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Art

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by SoCal2NYC, Jun 15, 2007.

  1. StephenHero

    StephenHero Well-Known Member

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    I saw most of it. A very interesting life, but his work does absolutely nothing for me... he is (unfairly to him of course) so easy to lump in the group of 'you're a sheep and a fucking liar if you pretend to act like this is exceptional art and you get it' artists.

    My favorite art critic, Robert Hughes, has spent half of his career trying to relegate Basquiat to the D-list of the art world to little success. I agree with almost everything he says, but I'm still subjectively drawn to his use of color.

     
  2. mordecai

    mordecai Well-Known Member

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    My favorite art critic, Robert Hughes,

    OJFC
     
  3. StephenHero

    StephenHero Well-Known Member

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    OJFC
    Love him. I was reading out of Shock of the New last night. [​IMG]
     
  4. mordecai

    mordecai Well-Known Member

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    Love him. I was reading out of Shock of the New last night. [​IMG]
    I like some of his writing/programs, but by how wide of a margin did he beat Sister Wendy to become your favorite?
     
  5. StephenHero

    StephenHero Well-Known Member

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    He surpassed her when he called Julian Schnabel "the broken plate guy".
     
  6. mordecai

    mordecai Well-Known Member

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    He surpassed her when he called Julian Schnabel "the broken plate guy".
    I credit him for that, and for hating Basquiat, Salle, and Koons. The irony is that his writing often mirrors some of the thought behind what Foster and Jameson referred to as Neoconservative Postmodernism, the most iconic proponent of which was for them (and much of the academic art world) Julian Schnabel. Many would say that Schnabel and Hughes's thinking is not that different, Hughes just doesn't like Schnabel's work, and as is often the case with critics, tailors his ideas to the goal of dismissing that which he dislikes visually. Cool starry bra.
     
  7. StephenHero

    StephenHero Well-Known Member

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    Neoconservative Postmodernism
    That term is hard to comprehend. I have no idea what they're using it to describe.
    Many would say that Schnabel and Hughes's thinking is not that different, Hughes just doesn't like Schnabel's work, and as is often the case with critics, tailors his ideas to the goal of dismissing that which he dislikes visually.
    I often do the same, unapologetically. I don't think it's bad to hold contradictory critical standards among different artists within the same school or conceptual bubble. Each artist approaches work in his or her own way and it's fair to dismiss their work's unique shortcomings in conveying a common theme or viewpoint. We certainly don't uphold those standards in music criticism or film or any other art form I can think of.
     
  8. mordecai

    mordecai Well-Known Member

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    I often do the same, unapologetically. I don't think it's bad to hold contradictory critical standards among different artists within the same school or conceptual bubble. Each artist approaches work in his or her own way and it's fair to dismiss their work's unique shortcomings in conveying a common theme or viewpoint. We certainly don't uphold those standards in music criticism or film or any other art form I can think of.
    I guess it's important to note some sort of distinction between popular criticism (not meant pejoratively, I just can't think of a better word) and academic criticism. The latter is generally more concerned with addressing what a certain artist or [perhaps arbitrary] grouping of artists' work articulates or implies about their cultures. Addressing why certain currents or themes appear in artwork is more important here than addressing the stylistic choices of the artist and whether they please the critic. The former method of analysis involves looking at a show, or an artists body of work, and trying to convey why it is or is not worthwhile to look at, what it got right or wrong according to the critic's taste. I think Hughes is a funny skeptic, but outside of the visual he only analyzes work through the market, and through hype, which makes him more of a social commentator than a critic. Despite that hype, most art writers aren't obsessing over or excessively trashing Basquiat or Hirst. Doing either is shallow and obvious. I think Hughes condescends to his audience, and is something of an entertainer.
     
  9. Parker

    Parker Well-Known Member

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    I used to love Basquiat, but sort of in the way you love an immediately catchy record. After awhile you just never listen to it anymore.

    Have you guys read Dave Hickey? I think he's my favorite art writer.
     
  10. RSS

    RSS Well-Known Member

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    So I've been offered the opportunity to purchase a 17th century Madonna & Child in the Northern Baroque (more Mannerist in appearance in that the child has a vertebrae or two too many) tradition. It's beautiful ... but I'm finding the blonde Mary and blond Jesus a tad disturbing. Do I really want to hang Little Nazi Jesus on my walls?
     
  11. cimabue

    cimabue Well-Known Member

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    So I've been offered the opportunity to purchase a 17th century Madonna & Child in the Northern Baroque (more Mannerist in appearance in that the child has a vertebrae or two too many) tradition. It's beautiful ... but I'm finding the blonde Mary and blond Jesus a tad disturbing. Do I really want to hang Little Nazi Jesus on my walls?

    As a collector friend of mine might say, "Looks like a thalidomide baby!".

    He's a little crude, to say the least.
     
  12. mordecai

    mordecai Well-Known Member

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    I'm not always a fan of this painter's subject matter, but she is fantastic technically and I like these a lot. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  13. driveslowk

    driveslowk Well-Known Member

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    I really like the first three.
     
  14. Bhowie

    Bhowie Well-Known Member

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    I'm not always a fan of this painter's subject matter, but she is fantastic technically and I like these a lot.


    StevenHero mentioned this earlier, what does this mean exactly?
     
  15. mordecai

    mordecai Well-Known Member

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    StevenHero mentioned this earlier, what does this mean exactly?
    That she is good at moving paint around with a stick. Also can refer to mixing, pouring, dry brushing, cross hatching and more specific painting techniques, but generally means that someone has an interesting way of manipulating their medium in an intentional way. Perhaps as opposed to the aesthetic or conceptual point of view, which would address the content of the image or work.
    I really like the first three.
    I thought you liked pretty art girls.
     
  16. Parker

    Parker Well-Known Member

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    I really like the first three.

    Me too. The portrait loses something for me. The (amazing) brushwork is so curvy and soft that it's a good foil for the crazy mushroom clouds. But kinda works the other way for the girl.
     
  17. RSS

    RSS Well-Known Member

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    I'm not always a fan of this painter's subject matter, but she is fantastic technically and I like these a lot.
    I must disagree. I'm reminded too much of the techniques used to create mass-produced sofa-sized paintings ... or the techniques that are all too common on the all-night chanel show about how to paint trees and mountains.
     
  18. Mr_Incognito

    Mr_Incognito Well-Known Member

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    My new favorite artist.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Care to share the prices that these pieces command in the market?
     
  19. StephenHero

    StephenHero Well-Known Member

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    Originals go for tens of dollars, but forgeries are starting to flood the market.
     
  20. Mr_Incognito

    Mr_Incognito Well-Known Member

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    Thanks StephenHero, I like the extensive use of details in the last piece.
     

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