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Australian Members

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by earthdragon, Nov 18, 2008.

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  1. CHECKstar

    CHECKstar Well-Known Member

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    I have been thinking about this recently – I worked for 5 years in retail customer service for a major retail chain when studying, and quite enjoyed it (it matched my personality). I think a big issue with customer service in retailers is the care factor, which can be quite low for those who are unmotivated to provide service. I always thought that if, one day, I owned or ran a retailer, that I would pay my staff a nominal salary, but make up for it by paying a significant commission on sales.
     
  2. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Well-Known Member

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    ^ well that might motivate them

    I recently went to buy an ipad in one of the chains, due to what I thought would have been timesaving and effective service, but no one wanted to come and serve us. The could clearly see that we were looking over the product and the just stood around and ignored the wife and I, so finally I had to go to up to a desk and interrupt the staff members social call to get some action. Needless to say we just left and went elsewhere.

    Also for years I worked in hospitality, the issue I alway had to contend with was if patronage slacked off or any other issue that arose the first thing management or owners would do is fire the chef, this was a very common occurrence in both Sydney and Melbourne in the early 80's, but the tables have turned and most restauranteurs and cafe owners bemoan the fact that they cant get decent staff. I know from having spoken to a couple of people the situation in Canberra is quite critical as i witnessed the other night at Italian & Son the service from both floor and kitchen staff sucked, wont be going back there.
     
  3. tomee

    tomee Well-Known Member

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    anyone buying from OS since the dollar is looking nice?

    soo tempted just browsing the RL site
     
  4. fxh

    fxh Well-Known Member

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    I posted the above article as it was in the dead tree AGE copy and was much broader and talked about online retail figures etc.

    This article from the online seems to be almost a different article focused on service.

    I'll look later (or someone else can) to see what the difference is.

    I am interested in the retail climate.

    My view is the big chains (some not all) are reaping the rewards of their business model based on ignoring customers on price, variety, quality etc.

    Smaller retailers are doing well from this in many cases.

    One example - DJs, from memory, have "cosmetics" ( this is a broad category) I think used to contribute something like 30% of profit. Amazing.

    Forget online just now. Walk into Chemist Warehouse and check prices for the exact SAME goods, in same packaging, same quality, and requiring no real service or added value..

    $60 EdT in DJs = $29 in Chemist Warehouse across a wide variety of labels.

    This is being repeated elsewhere - online is just a scapegoat at present.
     
  5. fxh

    fxh Well-Known Member

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    Finally, a clearer picture of online shopping July 29, 2011 - 12:18PM

    Hard facts have been much rarer than alarmist claims in the headline war over the impact of online retailing on traditional stores, but the most detailed analysis yet of e-tailing shows online retail growth is actually much faster than previously supposed, the international component smaller and it’s not all about Gen Y.

    The Commonwealth Bank yesterday added a layer of fact to the various guesstimates, consumer surveys and old-school retailers’ broad assertions about online retailing – and now data analytics company Quantium seems to have gone a step further.

    Quantium’s latest offshoot, Quantium Online, run by Simon Smith, the former boss of eBay in Australia, reckons the value of Australian online purchases is rising by 26 per cent a year. That growth is being driven mainly by a 20 per cent annual increase in the number of people shopping online. And the offshore proportion of Australian online shopping is just 20 per cent. Tell that to the “impose GST to save us from foreigners” lobby.

    That last figure is sharply at odds with the 44 per cent finding of the CBA analysis and a PwC/Frost and Sullivan consumer survey projection. The CBA’s 44 per cent came from reviewing its customers credit and debit card spending, but Quantium’s 20 per cent also comes from what bank customers are actually doing.

    Quantium has a deal with an unnamed Big Four bank - obviously not the CBA - that gives real time access to all its customers’ non-cash transactions. That’s more than 1.5 million transactions a day, more than half a billion a year - credit cards, debit cards, BPay, direct credits and debits, everything except folding money and coins. For obvious privacy reasons, customer identification is washed out before Quantium gets hold of the information for its Market Blueprint database, but that still leaves a rich source of hard data on consumers’ spending.

    Quantium says it has developed its own software to filter and mine the database to identify online purchases. It then weights the data for the co-operating bank’s market share and demographic and geographical bias, arguably resulting in the most reliable picture of what is being spent by whom and where. Hard transaction data is of considerably more use than consumer surveys of limited sample size that discover what some people think they do and might do, not what they really do.

    Differences in the CBA and Quantium findings could come from a combination of factors. The CBA analysis only used pure-play online retailers – domestic bricks’n’clicks operations were ignored. According to Quantium, that means leaving out five of the top 20 online operations. While the vast majority of online purchases are settled with a credit or debit card, plenty of eBay merchants encourage direct debit instead. And the CBA analysis was not weighted for the demographic bias of the bank’s customer basis. The CBA has the most customers of any Australian bank, but I suspect it’s overweight at both the younger and older ends of the market.

    Those considerations still leave a big gap between the claimed 20 and 44 per cent foreign numbers, perhaps underlining how even bank transaction records have trouble yielding the full picture. It’s even harder to nail down a figure for the overall size of the online market. Quantium is coy about doing it and CBA analyst Andrew McLennan says the team mining the figures was hesitant as well, but went with $9.5 billion as their best estimate for 2010 spending.

    Having developed Market Blueprint over three years, Quantium now has some surprises about online retailing:
    Of the top 20 online retailers used by Australians, 11 are domestic pure-play online stores, five are bricks’n’clicks, and only four are overseas;
    The turnover of the top 15 domestic pure-play online retailers is now greater than the largest single non-food retailer, Big W;
    Some 40 per cent of online shoppers are aged over 45, while those under 25 account for just 15 per cent of transactions.


