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Any Biologists/Chemists here? (That means you Doctors/dentists/pharmacists)

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by sofaking9000, Mar 15, 2011.

  1. sofaking9000

    sofaking9000 Well-Known Member

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    I'm trying to decide what I wanna do. I wanna hear people's real life experiences, what are the work hours like, what will Obamacare do to your pay, are you in private practice, how long did it take you get to where you are, if you could repeat your education...what would you do, any things you wanna warn a newbie about?
     
  2. lee_44106

    lee_44106 Well-Known Member

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    the Zoo
    Big Law is where it's at, ........noobie [​IMG]
     
  3. mm84321

    mm84321 Well-Known Member

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  4. sofaking9000

    sofaking9000 Well-Known Member

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    Big Law is where it's at, ........noobie [​IMG]

    right...spend 8 years, earn the most debt compared to med/business students and then if you didn't graduate from a top 10 school, you end up in some shitty temp job making 30-40K with hours upon hours, yea man Big Law is awesome [​IMG]
     
  5. ramuman

    ramuman Well-Known Member

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    right...spend 8 years, earn the most debt compared to med/business students and then if you didn't graduate from a top 10 school, you end up in some shitty temp job making 30-40K with hours upon hours, yea man Big Law is awesome [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. sofaking9000

    sofaking9000 Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Gibonius

    Gibonius Well-Known Member

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    PM Gibonius

    Ask and ye shall receive!

    I'm actually a chemist though, I don't work in medicine, which seems to be what the OP is asking about.

    I've had people ask me why I didn't go into medicine. There's a certain appeal to it, but I'm glad I went the way I did. Chem is fun, lots of options, lots of cool toys and interesting problems to solve. Pay is decent/good, job security is relatively high by the American standard. I have no debt and money in the bank before I turn 30, something most medical doctors can't say.
     
  8. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Well-Known Member

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    Worked as a biologist for a year (studied migratory habits of paddlefish) and then went back for a business degree. The bad thing about biology (actually like many fields), the more you advance, the less fun stuff you get to do.

    Another friend who studied molecular bio wound up at Genzyme, scrutinizing fetuses for evidence of birth defects.
     
  9. sofaking9000

    sofaking9000 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Mar 3, 2011
    Worked as a biologist for a year (studied migratory habits of paddlefish) and then went back for a business degree. The bad thing about biology (actually like many fields), the more you advance, the less fun stuff you get to do.

    Another friend who studied molecular bio wound up at Genzyme, scrutinizing fetuses for evidence of birth defects.


    Oh man that must have been a bummer, all that time and money down the drain [​IMG]

    I can't imagine how boring that must have been and holy shit those fish are scary. Look like sharks with gigantic spades on their noses. I saw Deep Blue Sea when I was a kid...our bathroom was blue it had to be repainted/retiled white [​IMG]
     
  10. Contingency Plan

    Contingency Plan Well-Known Member

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    London
    All my pharm and med friends really enjoy their work overall. The meds are paid more, but generally work more hours.
     
  11. DesertSolitaire

    DesertSolitaire Active Member

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    OP, maybe reconsider your career choice. I work with cardiologists on a daily basis, there are benefits to the long hours, but it requires a high level of intelligence and great commitment to be a successful doctor.
     
  12. HgaleK

    HgaleK Well-Known Member

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    Ask and ye shall receive!

    I'm actually a chemist though, I don't work in medicine, which seems to be what the OP is asking about.

    I've had people ask me why I didn't go into medicine. There's a certain appeal to it, but I'm glad I went the way I did. Chem is fun, lots of options, lots of cool toys and interesting problems to solve. Pay is decent/good, job security is relatively high by the American standard. I have no debt and money in the bank before I turn 30, something most medical doctors can't say.


    What degrees did you end up with to land the job you have?
     
  13. deadly7

    deadly7 Well-Known Member

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    What degrees did you end up with to land the job you have?

    Pretty sure GIb's mentioned elsewhere he has a PhD in synthetic chemistry, but I don't remember which field specifically (organic, inorganic, catalyst, etc. etc.). I may be wrong though.
     
