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Applying for a job and pissing off superiors

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Connemara, Jun 1, 2011.

  1. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    I got to an office and collect a paycheck but I don't actually do anything. [​IMG]

    Sounds like the perfect job for you. If they actually asked you to do things, imagine your superiors horror when they find out that you aren't able to actually do anything.
     
  2. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    honestly: someone who works for me just came in with that exact situation. she's great. she's vital to my department and will be hard to replace (OK, these two things may not fit your situation). but in the end, there's no way I can stand in the way of her going for a position she wants. most bosses will feel this way ... eventually.

    Mine didn't and did everything he could to make sure I got the boot. [​IMG]
     
  3. NAMOR

    NAMOR Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like the perfect job for you. If they actually asked you to do things, imagine your superiors horror when they find out that you aren't able to actually do anything.

    this made me lol in the bathroom stall at work
     
  4. Connemara

    Connemara Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't be pissed off, but I would assume that if it didn't work out, my report was still looking to leave and I should be looking to replace him ASAP.
    Right, that's how I feel they'd react. My two direct supervisors are very new to management and it's very difficult to get a "read" on them, but I suspect they'd react in this way. Like I said, this is a good opportunity, but not a great opportunity. I don't think it's worth the risk. Sigh.
     
  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    honestly: someone who works for me just came in with that exact situation. she's great. she's vital to my department and will be hard to replace (OK, these two things may not fit your situation). but in the end, there's no way I can stand in the way of her going for a position she wants. most bosses will feel this way ... eventually.

    +1 I've always encouraged underlings to take a new job that was good for them. You can't stop people from progressing and it's a small world. Encourage people on their way up as you never know when they'll end up being your boss, be in a position to help you, offer a good word about you, etc.
     
  6. 45elkton

    45elkton Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion sneaking around is a very high-risk/low-reward mode of navigating this process. In most companies this process is managed by people in HR who will likely contact your current manager either for a reference or for some inconsequential detail to justify them having a job. Frankly I would have grave concerns if my new manager didn't care about the qualifications and performance of an internal applicant to not even pick up the phone and call your manager.

    You should go to your manager and level with them. It might not be what they want to hear and their immediate reaction might not be ideal, but they will come around and respect you more for it. Just be able to explain why you think this is the right move for you and i think you will find them supportive and ready to endorse you. I've heard of people's managers getting called to provide a reference that didn't know their subordinate was applying for other jobs... super awkward [​IMG]
     
  7. foodguy

    foodguy Well-Known Member

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    +1 I've always encouraged underlings to take a new job that was good for them. You can't stop people from progressing and it's a small world. Encourage people on their way up as you never know when they'll end up being your boss, be in a position to help you, offer a good word about you, etc.

    +1 true story: my big boss (editor of the entire paper) is married to my former deputy. i never made a better decision than going along supportively when she suddenly decided she needed to take a couple of months off because their adoption came through! (would have done it anyway, she was great and it was the right thing to do, but it is nice when doing the right thing pays off).
     
  8. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    I've most highly respected bosses that encouraged moving forward. They're the few that have actually caused me to regret moving on. The others; not so much~

    Rational bosses know that they can find a replacement, and they also know that it's better that you tell them and allow them to plan for your loss than to be blindly confronted by it.
     
  9. brokencycle

    brokencycle Well-Known Member

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    At my company, only the recruiter and hiring manager/interviewers are supposed to know, and they're not supposed to share that info with people. Also, my boss told me last week that he wants the team to have "healthy turnover" and he expects me to advance in the near future.
     

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