or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Vass discontinuing US sales?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Vass discontinuing US sales? - Page 11

post #151 of 174
Quote:
Quote:
(Alexander Kabbaz @ April 10 2005,10:06) your theory (how many men of affluence are going to spend the requisite number of hours being fitted?) is probably the least significant consideration of all. For men truly of affluence, when, where, and how often lie within their purview to mandate for hundreds ... or thousands ... or even hundreds of thousands of people across the globe. When and where they have to be ... and who besides themselves needs alter their schedules ... to accomplish their goals are usually nothing more than a note left for the secretary. "Book me at the Regency on Wednesday" or "Send Kabbaz a check for his plane tickets" have less significance than something really important, like whether to have a bagel or a croissant for breakfast.
Men truly of affluence.  My god, that is pathetic.  I'd rather spend time with my son than be fitted for a shirt.  Sorry, pal.
agreed.
post #152 of 174
Quote:
"Fashionable" is merely a profit-driven concept designed to assure that shitty quality attains obsolescence prior to disintegration.
That is a brilliant sentence.
post #153 of 174
we seem to be tied up with the idea of celebrity tailors, cobblers, chiefs, who cater to the super rich. I am not taking anything away from Vass, but what is special about vass is that it is one of a few remaining stands of a skill set that was much more common 50 or 100 years ago. there are not that many skilled people willing to make shoes by hand anymore, and in many parts of the world those willing to want feel that they should earn similar to dentists or lawyers. should vass decide to make thousands of pairs of shoes available to the US market, they will have to change their standards, or raise their prices in order to recruit top people. it would change the whole nature of their business, and disrupt their lifestyle. part of the charm in life is finding artisans like this - the shirtmaker or tailor or cobbler or chief off the beaten track who make fantastic products and yet have not falen into the track of being a "celebrity". I can think of 50 places I would rather eat than some of the top resteraunts in New York, because I know I will get served by a good waiter and eat food by a good cook, not by somebody who is famous and feels he is doing me a favor.
post #154 of 174
Quote:
Men truly of affluence. My god, that is pathetic. I'd rather spend time with my son than be fitted for a shirt. Sorry, pal.
That's a false choice, and a snotty one at that. Very much akin to expressing outrage that the President is driven around in a limousine when there are children in this world who go to bed hungry.
post #155 of 174
Quote:
Maybe I'm just not rich enough to understand the nuances of the market or something, but I can't think of any products off the top of my head that are any MORE exclusive than hand made, full custom/bespoke. And the people who buy it know that.
The best things in life are free.
post #156 of 174
Quote:
Quote:
(johnapril @ April 11 2005,08:29) Men truly of affluence.  My god, that is pathetic.  I'd rather spend time with my son than be fitted for a shirt.  Sorry, pal.
That's a false choice, and a snotty one at that. Very much akin to expressing outrage that the President is driven around in a limousine when there are children in this world who go to bed hungry.
You think?
post #157 of 174
Quote:
I'd rather spend time with my son than be fitted for a shirt.
And I would rather spend time with my four sons than making a shirts. However, I can't spend time with them when I am doing business ... and neither can my clients, for whom being properly dressed is part and parcel of their doing business. You have found a dichotomy ... where there is none. And thank you for the compliment about my summation of fashion.
post #158 of 174
Quote:
Quote:
I'd rather spend time with my son than be fitted for a shirt.
And I would rather spend time with my four sons than making a shirts. However, I can't spend time with them when I am doing business ... and neither can my clients, for whom being properly dressed is part and parcel of their doing business. You have found a dichotomy ... where there is none. And thank you for the compliment about my summation of fashion.
Kabbaz, really, I thought your statement about fashion to be brilliant. If you make shirts as well as you turn a phrase, I have no doubts about your craftsmanship. And if ever I had nothing else to do (ie, my son, the kid, the one), I would attempt to schedule an appointment with you to discuss custom shirts.
post #159 of 174
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:
I'd rather spend time with my son than be fitted for a shirt.
And I would rather spend time with my four sons than making a shirts. However, I can't spend time with them when I am doing business ... and neither can my clients, for whom being properly dressed is part and parcel of their doing business. You have found a dichotomy ... where there is none. And thank you for the compliment about my summation of fashion.
