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Ask A Question, Get An Answer... - Post All Quick Questions Here (Classic menswear)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Master-Classter, Sep 28, 2008.

  1. saraanderson

    saraanderson Member

    Messages:
    10
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    Aug 13, 2009
    I want to know how come sizes are different in different brands. How can our metric system change?
     
  2. toogies80

    toogies80 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    74
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    Jun 17, 2009
    Would anyone be able to tell me if this is the AE park avenue or not. The seller says it is not and that he doesn't know what the name of the shoe is. I'm fairly new to AE shoes but looks like the park avenue to me. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Biggskip

    Biggskip Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,267
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    Believeland
    Would anyone be able to tell me if this is the AE park avenue or not. The seller says it is not and that he doesn't know what the name of the shoe is. I'm fairly new to AE shoes but looks like the park avenue to me. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    Those shoes are bluchers, not balmorals, and therefore not PAs.
     
  4. Biggskip

    Biggskip Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,267
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    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    Believeland
    I am close to pulling the trigger on my first pair of really nice shoes, and I think I've decided on these Alden wingtips http://www.aldenshop.com/DrawOneShoe.asp?CategoryID=35

    I'm planning to just call the Alden store in San Francisco to order them, but am curious if there is anywhere to get a deal/discount on them.


    There isn't a place where you can reliably get Alden's on sale or discount. Here and there you may find a particular model on sale. For the most part Alden has been making the same exact shoes for decades and the styles are timeless so the stock will sell eventually.

    Question from a first time poster!

    I'm a button down fanatic who's just sick of the same old patterns (stripes and spots, some paisleys here and there) that I find everywhere. Yeah, I come across a unique pattern on occasion at the mall or thrift, but otherwise I just can't find anything unique (pattern-wise) without blowing my whole paycheck on a couple shirts. Any tips on where to shop, online or otherwise, in order to get a better selection of "unique" dress shirts? Maybe even a few brands to keep an eye on and where to find them.


    You could try the internet MTM shops like Jantzen or Mytailor.
     
  5. Biggskip

    Biggskip Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,267
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    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    Believeland
    How does one wash a tie?
    You don't. You send it here, and if that doesn't work you send it here.
     
  6. sho'nuff

    sho'nuff Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    22,225
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    Apr 15, 2006
    Location:
    Irvine
    in the courtroom, when you are there as a defendant or plaintiff, is it required for you to wear a suit?
    is a sportcoat and pants just acceptable, common, or incorrect?

    i know the lawyer has to wear a suit.

    thanks.
     
  7. BBSLM

    BBSLM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,750
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2008
    There isn't a place where you can reliably get Alden's on sale or discount. Here and there you may find a particular model on sale. For the most part Alden has been making the same exact shoes for decades and the styles are timeless so the stock will sell eventually.

    Thanks, thats what I thought but I figured I would ask.
     
  8. JAPAN

    JAPAN Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    60
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2009
    My white shoes got stained. How to remove the stain and how to keep white shoes clean and not look yelowish after being used?
     
  9. Biggskip

    Biggskip Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,267
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    Believeland
    My white shoes got stained. How to remove the stain and how to keep white shoes clean and not look yelowish after being used?
    Are we talking suede here? If not, to spot clean you can get one of those hydrogen peroxide in a blotter bottle applications. Those typically work well for the occasional spot.
     
  10. false

    false Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    109
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Navy Zara suit + Sand Suede Desert Boots?
    I'm pretty sure the answer to this is "no". but I figure I should ask anyway. Can I wear my Clarks (sand suede desert boots) with a suit? I've picked up an odd job where I have to ferry women's shoe samples to a distributor's office in Japan and I'm stuck with a really cobbled together set of dress clothes. I have a -too- tight, slim fitting dark navy 2 button suit from Zara and then a choice between horrendus 6 year old chisel toed Rockports, or, my desert boots. I know desert boots are Chukkas which I have seen worn with suits here and elsewhere. Also, I think the sand suede looks nice with the navy suit -certainly better than the damn Rockports. I'm scouring the forums to pick up some better shoes but in the meantime, should I do it? I don't want to go into a fashion distributors office in Shibuya wearing Rockports and look like a schlub but are desert boots and a suit a major faux pas?
     
