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Argentina (Buenos Aires, specifically)!

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by mack11211, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. LabelKing

    LabelKing Well-Known Member

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    I'd imagine there would also be a strong British influence on suits?
     
  2. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    I'd imagine there would also be a strong British influence on suits?
    Little known fact that the English basically controlled the Argentinean economy for over 50 years and the presidents of the Republic were really decided by the English Club of Argentina. Oh, damn I forgot to compile a list, I’ll try to do that this weekend. Jon.
     
  3. mr. magoo

    mr. magoo Well-Known Member

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    Lots of good information on Buenos Aires. What about suits? I know there is a strong Italian influence and was wondering if anyone knows of any places to get a well made custom suit. You cant argue with the exchange rate. From what I have gathered they are a well dressed bunch.

    I believe the only person on these boards (or AA) who's had custom work done went to a place called Cheverney Sasteria, across from the lovely French embassy. I cannot recall the poster's name, but the price was around $1000, needed several fittings over more than a week, and really required strong Spanish. If you do searches for that name, you'll find the posts.

    I found the Argentines to be on par with say Portuguese or Spaniards. Generally they are more apt to wear a collared shirt or jacket than most Americans, but not particularly high quality. You won't confuse them for being Milanese from the neck down.

    For the most part, the suits tend to be a little cheap and Italian-styled. Of course, there were some very, very well dressed fellows that I saw, but they were a minority. Guys under 25 tend to dress like Southern Californians -- lots of cool t-shirts and jeans and sneakers. They love to say they're like Paris or Barcelona, but mostly the city reminded me of LA or Miami. I see more "British influence" in Australia, Canada, or Boston (and no, I don't care to engage in a debate whether New England "trad" is British influenced or not).
     
  4. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    I believe the only person on these boards (or AA) who's had custom work done went to a place called Cheverney Sasteria, across from the lovely French embassy. I cannot recall the poster's name, but the price was around $1000, needed several fittings over more than a week, and really required strong Spanish. If you do searches for that name, you'll find the posts.

    I found the Argentines to be on par with say Portuguese or Spaniards. Generally they are more apt to wear a collared shirt or jacket than most Americans, but not particularly high quality. You won't confuse them for being Milanese from the neck down.

    For the most part, the suits tend to be a little cheap and Italian-styled. Of course, there were some very, very well dressed fellows that I saw, but they were a minority. Guys under 25 tend to dress like Southern Californians -- lots of cool t-shirts and jeans and sneakers. They love to say they're like Paris or Barcelona, but mostly the city reminded me of LA or Miami. I see more "British influence" in Australia, Canada, or Boston (and no, I don't care to engage in a debate whether New England "trad" is British influenced or not).


    Being from Bs As and living in SoFLA, I can say without reservation that Bs As is NOTHING like Miami. It's not even close. Not the layout, architecture, city structure, nightlife, arts and leisure, automobile style, transportation, attitude, laws, culture, overall lifestyle, food, and so on and so fourth. Seriously, they are worlds (literately) part.

    People under 25 dress about the same all over the world! Its all jeans, tees and sneakers, unless you know of a country where are the teenagers are always dressed in perfectly fitting 3-piece suits...

    Bs As is a lot more like Paris than you give it credit for, and the English influence is a lot more subdued these days, but its still there. Oh, and how do you except the average citizenry of a 3rd world country that just came out from under the largest economic default in history to dress in high-end clothing? How do you expect them to afford it?

    Now regarding whether New England is influenced by the British... j/k

    Jon.
     
  5. LabelKing

    LabelKing Well-Known Member

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    I believe it was Juan Peron who more or less took back control of the country?
     
  6. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    I believe it was Juan Peron who more or less took back control of the country?

    Yes and no. What Peron really did was make a lot of the utilities public poverty, thus not allowing the original oligarchy to keep on ripping people off through their privatized companies. At the same time the coffers of the Banco Nacional de la Republica Argentina were quite full, and Peron started food distribution program, which allowed people who were starving to eat (while at the same time curtailing their freedom). The original oligarchy, which still retained control of non-publicized companies were left with less power, but were replaced by the new oligarchy: the military.

    BTW, Peron was in the Italian army during the 30's, which helped shape some of his dictatorial and fascist views.

    Jon.
     
  7. redcaimen

    redcaimen Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the Cheverney Sasteria reference, Mr Magoo. Its a start. The guidebook I have goes on and on about leather goods but not a word on tailors.
     
  8. vc2000

    vc2000 Well-Known Member

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    QUOTE=chorse123] We were looking at Claridge as a hotel. Thoughts? [/quote]

    I'm not impressed by the Claridge. The photos appear better then it is - the location is not that great either.

    Not sure what you are looking for in a hotel.

    If you are looking for value try renting an apartment. You can get a very nice furnished apartment for less then a hotel.

    The Alvear Palace Hotel is the grand old hotel in BA. The lobby is wonderful as is the location. Like many older hotels the rooms can be small - the closet and bathrooms are from the days when you lucky to have one. (Read that as tiny)

    The Four Seasons is the Four Seasons - it is on the edge of the best area but near the highway and an underpass. (There is a great steak house in the under passage.) The rooms are large and generous.

    A more middle road choice is the Art Suites. The rooms are decent sized and new.

    Hope this helps.
     
  9. mr. magoo

    mr. magoo Well-Known Member

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    Being from Bs As and living in SoFLA, I can say without reservation that Bs As is NOTHING like Miami. It's not even close. Not the layout, architecture, city structure, nightlife, arts and leisure, automobile style, transportation, attitude, laws, culture, overall lifestyle, food, and so on and so fourth. Seriously, they are worlds (literately) part.