  14. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,923
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Location:
    McAnally Flats
    Oh man that must have been a bummer, all that time and money down the drain [​IMG]

    I can't imagine how boring that must have been and holy shit those fish are scary. Look like sharks with gigantic spades on their noses. I saw Deep Blue Sea when I was a kid...our bathroom was blue it had to be repainted/retiled white [​IMG]


    Dude, it was the best job I'll ever have in my life. I drifted a boat down the Yellowstone River, getting a great tan and watching elk and shit swim across the river. And those fish are damn tasty. Like an oily freshwater shark.
     
  15. watchcollector2454

    watchcollector2454 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    341
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2007
    I'm trying to decide what I wanna do. I wanna hear people's real life experiences, what are the work hours like, what will Obamacare do to your pay, are you in private practice, how long did it take you get to where you are, if you could repeat your education...what would you do, any things you wanna warn a newbie about?

    life sciences as an undergrad, a couple years of research, then a phd in molecular bio and then a medical degree. academic clinician is the end goal. it really depends on what you want. i value my independence so being able to maintain at least a part time position in academia is ideal for me. i don't mind the long hours/shitty pay as long as i enjoy what i am doing and feel like i am having an impact. you're still young and have a shitload of options. take classes and get involved with various things and start figuring out what you like and don't like and make your decision based on that.
     
  16. LoMC

    LoMC Member

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    11
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    Feb 18, 2011
    I did pre-medicine and engineering and I couldn't stand how cutthroat the students were in my bio/chem/ochem classes. The pre-meds are a bunch of conniving bastards with no lives, if you ask me. I'm only half kidding, by the way.

    It really depends what you're looking for in life. If you truly want to be a doctor, then suck it up and just grind it out. Based on my experience, I would say that you're going to hate your classmates for 4 years, semi-hate them throughout medical school and come out with a rewarding career in medicine, assuming you pass boards and get your residency done.

    When people say it's hard work, they're not mincing words. I'm literally not joking about having no life. My friend at UCSF Medical School told me she studied upwards of 8 hours per day, on top of having leadership positions in clubs, securing a research position after her freshman year, having 10 published papers on PubMed and attending all lectures. That worked out to about 2-4 hours of sleep for her a night for four years, a 4.0 undergraduate GPA in Molecular Biology, and a lot of hating life. In the process, she also became a sociopath and I'm terrified that she's going to be a doctor - my only solace is that as long as I have a say in it, she won't be mine.

    Overall, my experience with pre-meds has not been favorable. A couple of my more prominent memories of organic chemistry involve taking my friend to the hospital because he had a nervous breakdown, not being surprised that somebody ripped out key chapters of the ochem books on library reserve, and having heard multiple classmates tell me that they've had their books stolen from their dorm rooms/apartments/backpacks during finals week. I highly recommend investing in a good set of locks, not sharing your room with anyone, and never taking your eyes off your stuff. My friend who had the emotional breakdown developed paranoid delusions that someone was going to break into his room while he was gone and steal his ochem/bio/chem books. Another friend left her study area in the library while studying with "friends" to pee and came back to discover that her ochem book was missing and that her "friends" didnt see anyone take the book. She later found that the book had been returned to her with pages missing (presumably so she couldn't even sell her book back to the bookstore after the quarter ended)... after everyone had taken the final exam.

    On the bright side, you will make friends. 90% of these friends will copy your homework, never allow you to see theirs, and lie to you about when midterms are or when/where things are due. Don't drop your guard. Seriously.

    From glossing over your other post about your parents, it sounds like you will probably end up rebelling against the parentals and partying like hell in college. You don't want to be in pre-med for that, it'll wreck your gpa and screw you out of medical school.

    Bottom line of my rant is that you have two options: have no life in college, work your ass off and not sleep, or enjoy your undergraduate experience and maybe decide to take pre-med courses after you've worked the party out of your system. I've had 90% of my friends either burn out doing pre-med or wreck their GPAs to the point that even grad schools won't take them.

    The scary thing is is that you'll convince yourself that this will never happen to you - you'll never burn out. After all, you did well in high school, right? Wrong, bro. Everyone thinks they're the shit when they're 18. Only a few people actually are. Better to not chance it and find out you aren't the hard way.
     
  17. watchcollector2454

    watchcollector2454 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    341
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2007
    I did pre-medicine and engineering and I couldn't stand how cutthroat the students were in my bio/chem/ochem classes. The pre-meds are a bunch of conniving bastards with no lives, if you ask me. I'm only half kidding, by the way.