    Quantium and the CBA are closer to agreement on the age profile. The CBA report says over 45s make up 35 per cent of the market and use a different age grouping at the younger end, suggesting those under 30 do 28 per cent of the business. The difference could come from the CBA’s figures not being weighted against the population average.

    Whatever the differences in detail, the plight of flailing old-school retailers remains the same. Even taking a midpoint between the Quantium and CBA numbers, online foreigners are not eating the bricks’ lunch when the CBA says total online accounts for only 5.2 per cent of discretionary spending, but Quantium’s growth rate figure is a warning of the need to change tired retail offerings and/or rapidly develop online channels.

    The Market Blueprint figures highlight the rise and rise of Australian-based e-tailing. The likes of dealsdirect.com.au, Graysonline.com, domestic eBay sellers and their peers have grabbed this rapidly growing space while the established retailers were still in online denial.

    The PwC/Frost survey that predicted online shopping would grow by 13 per cent this year indicates consumers themselves are unaware of what they’re spending. Quantium says e-tailing is already growing by double that figure as the number of online shoppers grows by 20 per cent a year.

    Until releasing its data to BusinessDay.com.au, Quantium had adopted a relatively low profile, going about the business of selling analytical services to retailers – the database that fingers online shopping also provides instant feedback on any change in major retailers’ strategies. Now everyone knows: Just like the horseless carriage, electric light and aeroplanes, online retailing is here, growing fast and not about to be curtailed.

    Michael Pascoe is a BusinessDay contributing editor.
     
  6. fxh

    fxh Well-Known Member

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    Still not the article I was after
     
  7. fxh

    fxh Well-Known Member

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    In the Fin Review Myers is announcing a big cull of middle management and Myer shares are down 33% since January. "..managing cost and focusing on service..."

    DJs is cutting back on discounting after worst slump in 20 years. "Prices in June July were cut 30% to 70% but consumers stayed away"

    Analysts say department stores have been losing market share to specialty retailers for years.

    me:: Online information is part of this but also remember Australians are possibly the biggest travellers in the world. People from Australia see what is overseas and react.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
  8. ruzzi

    ruzzi Well-Known Member

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    honestly can't remember the last thing i bought from dj's or myer (other than jocks on sale at xmas time)....must have been 4-5 years ago... this is even though i do go for a walkaround in there about once a month.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
  9. PregnantBob

    PregnantBob Well-Known Member

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    Reaction is definitely the right word.

    With fashion especially, we get the stuff later and we're forced to pay more. If Myer and DJs got their act together i'd still shop there. They have got no one to blame but themselves
     
  10. Simon29

    Simon29 Member

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    Getting my first pair of quality shoes and shopping for my shoe care products (have nothing currently). Does anybody know where to find horsehair brushes in Perth or on Australian online stores?
     
  11. Naka

    Naka Well-Known Member

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    Florsheim sells horsehair brushes for around $20. Dunno if they have a store in Perth though.
     
  12. Simon29

    Simon29 Member

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    THey do - I'll go check them out, saves having to buy online (shipping is a killer). Thanks!
     
  13. blahman

    blahman Well-Known Member

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    I don't use brushes for my shoes. I just use an old t-shirt to do everything calf and an old toothbrush for suede.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2011
  14. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Well-Known Member

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    If memory serves me correct there was an article in the FR last week about why people are staying away from the Myers and DJ's one reason cited is that they have had a gut full of perpetual sales and it appears that these perpetual sales have devalued the brands in the public's eye.

    And speaking of sales Henry Bucks are having a sale in Sydney last time I picked up a couple of Robert Talbott ties very cheap and the FR Magazine has an insert on watches very nice assortment of eye candy.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2011
  15. blahman

    blahman Well-Known Member

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    ^^^ You say cheap, but you got to tell us how cheap. And hows the coat?
     
  16. pharmaboy

    pharmaboy Member

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    Here's an idea that has got me - every time i walk through a shopping centre, nearly every shop has a HUUUUGE red sign out the front with 50%!!!! off - sorry I mean up to 50% off - I know they are running 75% margins on retail, and if it were actually 50% off, then it would be a fair enough deal to pay their rent, staff etc, but I am completely over the up to 50% sign when in reality there's 6 items at deep discount, nd the rest is same old - I've lost the faith in a sale.

    As to the article above and the differences for those that read, the first thing i can think of, is one counted foreign currency transactions as their measure and the other counted transactions with more detail - I buy plenty overseas, and a lot is simply charged in AUD, even though it came from the UK - eg the largest retailers of bike parts in this country are Wiggle and CRC - both can charge you in AUD, both are definately UK based
     
  17. blahman

    blahman Well-Known Member

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    ^^^ I'm very sure they charge you GBP. Your bank or paypal does all the conversion for you.
     
  18. psyc1030

    psyc1030 Well-Known Member

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    you can get some from DJ actually, it is the collonil, rosshaar brush, horsehair in German
     
  19. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Well-Known Member

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    At -3c when I ventured out the other day, today was -8c at 7.30am, the coat is fine it has a wool liner which works a treat. And as for cheap one was $65 for a RT best of class, the good score was a Tino Cosma Luxury Edition for $70 red geometric design marked down from $200.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2011
  20. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday in Canberra DJ's I saw a Sportcraft jumper in a style I liked it was on a rack saying 70% off the price of garments, I looked it was marked down from $139 to $89 I know maths is not my strong point but, anyway took it over to the counter and the price scanned at $89, I pointed out that it came off the rank and male attendant tried to inform me that $89 is 70% of $139. Obliviously as an arts graduate i know nothing of mathematics.
     
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