Alex, I commend you for your patience in the face of such odd rudeness.
post #160 of 174
Quote:
Quote:
(Alexander Kabbaz @ April 11 2005,07:04) Quote I'd rather spend time with my son than be fitted for a shirt.
And I would rather spend time with my four sons than making a shirts. However, I can't spend time with them when I am doing business ... and neither can my clients, for whom being properly dressed is part and parcel of their doing business. You have found a dichotomy ... where there is none. And thank you for the compliment about my summation of fashion.
Alex, I commend you for your patience in the face of such odd rudeness.[/quote] So do I.
post #161 of 174
JA is certifiable. Kay Bert is a cop.
post #162 of 174
My 2 Euros: In a nutshell, some men go to bespoke makers because of their admiration for and appreciation of the art and craft of handmade clothes.  At the same time, however, I do think there are men who go to other bespoke makers to either be "cool", to be validated, or to enjoy bragging rights to boast of the pedigree or origin of their clothes, whether it be London, Savile Row, Rome, Milan, or wherever.  That said, in my mind, at least (Still too early for it to be functioning fully, so my apologies for any major gaffes), there are two general bespoke categories for the purposes of this debate: The famous bespoke houses, firms, and ateliers (or those in prestigious locations), and the more esoteric ones.  There are those who will go to the better-known establishments, such as Anderson & Shepperd, Huntsman, John Lobb, Turnbull, etc., for those bragging rights.  All quality clothes, but all, at the same time, denoting a definite cache.  For such men, it validates them to make mention their suits or shoes or shirts are from Anderson's or Lobb, or from Savile Row, or London, or mentioning it all in one breath if they're truly overbearing.  Then, there are those who patronize the less "glamorous" houses on Savile Row, such as Welsh---While a quality garment is the underpinning reason for patronizing Welsh, for some, they still enjoy mentioning their suit was made on Savile Row (Said with just the correct amount of lock-jaw).  Still others using the independent London tailors off the beaten path, or Row,  like to boast their suits are made in London, though usually not mentioning the specific names of their more obscure indy tailors.  Not all men, but there are many encompassed in this general category.   In the more esoteric category of bespoke makers who, for whatever reason, are not "name" brands, such as Raphael (tailor), Perry Ercolino (shoes), and for shirts, Alex Kabbaz (Relax, Alex, this is not intended as a knock against you), I'd concur with Alex that most, if not all, customers are using them because they like the results of what they make for them, not for bragging rights.  All three makers are in the New York area, which does not enjoy the same cache as, say, England or Italy (Maybe a bit more cache than Hungary, though, with all deference to the folks at Vass), and so there is not the same mystique in mentioning your clothes are made in Manhattan, East Hampton, or Doylestown, PA.  Such customers are more genuine and purer of intentions (again in my mind), in seeking the best of the best clothes (In their minds).  They don't have a need to bask in the reflected glory of the bespoke maker's fame, just bask in the admiration of those appreciating the clothes that they are wearing. Grayson
post #163 of 174
Marc there is a fourth category. You mentioned expensive and famous (e.g. Savile Row), less expensive with pseudo-fame (minor SR, off-Row), expensive and less widely known, but there are also those who are neither expensive nor widely known (Hong Kong tailors for instance). They provide good value to those who cannot afford a Kabbaz shirt. Mathieu
post #164 of 174
I think with my post I have opened another can of worms
Quote:
The idea that a business based on small, individual orders 'would not be welcome' is confusing to me.
Special orders would be welcome through a retailer, who stocks some styles, but we can't merely build a business on custom orders, unlike some English makers, who visit the states twice a year and charge $3200 and up for a pair of shoes, that is about 4 times more than our starting price (and that is a direct sale, with no retail store involved). Although I am looking into a possibility of a custom order program, not internet based.
Quote:
If you want to sell stock than you need to have stock here; and in depth
Ron, you know the business much better than I do, but I know one thing, none of the companies on Vass' level stock the shoes in depth, no Kiton, no Lattanzi. We do not have a few styles every season, the stores can choose from hundreds of variations all the time, which ones to stock? We do not require store buyers to buy ten styles; a shop can start out with 2-3 types.
post #165 of 174
Thank you Marc.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Vass discontinuing US sales?