    It really depends what you're looking for in life. If you truly want to be a doctor, then suck it up and just grind it out. Based on my experience, I would say that you're going to hate your classmates for 4 years, semi-hate them throughout medical school and come out with a rewarding career in medicine, assuming you pass boards and get your residency done.

    When people say it's hard work, they're not mincing words. I'm literally not joking about having no life. My friend at UCSF Medical School told me she studied upwards of 8 hours per day, on top of having leadership positions in clubs, securing a research position after her freshman year, having 10 published papers on PubMed and attending all lectures. That worked out to about 2-4 hours of sleep for her a night for four years, a 4.0 undergraduate GPA in Molecular Biology, and a lot of hating life. In the process, she also became a sociopath and I'm terrified that she's going to be a doctor - my only solace is that as long as I have a say in it, she won't be mine.

    Overall, my experience with pre-meds has not been favorable. A couple of my more prominent memories of organic chemistry involve taking my friend to the hospital because he had a nervous breakdown, not being surprised that somebody ripped out key chapters of the ochem books on library reserve, and having heard multiple classmates tell me that they've had their books stolen from their dorm rooms/apartments/backpacks during finals week. I highly recommend investing in a good set of locks, not sharing your room with anyone, and never taking your eyes off your stuff. My friend who had the emotional breakdown developed paranoid delusions that someone was going to break into his room while he was gone and steal his ochem/bio/chem books. Another friend left her study area in the library while studying with "friends" to pee and came back to discover that her ochem book was missing and that her "friends" didnt see anyone take the book. She later found that the book had been returned to her with pages missing (presumably so she couldn't even sell her book back to the bookstore after the quarter ended)... after everyone had taken the final exam.

    On the bright side, you will make friends. 90% of these friends will copy your homework, never allow you to see theirs, and lie to you about when midterms are or when/where things are due. Don't drop your guard. Seriously.

    From glossing over your other post about your parents, it sounds like you will probably end up rebelling against the parentals and partying like hell in college. You don't want to be in pre-med for that, it'll wreck your gpa and screw you out of medical school.

    Bottom line of my rant is that you have two options: have no life in college, work your ass off and not sleep, or enjoy your undergraduate experience and maybe decide to take pre-med courses after you've worked the party out of your system. I've had 90% of my friends either burn out doing pre-med or wreck their GPAs to the point that even grad schools won't take them.

    The scary thing is is that you'll convince yourself that this will never happen to you - you'll never burn out. After all, you did well in high school, right? Wrong, bro. Everyone thinks they're the shit when they're 18. Only a few people actually are. Better to not chance it and find out you aren't the hard way.


    wow - this is an awful picture of pre-meds. what schools did these people go to???
     
  18. Zach

    Zach Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    I'm in my 3rd year of med school now - I can offer only a little insight into the beginning phases of becoming a physician.

    The first two years are pretty boring and don't seem at all related to what you went to med school for. You sit in a class, occasionally go on little token visits to the hospital, and generally just read a lot. Many schools now record lectures, so you can pretty well get the first two years done on-line. It's pretty much all in preparation for the USMLE Step 1 Exam - once you get that out of the way, it's a big relief.

    Third year is much better - the hours are longer, but at least you're getting a taste of what you went to school for. I think my worst week was night float on OB/GYN, something in the range of 90 hours over one week of nights. Busy in its own right, but more so because you're still expected to attend lectures, conferences, read, prepare for exams, etc. in your "spare time."

    Even then, I don't think it is as bad as some make it out to be. Plenty of my classmates go out the the bars on their off days. There is lots of studying, but you learn to work it into your schedule at the appropriate time. I think LoMC's account may be a bit of a stretch.

    I'm getting ready to apply for orthopaedic surgery programs - as far as residency goes, new ACGME guidelines are capping next year's interns at no more than 16 hours per shift(this is true for all residencies) - that is actually less by a fair margin than I'm working on call days on my peds rotation. Residents at my program take call q5, arrive at the hospital around 6 and usually get out by 6 PM it seems. Most, if not all residents, are getting job offers by their 4th year of residency, just about everyone has a job lined up prior to graduation (unless they're doing a fellowship, which is more and more frequent).