    People under 25 dress about the same all over the world! Its all jeans, tees and sneakers, unless you know of a country where are the teenagers are always dressed in perfectly fitting 3-piece suits...

    Bs As is a lot more like Paris than you give it credit for, and the English influence is a lot more subdued these days, but its still there. Oh, and how do you except the average citizenry of a 3rd world country that just came out from under the largest economic default in history to dress in high-end clothing? How do you expect them to afford it?


    Just returned from BsAs so this thread was somewhat on my mind. This is all coming from an outsider perspective. Of course, I don't know the city as well as you, but I do have the fresh eye of an outsider.

    First, let me clarify what I meant by my finding Argentina to be more like LA or Florida than western Europe -- whether it be Paris or wherever. First, it's at least as Latin American "feeling" as European, which captures a lot of FL or CA (unlike the northern US). Moreover, I also find the people to be more "American" than "European". Meaning the people are more open, friendly, giving and honest than you're likely to find in Europe.

    Going out in Paris I find it nearly impossible to speak to a stranger, especially as a male (North) American. In BsAs, on the other hand, I had many people strike up conversations with me. I'd say at least half the waiters and bartenders wanted to know where we were from, what we thought of BA, how long we were staying, asked if we wanted to come to a party, etc. That's something that's not really going to happen in Paris, but is more likely to happen in the US. Yes, there are lovely apartment buildings that could've been found in Paris, but many more that wouldn't.

    I don't think of BA as the same as Miami, but Americans shouldn't get the view that it's like France. It is its own place with its own unique feel. And if someone is planning on traveling there and wants to bring nicer clothes than they wear in the US for going out, I'd say generally don't bother. You're as likely to see flip-flops and t-shirts (which, by the way, is not something you see much of in the Paris) there as here.
     
  10. mack11211

    mack11211 Well-Known Member

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    Magoo: Please relate any shopping/consuming experiences.
     
  11. mr. magoo

    mr. magoo Well-Known Member

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    Magoo: Please relate any shopping/consuming experiences.

    First, the food and drink are fantastic. Food in BsAs is outstanding, from the casual cafes and bars to the tourist traps (e.g., Cabana Las Lilas) to the bright and hip (mostly in Palermo). They really know their grub down there. Steak is famous, but the Italian is superior to what you'd find in the US, NYC included. Also, plenty of creativity, especially in Palermo Viejo. You really can't go wrong.

    Second, wonderful handicrafts there. They have a solid indigenous tradition of handicrafts in the western and northern parts of the country, with a very sharp eye for design in BsAs. It means you can get great handmade items that you're unlikely to see anywhere else. Leatherwear, paper, weavings, etc. I picked up some very nice gifts for people -- e.g., unique leather gifts that would cost $250 in the US, were $50 in Argentina.

    Third, is the clothing. As stated before, the t-shirts and jeans are first rate and their upper end clothing tends to be relatively conservative. I'm not a big t-shirt and jeans buyer, but it'd be a great place to pick up some unique designs at Felix or Bolivia or other spots, especially in Palermo. I found some good things at Balthazar (the Paul Smith of BsAs) in Palermo, James Smart in Recoleta (one of their upper end spots), and a small "polo"-ish store in the Jockey Club building in Recoleta who's name alludes me. Very, very good prices, but few things so unique you wouldn't see versions of them in the US or Europe.

    I did not partake in bespoke, which can be a challenge when you speak the same language -- my Spanish is woeful. But I saw some nice spots -- a shirtmaker at Santa Fe and Callou, a tailor with beautiful things in the window in Arenales. If you have the language skills, it would be a great souvenir. Given that their economy has picked up, I doubt the artisans' schedules are as free as they were a few years ago, so I bet you need a good chunk of time. Any particular questions, feel free to ask.
     
  12. mack11211

    mack11211 Well-Known Member

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    Just found a BA clothing report from, I believe, earlier this year.

    Doesn't cover bespoke stuff and is mainly oriented toward women's but does cover many men's lines and has nice pix of store interiors and some clothes.

    Very comprehensive on indigenous casual and jeans/streetwear stuff. Bolivia and Felix, again sound interesting.

    http://www.jcreport.com/mailer/issue82/index.html
     
  13. chorse123

    chorse123 Well-Known Member

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  14. AlexP415

    AlexP415 Well-Known Member

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    I am planning an October trip, as well. Does anyone know of a reputable bespoke shoemaker? Is it even worthwhile to try to have bespoke shoes made in BA??

    Alex
     
  15. misterbowles

    misterbowles Well-Known Member

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    BA is an amazing place; enjoy it!
     
  16. want.2B.bones

    want.2B.bones New Member

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    I've been to Bs As several times and every time I go I can't wait to go to Felix. Here is the website www.felixba.com.ar
     
  17. mack11211

    mack11211 Well-Known Member

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    I depart tomorrow from BA. Have been here nearly two weeks. Wonderful trip. Learned a few things, clothes wise. Will post more later.
     
  18. chorse123

    chorse123 Well-Known Member

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    Looking forward to your report. I booked my tickets for November last week!
     
  19. heyde

    heyde New Member

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    We had a good experience travelling Argentina Buenos Aires,we new most beautiful places and cool people and we new a interesting wear shop in Palermo Soho call Raftok in Thames1633, it's really cool and have real exclusive designs for mens wear.
    We are now looking the way to come back in a couple of month and I know the first place for shop it's gone be www.raftok.com.ar have a look in the web page and then tell me what you think about
     
  20. chapunso

    chapunso Well-Known Member

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    Best shoemaker in town: lopez taibo: you will find it across the street from hotel alvear, and also in calle florida. different lines of shoes: i recommend the english style (700 pesos). also buy tuxedo slippers. they are great.
     

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