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anyone ever use tom fords mtm program?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by AvariceBespoke, Nov 16, 2008.

  1. unpainted huffheinz

    unpainted huffheinz Well-Known Member

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    Say what you will about Tom Ford, but this season's ad campaign is one of the most entertaining of all time.
     
  2. edmorel

    edmorel Well-Known Member

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    Better use of a hand?


    For me, yes. For him, it looks like he is disgusted and would prefer a manlier touch.

    BTW, his lapels are wider than her legs. I'm not a chubby chaser but my women have to have a bit more meat on them. Her arse on the other hand..............
     
  3. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks aportnoy, my little boy who was walking on my back when I scrolled down just announced to my wife that "daddy was looking at a naked lady online..." [​IMG]
     
  4. aportnoy

    aportnoy Well-Known Member

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    Thanks aportnoy, my little boy who was walking on my back when I scrolled down just announced to my wife that "daddy was looking at a naked lady online..." [​IMG]

    [​IMG] Sorry about that,i just put mine to bed.

    We had gone far too many posts without some gratuitous nudity.
     
  5. unpainted huffheinz

    unpainted huffheinz Well-Known Member

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    BTW, his lapels are wider than her legs.

    And a new fit metric is born. The edmorel ratio: width of lapel to the thigh of the women you are banging.
     
  6. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG] Sorry about that,i just put mine to bed. We had gone far too many posts without some gratuitous nudity.
    ^Very true. Here's a little more Tom Ford for you guys... http://www.jossip.com/wp/docs/2007/10/tom-ford.JPG
     
  7. AvariceBespoke

    AvariceBespoke Well-Known Member

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    And a new fit metric is born. The edmorel ratio: width of lapel to the thigh of the women you are banging.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. LabelKing

    LabelKing Well-Known Member

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    It's always these Tom Ford/Thom Browne threads that go on for pages.
     
  9. TRINI

    TRINI Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it's been mentioned as yet but apparently there's 4 different templates to chooose from when getting MTM. The fitters at the store help to determine which of the four is best suited to the customer.
     
  10. vitaminc

    vitaminc Well-Known Member

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    His point was that Tom Ford designs better than the OP or any forum member for that matter.

    +1, especially with all those bespoke tragedies on this forum.

    What 'design' does Tom Ford put into his suits? Wide lapels, roped 'pagoda' shoulders, and severe waist supression aren't exactly voodoo. None of those things will confuse a competent bespoke tailor.

    Anyway, Tom Ford is the only person I've seen that looks halfway decent in a Tom Ford suit. Take a look at Daniel Craig in Quantum of Solace. The ridiculously convex shoulder line, stiff shape, and too-high buttoning point make it look he's always dangling from an invisible coat hanger.


    Those 'designs' could of course be done by a competent tailor, and I am pretty sure Rubinacci could achieve the above mentioned properties if he choose to (and be offended). Making a suit is much similar to cooking; the receipts are all very similar with same ingredients, but the keys to making a to-die-for meal is 1) proportions of each ingredients and 2) techniques of cooking.

    As for a bespoke garment, I could very confidently say that most bespoke customers have no idea how #1 works thus resulting in some ridiculous looking suits/jackets. Rubinacci or other bespoke tailor only offers #2 and some suggestions of #1.

    As for Tom Ford MTM, he offers maybe top notch #1 and maybe mediocre #2, but the result will be much better than sub par proportions with superior techniques.

    You can get a Tom Ford-esque suit from a Savile Row tailor.

    Not sure about Tom Ford-esque, but certainly 007-styled suits. In particular, Kilgour.

    I don't think it's been mentioned as yet but apparently there's 4 different templates to chooose from when getting MTM. The fitters at the store help to determine which of the four is best suited to the customer.

    Any details on pricing of some basic fabrics?
     
