1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

Austro-Hungarian school of shoemaking

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by fritzl, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    Mr. Kiss is the Master of the Wiener Leisten for me. These shoes are built for eternity.

    The Reiter is a thrift find. I'm supposed it is more than twenty years old.

    The fake exotic hide was a gift and I thought it adds a little twist to the whole story.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    different soles:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
  4. fra

    fra Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    88
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2007
    Hi Fritzl, I notice nailing in the soles runs up to the toe of the shoes....Is it coupled with a welt stitching? Fra
     
  5. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    Hi Fritzl, I notice nailing in the soles runs up to the toe of the shoes....Is it coupled with a welt stitching? Fra

    If I got the question right. Maftei does it for sure, so would I say for the other three "mester".
     
  6. dopey

    dopey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,577
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2006
    Thanks again. I am glad for the opportunity to see these.
     
  7. nmoraitis

    nmoraitis Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    948
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Location:
    Upper Canada
    wow! these are real blind mans shoe's!

    Fixed
     
  8. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    This is "another" shoe for a summer resort like the Salzkammergut.

    The model "Slatin Pasha" named after Freiherr Karl Rudolf von Slatin, who spent his summer holidays here.

    Queen Victoria put her trust in the Austrian officer Karl Rudolf of Slatin, who was the governor of Sudan. In 1897 he bought the "Spitzvilla" in Traunkirchen, where he welcomed King Eduard VII, emperor Franz Josef, and many other well known people.

    Mine are a special interpretation, spotting a Goyserer welt. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
  10. Eustace Tilley

    Eustace Tilley Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,452
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Location:
    New York
    I like the FÃ[​IMG]her and the first pair of the Kovacs.
     
  11. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    A special twist on a traditional style.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  12. janne melkersson

    janne melkersson Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    131
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    Hara, Sweden
    Fritzl,
    thank you for posting this survey over the Austrian-Hungarian school of shoe making. Very interesting!
    I have not much experience of this school but I will learn more about the Goyserer welt technique this summer. Marcell will be the instructor for a seminar of this method in July in my shop.
    My grandfather made many pair using a similar method (called pitch seamed in Swedish) 1925-1945 for farmers. No fancy shoes but heavy boots.
    Thanks for sharing,
    Janne
     
  13. luk-cha

    luk-cha Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,534
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Location:
    Was Sinndom, Now is Rolexdom
    Fixed

    i dont think so, i like them for what they are! can't sleep with super modals all the time!
     
  14. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,384
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    We have been introduced to "Cipesz mester" Kovacs by the last maker Kalman Berta.

    Mr. Kovacs is already retired after having a heart attack.

    Interesting shoes. Some I like and some I do not, but the ones in this post are just awesome.

    Thanks for the pics.
     
  15. T4phage

    T4phage Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,117
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2003
    Location:
    sage
    I can really see the Eastern European aesthetic with the connotations implied by it.
     
  16. Jerome

    Jerome Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,187
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    Location:
    Central Europe
    Extreme coolness IIT! Thanks fritzl for showing and your expertise; I like especially that speckled Norwegian one in e.g. post #10...as the Austro-Hungarian style as a whole.

    p.s./edit: I know its not the same (high) "category" but I just bought a pair of shoes by Laszlo Sacher, today. Yet they come from that tradition as well...
    http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...postcount=3031
    Still you made me curious about the Maftei ones too and I'll probably check out that shop too. J.
     
  17. grimslade

    grimslade Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,875
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Location:
    Back in Black
    Unfortunately this shoe had to suffer a lot. That's life.

    Interesting, fritzl. Thanks for posting them. It probably won't surprise you that I like these, well worn and somewhat conventional, best of the lot.

    What size shoe do you wear, if I may ask?
     
  18. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    I like the FÃ[​IMG]her and the first pair of the Kovacs.

    ET, Imagine that Mr. Kovacs, who is heading towards eighty, does not speak and understand any German word. I dunno speak or understand the Hungarian language. We worked over the VASS book, an old Ludwig Reiter catalogue(standard in the small workshops[​IMG] ) and sign language.

    No try on shoe, no fitting. When I returned to him, I slipped into them. I took them, broke them in and no tweaking required. That's all.

    I understand, that this is a completely different experience compared to the big numbers. Hmmh, at the end of the day the result counts.

    Feher speaks German fluently. He is a bit crazy in a good way. I hope Marcell will be so kind and makes an excerpt of the article on the Hungarian site, so we can share it.

    His shoes are sort of stiff. If you sort them out of the rotation, you have to "break them in" again. Today, I am wearing the burgundy wingtip. A snug fit. Each of them has his own character.
    A little bit pathetic, but these are my personal thoughts on these shoes.

    Understood that there was no try on shoe and additional fitting with Mr. Feher and Mr. Kiss.
    Albeit there was a development in the concerted work on the result due to the language.

    I am not able to do a rating between them, due to their uniqueness. All in common is the great craftmanship and the passion for their product. Unfortunately, Mr. Kovacs is already retired after his heart attack, they are at an age, where you have to say "goodbye".
     
  19. MarcellHUN

    MarcellHUN Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    583
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    I try to do, what I can (My English is poor, so it will be a good game to find out, what I wanted to say.. [​IMG] sorry for that) If someone correct it and send me a PM with the text I promise to replace it.. Until you have to deal with it.

    The article:
    http://www.kisalfold.hu/gyori_hirek/...ipesz/2041213/

    And my translation:

    "what a carrier! - we could say if a craftsman could get a university degree and became a research-engineer.. But in this case the opposite happened. Istvan Feher did that - maybe he is the only one with it.

    The elder Feher got his master degree for 80 years as a bootmaker. He had 5-6 employee in his shop at Szechenyi ter. They produces shoes (every step of it, from lastmaking to finish) and sold it in the weekends. Many people of the family became bootmaker - just like his younger brother, who is 91 yrs old, and lives in Pannonhalma. Istvan started to learn at Bercsenyi Primary School then went to gymnasium, then finally went to Veszprem University "petrol-chemistry". He started to work, but one day went back to his father to learn shoemaking.

    - why did you choose this? - we asked.

    (explanation about the economical situation of Hungary that time...)

    - Because of money.. - he makes shoes for 25 years and happy with it. He was familiar with the basics, so it wasn't so hard to learn. He and his father could work together 4-5 years before he passed. He doesn't accept new shoe orders anymore - even if someone would pay for it. He made shoe for Javor Pal (very famous Hungarian actor, died in 1959 - see picture)

    [​IMG]

    None of Istvan's children learnt the craft.

    - do your customer knows, that you are an engineer?
    - maybe at the beginning they did."

    Thats it. I hope you can understand.
     
  20. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,299
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Gmunden, Salzkammergut, Austria
    Interesting, fritzl. Thanks for posting them. It probably won't surprise you that I like these, well worn and somewhat conventional, best of the lot.

    What size shoe do you wear, if I may ask?


    Grims, I am around a US 10.5.

    Feher shoes are close to size. My first set of shoe trees from Kalman Berta was marked EU 43, and was from the standard collection. I use them for the Feher and the Twin pair of Kiss.

    For the second set, I was measured by him and it is marked EU 44. I couldn't convince him not to mark lasted trees [​IMG]

    The LR(brown blucher, straight cap w medaillon) migt be an US 11. As you know, every thing is about the fit of the heel and the arch. So they are roomy in the toe box and i do not mind the extra creasing on a thrift find.

    PS: I am not surprised after seeing your Scafora's. Different stroke, but you know. I am more surprised, that most of the fora shoe experts are holding back in a noble manner [​IMG]
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by