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Anyone work in clothing sales? Harry Rosen, Nordstrom, NM, etc?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by 604Coast, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. Chiaroscuro

    Chiaroscuro Well-Known Member

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    although i do believe during good economic times the commissions and wages were perhaps considerable enough to maintain a retail career, i cant help to think that a lot of these claims of 100000 + /year incomes were at least a bit exaggerated by the worker. i always have had experience of people exaggerating their pay whenever they talk about it, if you look into it (or find out from another source incidentally that is how i found out not that i really cared) you ll find out that in this country they always exaggerate.
    but if they really can pull 100000 a year regularly at normal places like saks and bg then hell im going to apply too.
    you see, that is my other point, why dont you see hoards of people applying for these jobs?


    I could believe 100k in cosmetics. Any man with some experience with women knows how much makeup they have. High end makeup is seriously expensive, and people with money will buy it. If you factor in holiday sales, plus base pay 100k could be possible. Only a salesperson with a high base pay and a fantastic client list could do this though.
     
  2. West24

    West24 Well-Known Member

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    although i do believe during good economic times the commissions and wages were perhaps considerable enough to maintain a retail career, i cant help to think that a lot of these claims of 100000 + /year incomes were at least a bit exaggerated by the worker. i always have had experience of people exaggerating their pay whenever they talk about it, if you look into it (or find out from another source incidentally that is how i found out not that i really cared) you ll find out that in this country they always exaggerate.
    but if they really can pull 100000 a year regularly at normal places like saks and bg then hell im going to apply too.
    you see, that is my other point, why dont you see hoards of people applying for these jobs?


    actually they are. i know when a position came up for a certain spot hundreds and hundreds applications were sent in.
     
  3. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    I used to work retail, and this description is VERY accurate.

    On the other hand, you can actually make pretty decent money if you work at a big volume store and you're a decent salesperson.

    I worked the sales during my breaks in college, and I would make anywhere from $30-50 per hour. Then, during slower times I averaged around $23 per hour, so not too shabby for a job that requires no real responsibility.


    When and where was this? Because $23 an hour in retail is certainly the exception and not the rule.
     
  4. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    actually they are. i know when a position came up for a certain spot hundreds and hundreds applications were sent in.

    Because there is high unemployment and stores like Saks pay almost (by almost I mean almost every department) 100% commission, so their risk is very little (if you don't make up $750 of draw, they let you go; $750 is nothing to them) if you don;t perform.

    At the same time, the turnover is so high that positions constantly become available. Why is the turnover so high? Because you don't make the money that they promise you can make.
     
  5. Chiaroscuro

    Chiaroscuro Well-Known Member

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    Depends on what he's selling and what the commission is. His base pay is probably factored in as well.
     
  6. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    Depends on what he's selling and what the commission is. His base pay is probably factored in as well.

    What base pay? Saks, NM, BG, Barney's etc all work on draw vs. commission. You don't sell, you get paid less than $400 a week (before taxes!) and they only cover that for a while (arrears), until they let you go.

    Also consider:

    1) Making a clientele list takes many, many, many years
    2) Many sales people I know that have been in the biz for many, many years that have very large clientele lists say that customers are shopping less and less with 'their salesperson'. Frankly, 'clienteling' in regards to clothing (especially men's clothing) does not work like it used to. A combination of factors, including the internet, the readily availability of all but the most obscure brands and the general dehumanization of contact that has been occurring don't help.

    On a side note, cosmetics is the exception to the rule, since most women don't want some random person touching their face and applying make up. However, many of the cosmetic brands in major retailers are as every year passes by more and more leased departments, and often the sales people in the leased departments don't work on commission, rather are paid a salary / hourly rate.
     
  7. brlfvr

    brlfvr Well-Known Member

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  8. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    If your previous position was in sales, which I assume is more of the type you work out of office and call people, why don't you try that for manufacturers or distributors to sell to retailers? That would be a completely different experience than retail sales.

    It is. It's called 'account executive'. Very hard to get into, but pays far, far better than a normal sales job and is frankly, far easier. Also, a lot more perks, like full clothing allowance.
     
  9. m_00

    m_00 Member

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    i would love for somebody on here to speak honestly about what a regular day looks like at a harry rosen.
    i mean for one there is always at least 15 sales associates on call at any given time.
    so you're splitting the pie 20 ways (theoretically).
    and i'm sure there are always really hot days but i would imagine most people aren't grossing more than 200 dollars a day if you averaged it out.
    i think the myth of 100k in commission retail sales is always an inflated number.
    just doing the math on what you'd have to be selling a day doesn't add up.
    but if there is someone on here working at a high volume downtown/major city retail location who is doing it, i'd love to hear from you...
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2013
  10. woodywoodford

    woodywoodford Well-Known Member

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    The only person I've ever met in retail who actually demonstrated any passion at all about the products they were selling was my high school teacher who retired and took a job at the hometown suit shop. It's a shame that the place only sells cheap small town stuff, cause I've been keeping an eye out everywhere for another like him. I suspect it has to do with the internet - people research what they want nowadays, so the store clerks don't actually need to do anything more than ring the till. Random schmucks command lower pay than the ones who know what they're talking about. Sad.
     
  11. VinnyMac

    VinnyMac Well-Known Member

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    The ONLY person who I've ever met who genuinely enjoyed retail was the manager of a health supplement store that I worked in during college. He was a really good guy and enjoyed his job. I left years ago, but he still works there. Some people put on fronts for customers, but when you work with them, you realize how unengaged and stressed they are. This guy was the real deal.

    You may think that a little extra pay or a product that you're interested in will make the job more enjoyable, but retail is retail; it doesn't matter what you're selling, the job is essentially the same. Unless you're like my former manager, retail's a space-filler for college kids and people who can't do better.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2013
  12. Upward

    Upward Well-Known Member

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    A friend who works at Nordstrom said her pay was cut from $50,000/YR to $30,000/YR. I think if she did not invest many years at Nordstrom she would have quit by now. She doesn't appear to be as happy as she was years ago when times were better.
     
  13. VinnyMac

    VinnyMac Well-Known Member

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    Unless they replaced that $20k with a reasonable commission structure, that's outrageous. I would have started looking for another job immediately. Hopefully, she hasn't just been spinning the wheels there and has added some meaningful accomplishments/skills to her resume.

    I've said it before, and I'll say it again; retail is for suckers. I don't care what the company is. It's monkey work.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013

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