  11. babygreenspots

    babygreenspots Well-Known Member

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    I still think the best choice is to search consignment shops in NYC for the Gucci/YSL suits that are pretty much the same. Or perhaps get a vintage YSL suit and have it altered. The fabric won't be as good, but this approach just seems to show more character. Does one need the exact Tom Ford suit to look like a movie star/pimp/Studio 54 junkie from the 70s? It seems this look would have more credibility if it was assembled through more organic means. But I guess the point here isn't to debate the look...
     
  12. Robwynge

    Robwynge Well-Known Member

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    There isn't much to add to this thread, but I can't resist making two somewhat disconnected comments:

    1. I find it mysterious that members of this forum continue to regard bespoke so highly when bespoke suits, shirts and shoes posted or discussed on here often contain problems with respect to fit. It seems common that the best bespoke work is often the product of more than one effort. My first MTM/bespoke suit fit quite poorly. How many people have found their first bespoke suit, shirt, or shoes to fit perfectly?

    2. I find it amusing that people complain about the price of Tom Ford but then recommend bespoke as an alternative - as if that were a bargin! While we all like to get the most for our money, if you can afford bespoke, you can afford Tom Ford. If the price difference of a grand or two is an issue, you shouldn't be buying either. By a decent RTW, have it well tailored, and you'll look better than most professional men.
     
  13. babygreenspots

    babygreenspots Well-Known Member

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    There isn't much to add to this thread, but I can't resist making two somewhat disconnected comments:

    1. I find it mysterious that members of this forum continue to regard bespoke so highly when bespoke suits, shirts and shoes posted or discussed on here often contain problems with respect to fit. It seems common that the best bespoke work is often the product of more than one effort. My first MTM/bespoke suit fit quite poorly. How many people have found their first bespoke suit, shirt, or shoes to fit perfectly?

    2. I find it amusing that people complain about the price of Tom Ford but then recommend bespoke as an alternative - as if that were a bargin! While we all like to get the most for our money, if you can afford bespoke, you can afford Tom Ford. If the price difference of a grand or two is an issue, you shouldn't be buying either. By a decent RTW, have it well tailored, and you'll look better than most professional men.


    1. This is a great point. Also bespoke takes a lot of time and effort. The house styles are also often not to the taste of the clients some of whom, for better or worse, hope for something more fashionable like Tom Ford.

    2. Also a good point. If price is an issue, get it made in Asia or alter something from a thrift shop.
     
  14. yfyf

    yfyf Well-Known Member

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    I have a very good friend who uses TF's MTM program. He's a very awkward size to fit, 48 chest, even larger at the biceps, 36 waist, but the TF cut does seem to do him justice, though I've only had a brief look at it on him. He's been picking SB 3 pieces and he works in real estate.

    The TF pricing has reached astronomical pricing simply because there is enough demand to keep it there. Shirts have been upped to near $500 from $300 odd and MTM has increased to a similar level. TF has fabric books that look "proprietary", there is no listing of who makes it. Fabrics are "graded" and the price is set according to "grade". The last time he went in, they wanted 8k for one of the fabrics he chose, though he has no idea of the composition and is not familiar with suiting fabrics in general. He says he's going to give Chan a go next year [​IMG] He's been very happy with the experience but with the pricing the way it is, he's decided to look elsewhere.
     
  15. Sator

    Sator Well-Known Member

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    No, my reasoning stems from the fact that nobody here has defined the Tom Ford look to be anything more than a set of styling cues; these cues were not invented by Tom Ford and can easily be incorporated by someone else.

    If your point-of-view rests on the assumption that Tom Ford's look is composed of parts that are original to Tom Ford and cannot be replicated, the burden rests on you to show that such is the case. Otherwise, you've assumed yourself right in the first place.


    I agree with this summary. However, you are wasting your time arguing this point. Advertising works. It obviously has people here quite in its thrall. They are now beautifully brain washed into thinking that if they get a TB MTO lounge that they will look like James Bond. What's the point in arguing? Let them go off and pay big bucks for it only to discover that the thrill was in the chase, and that what they got in the end wasn't quite the non plus ultra that they had been promised.
     