  11. videogeek

    videogeek Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    212
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2009
    Sizing on jackets and suits... will American sizing always have an R or L designation like 42R? I realize looking at actual measurements helps, but I don't want to get confused between European and American sizes. Also, a 42R would be equivalent to a European 52 right?
     
  12. Rosenberg

    Rosenberg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,404
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Location:
    TX
    Navy Zara suit + Sand Suede Desert Boots?
    I'm pretty sure the answer to this is "no". but I figure I should ask anyway. Can I wear my Clarks (sand suede desert boots) with a suit? I've picked up an odd job where I have to ferry women's shoe samples to a distributor's office in Japan and I'm stuck with a really cobbled together set of dress clothes. I have a -too- tight, slim fitting dark navy 2 button suit from Zara and then a choice between horrendus 6 year old chisel toed Rockports, or, my desert boots. I know desert boots are Chukkas which I have seen worn with suits here and elsewhere. Also, I think the sand suede looks nice with the navy suit -certainly better than the damn Rockports. I'm scouring the forums to pick up some better shoes but in the meantime, should I do it? I don't want to go into a fashion distributors office in Shibuya wearing Rockports and look like a schlub but are desert boots and a suit a major faux pas?


    i guess it depends on the degree to which you're expected to "dress up." desert boots really arent a "dress shoe", but if you dont have to dress board room exec style i'd for sure go with them over anything clunky. especially with a slim suit
     
  13. ennui

    ennui Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    801
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2008
    Location:
    U.S.A.
    More details please... You mean on the outside of the lapels, like pick stitching? Or underneath/behind the lapels, and only on "one side" (you mean just the outside of each, or only on one of the lapels?)

    I wish I had the suit here, but it's being altered right now so I cannot take pictures. It's not on the lapel itself. It's definitely a straight stitch that runs at a slant only on the left side, from behind the lapel to between the buttons on a two-button jacket. It looks intentional, and is unnoticeable from more than a foot away or so, but is on the outside of the jacket. I don't have this on any of my other jackets, but then again my wardrobe is currently low-end so what do I know?
     
  14. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    25,756
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    Jan 18, 2007
    Most quality jackets are lined in a material called "bemberg."

    Do any of you know if Despos will make the whole suit from just bemberg? Or maybe bemberg with an ermazine lining.

    Thank you.


    - B
     
  15. niidawg3

    niidawg3 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,495
    Joined:
    May 26, 2009
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Most quality jackets are lined in a material called "bemberg."

    Do any of you know if Despos will make the whole suit from just bemberg? Or maybe bemberg with an ermazine lining.

    Thank you.


    - B


    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    man - you are pure comedy.
     
  16. sho'nuff

    sho'nuff Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    22,225
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    Apr 15, 2006
    Location:
    Irvine
    i never understood this:

    what is the difference between woolen flannel and just plain flannel? i thought flannel was automatically considered woolen?

    and worsted is not a flannel. can someone clear this up for me i tried researching and found nothing but just people's opinions on their preferences here and nothing on the web.
     
  17. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    25,756
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    i never understood this:

    what is the difference between woolen flannel and just plain flannel? i thought flannel was automatically considered woolen?

    and worsted is not a flannel. can someone clear this up for me i tried researching and found nothing but just people's opinions on their preferences here and nothing on the web.


    This was on the StyleForvm Senior Member Test:

    "Woolen", basically means that the individual fibers of varying lengths are going in many different directions, overlapping each other at a variety of angles and leaving air spaces between the individual fibers. "Worsted" means that the individual fibers are roughly the same length and are running parallel to each other and only overlapping at the tips, leaving little to no space between the individual fibers.

    "Worsted" refers to the way the fiber is prepared before spinning, using gilling machines which force the fiber staples to lie parallel to each other. Once these fibers have been made into a top, they are then combed to remove the short fibers. The long fibers are combined in subsequent gilling machines to again make the fibers parallel. This produces overlapping untwisted strands called slivers. Worsted spinning refers to using a worsted technique, which produces a smooth yarn where the fibers lie parallel.

