wants, or maybe what they think may be the best suit for him. While this may not be a bad situation, I would advise going the RTW route unless it's really necessary (unusual body type, want choices of specific, hard-to-get fabrics, want very specific features) to go MTM/bespoke.
     

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