  16. Fuuma

    Fuuma Well-Known Member

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    I agree with this summary. However, you are wasting your time arguing this point. Advertising works. It obviously has people here quite in its thrall. They are now beautifully brain washed into thinking that if they get a TB MTO lounge that they will look like James Bond. What's the point in arguing? Let them go off and pay big bucks for it only to discover that the thrill was in the chase, and that what they got in the end wasn't quite the non plus ultra that they had been promised.

    I am aware that "non plus ultra" is appropriate but am curious as to why exactly you didn't use it the way it has entered the vernacular (nec plus ultra).

    A set of mythic representations of times begone holds you in it's thrall as surely as the evil of advertising has ever held anyone here or elsewhere.
     
  17. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Well-Known Member

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    I agree with this summary. However, you are wasting your time arguing this point. Advertising works. It obviously has people here quite in its thrall. They are now beautifully brain washed into thinking that if they get a TB MTO lounge that they will look like James Bond. What's the point in arguing? Let them go off and pay big bucks for it only to discover that the thrill was in the chase, and that what they got in the end wasn't quite the non plus ultra that they had been promised.

    Do you really think that I have any interest in Tom Ford or for one brief second would consider paying for Tom Ford? It adds nothing to the conversation to impugn people's motives with such a broad brush, especially when you should know by now that I'd much rather pretend to be John Steed than James Bond. [​IMG]
     
  18. Fuuma

    Fuuma Well-Known Member

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    Do you really think that I have any interest in Tom Ford or for one brief second would consider paying for Tom Ford? It adds nothing to the conversation to impugn people's motives with such a broad brush, especially when you should know by now that I'd much rather pretend to be John Steed than James Bond. [​IMG]

    I believe that's true for most posters who defended TF here; we're attacking shoddy reasonings and the internalization of certain rules and conceptions, reinforced by this and other clothing forums, that brings some posters to perceive their viewpoints as common wisdom.
     
  19. Sator

    Sator Well-Known Member

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    +1000. I couldn't imagine going to my tailor and saying "can you copy this?"

    I do it all the time. I usually have fashion plates or even patterns that I bring along. If you look at old fashion plates eg the ones in Apparel Arts etc, you can tell that the illustrator had in mind both tailor and customer in drafting it. For example this one:

    [​IMG]

    Notice the way construction details of every seam is shown from both front and back. There is enough detail there for a cutter to draft a pattern. The following plate is particularly interesting in that you can see evidence that a customer or tailor has inked in alterations to the cut, when putting in his order for a dress suit back in 1873:

    [​IMG]

    Even within living memory, tailors used to get lots of fashion plates like this each season from cloth merchants showing the latest cuts and styles in fashion. On the reverse side, you often find swatches of the suggested cloths. Plates also appeared in other magazines and periodicals intended to be cut out and taken to the tailor. This helped to propel along incessant change in the cut of bespoke tailored garments from year to year. Old cutting manuals make it clear that tailors might be asked to cut garments with drape one year and close fitting another - all according to fashion. Not only that, but they were able to make a huge range of different garments. There was none of this "just make me a suit" business. You would have been asked "but Sir, what type of suit? - a dress suit, a morning suit, a lounge/sack suit, court suit, Norfolk jacket suit, frock coat suit..." - with the fashionable cut of each changing every season.

    I really see no reason why a customer should not still be able to use current images to use as templates for his tailor to cut off.
     
  20. yfyf

    yfyf Well-Known Member

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    if they get a TB MTO lounge that they will look like James Bond.
    I am a little surprised at this comment from you considering the TF aesthetic is one not that far removed from yours. i.e. a little extravagant, slightly old-school. I mean no offense, I hold your more technical posts (esp. on LL) in high regard. In any case, TF (these days, not Gucci/YSL days) has been liked since before the advertising and Bond tie-in.
    A set of mythic representations of times begone holds you in it's thrall as surely as the evil of advertising has ever held anyone here or elsewhere.
    [​IMG] Thread needs more pictures. This is what first turned me onto TF: [​IMG] Large - http://bp1.blogger.com/_qjpwnPW4c1o/...hnpldpurpw.jpg
     

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