    This used to be an essay question for Senior Member status, but I think it is multiple choice question in these troubled and lesser times.


    - B
     
  18. dv3

    dv3 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,074
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    This was on the StyleForvm Senior Member Test:

    "Woolen", basically means that the individual fibers of varying lengths are going in many different directions, overlapping each other at a variety of angles and leaving air spaces between the individual fibers. "Worsted" means that the individual fibers are roughly the same length and are running parallel to each other and only overlapping at the tips, leaving little to no space between the individual fibers.

    "Worsted" refers to the way the fiber is prepared before spinning, using gilling machines which force the fiber staples to lie parallel to each other. Once these fibers have been made into a top, they are then combed to remove the short fibers. The long fibers are combined in subsequent gilling machines to again make the fibers parallel. This produces overlapping untwisted strands called slivers. Worsted spinning refers to using a worsted technique, which produces a smooth yarn where the fibers lie parallel.

    This used to be an essay question for Senior Member status, but I think it is multiple choice question in these troubled and lesser times.


    - B


    On my test I had two words on the left of the page and two detailed pictures of fabric. I then had to draw a line from the word to the correct picture. Unfortunately I am near 100% illitirite so I had to guess what the words meant.
     
  19. sho'nuff

    sho'nuff Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    22,225
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Location:
    Irvine
    This was on the StyleForvm Senior Member Test:

    "Woolen", basically means that the individual fibers of varying lengths are going in many different directions, overlapping each other at a variety of angles and leaving air spaces between the individual fibers. "Worsted" means that the individual fibers are roughly the same length and are running parallel to each other and only overlapping at the tips, leaving little to no space between the individual fibers.

    "Worsted" refers to the way the fiber is prepared before spinning, using gilling machines which force the fiber staples to lie parallel to each other. Once these fibers have been made into a top, they are then combed to remove the short fibers. The long fibers are combined in subsequent gilling machines to again make the fibers parallel. This produces overlapping untwisted strands called slivers. Worsted spinning refers to using a worsted technique, which produces a smooth yarn where the fibers lie parallel.

    This used to be an essay question for Senior Member status, but I think it is multiple choice question in these troubled and lesser times.


    - B


    thanks , i understand that. i know that worsted is the type of fiber/prepared fiber (longer strands, parallel ) used in a variety of twills.
    and that
    woolen is a mishmash of fibers going all over the place.

    that is what i thought flannel was:

    flannel = woolen

    but then i hear people talking about

    "woolen flannel"
    and
    "worsted flannel"

    i thought flannel was a mishmash of fibers so there would be no such thing as worsted flannel.

    and
    that woolen flannel is just a redundant term.
     
  20. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    25,756
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    i thought flannel was a mishmash of fibers so there would be no such thing as worsted flannel.

    There is. I'm having two suits made up now in worsted flannel.

    Per Mantoni:

    "Worsted flannel is cloth with a worsted base. That is, in the guts of the cloth, the yarns are combed out straight and woven in a parallel/perpendicular lines, giving the cloth greater density and resilience. Usually, this base is a twill weave. But not all the yarns are combed out flat and straight. Some are left to cross this way and that, and lock into place haphazardly. Plus, the cloth is not finished in the same way as a true worsted. The result is a cloth in which, if you look closely, you can see the twill weave, but the surface also has a visible nap, or fuzziness. True woolen flannel will have no combed yarns at all, and no twill (or any other regular pattern) to the weave. It will look "mottled", especially if the yarns are of varying colors (as they almost always are).

    "Worsted flannel will wear better, hold a crease better, resist wrinkles better, and last longer. Woolen flannel is softer and in some respects more interesting cloth. The "depth" and color variation is simply not achievable any other way. It is more of luxury, because it is not so hard-wearing and won't last as long. It is also much more rare. I can't remember the last time I saw a real woolen flannel made RTW. I think it's pretty much a bespoke-only cloth these days.

    "Lesser does indeed make (or sell, more precisely) terrific worsted flannels. The best woolens currently in the books are, in my opinion, sold by Minnis and Harrison's."

    So, odds are, what you know as flannel is worsted flannel, not woolen flannel.


    - B
     

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