    Edit - if you're interested in going to med school, a few pointers on what to look for when applying...

    PBL education style is the bane of all students' existence. It's touted as the new wave of med school education. It isn't. It's just a pain in the ass.

    Find a city you can live happily in.

    Find a school whose main rotating hospital is a level 1 trauma center and provides tertiary care. Also look for a decent sized hospital - you get lots of referrals from the region and get to see some cool things.

    Consider what you may be interested in and find a hospital that has residencies in that program. This is somewhat of a difficult issue because there is a good chance that you will change your interests as you progress. However, should you end up liking one thing and they don't offer a residency at your home program, it may put you at a disadvantage when it comes time to apply. As an example, my program offers Plastics fellowships only, no residency. A couple of classmates are looking to match into integrated plastics and really must apply to outside programs. A neighboring school doesn't offer Derm, again students from that program must apply outside only. At very least, make sure the school offers a fellowship program so you can do home rotations and get letters of rec.
     
  19. Gibonius

    Gibonius Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,106
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Location:
    Suburban Sprawl Sector 3, Maryland
    What degrees did you end up with to land the job you have?

    Pretty sure GIb's mentioned elsewhere he has a PhD in synthetic chemistry, but I don't remember which field specifically (organic, inorganic, catalyst, etc. etc.). I may be wrong though.

    BS Chem, PhD in physical chemistry (gas phase spectroscopy and computational work).
     
  20. sofaking9000

    sofaking9000 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2011
    I'm in my 3rd year of med school now - I can offer only a little insight into the beginning phases of becoming a physician.

    The first two years are pretty boring and don't seem at all related to what you went to med school for. You sit in a class, occasionally go on little token visits to the hospital, and generally just read a lot. Many schools now record lectures, so you can pretty well get the first two years done on-line. It's pretty much all in preparation for the USMLE Step 1 Exam - once you get that out of the way, it's a big relief.

    Third year is much better - the hours are longer, but at least you're getting a taste of what you went to school for. I think my worst week was night float on OB/GYN, something in the range of 90 hours over one week of nights. Busy in its own right, but more so because you're still expected to attend lectures, conferences, read, prepare for exams, etc. in your "spare time."

    Even then, I don't think it is as bad as some make it out to be. Plenty of my classmates go out the the bars on their off days. There is lots of studying, but you learn to work it into your schedule at the appropriate time. I think LoMC's account may be a bit of a stretch.

    I'm getting ready to apply for orthopaedic surgery programs - as far as residency goes, new ACGME guidelines are capping next year's interns at no more than 16 hours per shift(this is true for all residencies) - that is actually less by a fair margin than I'm working on call days on my peds rotation. Residents at my program take call q5, arrive at the hospital around 6 and usually get out by 6 PM it seems. Most, if not all residents, are getting job offers by their 4th year of residency, just about everyone has a job lined up prior to graduation (unless they're doing a fellowship, which is more and more frequent).

    Edit - if you're interested in going to med school, a few pointers on what to look for when applying...

    PBL education style is the bane of all students' existence. It's touted as the new wave of med school education. It isn't. It's just a pain in the ass.

    Find a city you can live happily in.

    Find a school whose main rotating hospital is a level 1 trauma center and provides tertiary care. Also look for a decent sized hospital - you get lots of referrals from the region and get to see some cool things.

    Consider what you may be interested in and find a hospital that has residencies in that program. This is somewhat of a difficult issue because there is a good chance that you will change your interests as you progress. However, should you end up liking one thing and they don't offer a residency at your home program, it may put you at a disadvantage when it comes time to apply. As an example, my program offers Plastics fellowships only, no residency. A couple of classmates are looking to match into integrated plastics and really must apply to outside programs. A neighboring school doesn't offer Derm, again students from that program must apply outside only. At very least, make sure the school offers a fellowship program so you can do home rotations and get letters of rec.


    Alot of what you and LoMC are telling me is stuff I've never heard before. It seems to me that you figure this stuff out once you get there and if you aren't quick about it, you can end up screwing yourself royally. I just wish that Biology departments at colleges did a better job of providing a road map of how to get a final destination. Although, I've had no experience as I'm at a community college, hopefully my experience will be better next semester as a State school.

    Thanks for the advice guys [​IMG]
     

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