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Advantages of a $1000 Pair of Shoes

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by MCanavan6, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. hendrix

    hendrix Well-Known Member

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    this is actually nothing to do with me and I didn't bring up this debate.

    All I did was take issue with Gdot's argument that stylistic features are part of quality.

    I don't really care about gemming, except for myself as a consumer, since I know the difference I always choose handwelted shoes. This is because a) I can't afford to buy shoes and have them recrafted when they only should need a resole b) I like to support makers that do things the best way, not the easiest c) I also just don't like the look of most of the high end English shoes.


    Read through the thread and you'll see that I was only talking about my own spending habbits.

    I don't care what anyone else does.



    Absolutely, I agree.

    This is not why the debate was brought up (again).

    If someone asks me to make a recommendation and/or describe the various methods of shoemaking, you can't ask me to ignore the fact that one method is better than the other just to appease the insecure.

    And if someone asks me to evaluate and compare the quality of $1000 pairs of shoes I'm going to be honest.

    You'll see in my post I described the methods of shoemaking as I know them.

    I said "handwelting is better than GY welting", and it damn well is, there should be no debate here and I don't know why people continue to debate that.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  2. rikod

    rikod Well-Known Member

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    Honestly I don't understand very well, but just in case I'm no part of that, I respect Hendrix knowledge and I also think we have similar taste in shoes w some exceptions. A difference is I don't know one bit about shoe construction and I don't care, I care about leather quality, last and look in general, I just know that GY welted and hand welted shoes are generally well made and it's very unlikely that they will fail. Maybe I'm just easy on shoes, I have a pair of glued Ecco City shoes that I've been wearing a lot for 10 years and they are still in good shape.
     
  3. grendel

    grendel Well-Known Member

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    Yes, please do... I've learned a lot from these discussions and the linked discussions on hand welting, gemming (and the failure thereof), etc. I don't have any really high-end shoes yet but I'd be interested in making wise decisions when I get there. From what I've gleaned from this thread, Vass and St. Crispin are very well regarded for quality of materials and top-notch construction and are a good value for the quality they provide. True? I'm unlikely to be in a position to have bespoke shoes made in the near future, so what's my next best option?
     
  4. Liquidus

    Liquidus Well-Known Member

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    I've casually followed this thread and some of the specifics on shoemaking are lost on me, but are people saying that a pair of Vass is going to last twice as long as a pair of Carmina? Correct me if I'm wrong, but if you say that Vass are the best value, that would have to be true.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2012
  5. hendrix

    hendrix Well-Known Member

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    :facepalm:

    No.
     
  6. hendrix

    hendrix Well-Known Member

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    I can't answer this question because it all depends on what you can afford and also your aesthetic tastes; no matter how high quality a pair of shoes might be it won't matter if you don't like them or can't afford them.

    I've posted a rough description of shoe construction and each of the processes to evaluate.

    It's up to you to find research the shoes that you like, see how they're made, and see how much this matters to you.

    I've made a personal decision on what level of quality I require.
     
  7. grendel

    grendel Well-Known Member

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    Okay, so step us through your reasoning and what you chose.
     
  8. Patek

    Patek Well-Known Member

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    Because anything less is just a beater shoe.
     
  9. hendrix

    hendrix Well-Known Member

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    I already have stepped you through my reasoning. See quotes. I'm afraid you're going to have to come to your own choices because we are different people and are likely to value different things.






     
    1 person likes this.
  10. chogall

    chogall Well-Known Member

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    Beater shoe day today. JL City II.

    [​IMG]

    p.s., my rainy day beater would be G&G Canterbury cordovan boots.
    p.s.s., I only have beater shoes since I do not put any of my shoes in the closet glass display box to preserve their beauty. Maybe one day when I get my bespoke shoes...
     
  11. mcbrown

    mcbrown Well-Known Member

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    Wait, you mean we're supposed to wear our nice shoes?
     
  12. Xenon

    Xenon Well-Known Member

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    I think we scared the OP away . Good job :D
     
  13. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Well-Known Member

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    OP was scared off after page 1...
     
  14. Macallan

    Macallan Well-Known Member

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    we are only half way, enjoy the next 28 pages
     
  15. nepats81

    nepats81 Well-Known Member

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  16. Asarbillytaylor

    Asarbillytaylor New Member

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    Upgrade, raising the bar contribute to your overall health and most of all your Outlook.

    Billy Taylor
     
  17. Leaves

    Leaves Well-Known Member

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    You can get very good shoes for $500-600, shoes that will last you a lifetime, if you take care of them properly and keep a good rotation. The most pragmatic thing would probably be to find a maker you like in this price category, meticulously verify your size for a particular last and stock up up on a dozen pairs. You'd be set for life if you put some thought into the styles you acquire. Now, most people on this forum however do not buy shoes only because they need something to wear on their feet. Many people buy into a brand for the aesthetics. Some for the fascination of the craft. Some for prestige. Some because they fell in love with a girl who told them they look good in something. Some because they found a skilled salesman who knew how to pitch well. Any number of reasons. Why do people buy Ferraris, any Toyota will take you from point A to B. It's not about logics, it's about passion. Cliche I know. :happy:
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2015
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