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Adding a thin layer of rubber sole to leather-sole - Page 4

post #46 of 53
I was waiting for a reply like this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabiesinfrance View Post
Firstly, a stick-on rubber sole adds an extra layer to the leather sole which can affect the mechanical properties of the shoes and cause damage. The shoe is also less breathable.

I have done it before with great success. Don't mind a decrease in breathability - I'm convinced that snow, rain and slush absorbed by leather soles would make my feet more wet than the extra sweat that may stay due to the rubber.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabiesinfrance View Post
Secondly, if you get them repaired by 'Bob the builder' at the key cutters and engravers round the corner, you can't ensure that the work done is of good quality. If they balls it up, your shoes could be ruined. Only a madman would take his EG's to Timpson's.

My cobbler successfully re-soles C&J shoes and he is the best in my little town of half a million citizens, so no worries that he would ruin the shoes. Besides, we're talking £180 Alfred Sargents here, unlike C&J handgrade or EG etc. which are roughly twice as expensive or even more.

I know that many shoe connaisseurs would never put rubber on leather, but one has to be a bit practical when the weather conditions are bad.
post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by pebblegrain View Post
For rain water to absorb and transport through 9 layers of oak-tanned leather would take about a week of being completely submerged.

I've never even seen rain soak through more than the 2nd layer of a heel.

I lack experience from this but your comment seems reasonable.
post #48 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by CashmereLover View Post
I was waiting for a reply like this.



I have done it before with great success. Don't mind a decrease in breathability - I'm convinced that snow, rain and slush absorbed by leather soles would make my feet more wet than the extra sweat that may stay due to the rubber.



My cobbler successfully re-soles C&J shoes and he is the best in my little town of half a million citizens, so no worries that he would ruin the shoes. Besides, we're talking £180 Alfred Sargents here, unlike C&J handgrade or EG etc. which are roughly twice as expensive or even more.

I know that many shoe connaisseurs would never put rubber on leather, but one has to be a bit practical when the weather conditions are bad.

Those are the basic 'rules', I guess. I don't think I'd be too fussed about 'country' footwear which is going to get bashed about a fair bit anyway, or lower end shoes. I'd happily put stick-on soles onto a pair of Loakes or Barker. It will invalidate the repair policy with Barker, though!

At the lower end, paying £100 - £150 for a pair of shoes, it makes little sense to send them back to the maker for repair. Barker will charge you £85 a throw. It depends on how much you value your shoes. Like inkjet cartridges, eventually you'll spend more on the ink that the printer the ink came with. Another reason perhaps to buy better quality shoes if you afford them.

Not saying all cobblers are bad. Crockett & Jones in London use KoKo, I believe. If you ask for taps or a re-sole they'll be sent there. It's a little bit more to have them re-soled in the factory.
post #49 of 53
Alternatively, I really like the "country" offerings of the better english makers. It's one thing to slap some rubber on a delicate dress shoe, but, look at an AS country line blucher, it will have a dainite or other rubber sole to begin with in double-sole thickness, perhaps a storm welt, and perhaps a sturdier leather. To most people they look like any other dress shoe but they are built for navigating snow and rain just a little bit better than a plain dress shoe.
post #50 of 53
Ultimately, the shoe or boot is a practical thing and at the level of 'country' footwear you cross the line into solid, practical territory. It's one thing to sustain damage to a pair of business shoes in town and quite another to be out walking halway up a mountain in the middle of nowhere.

Take a look at the William Lennon website. This is the furthest extreme: boots made for farmers and tug or war enthusiasts! Boots that take some "real hammer" as it says on the website.

In England we still have the country thing going on and in county towns you still see old men in tweeds and brogues limping about. I know a chap who wear plus fours.
post #51 of 53

I just bought what I think is my first pair of actually really nice shoes.  Years ago, I bought a pair of Johnston Murphy captoe shoes for $360 which, looking back, I don't think are as nice as these.  Not knowing how to take care of them at the time, I allowed rain and snow to ruin the soles and damage the uppers.

 

After several years of mourning the loss of a few hundred dollars, I was content with spending less than a hundred each on a couple of pairs every year.  However, I recently fell in love with a pair of brown, two-toned Silvano Sassetti shoes.

 

Afraid of running into the same trap as last time, against the elements of the weather, I decided to get toe and heel taps added to them immediately.  Then, before every wearing them, I went back to the cobbler and had him put some rubber onto the soles, as well.  He showed me the material he would use, but I am not sure if they are Topy.  They are somewhat of a check design with more vinyl feel, than rubber. 

 

His work was impressive.  I don't even notice any addition when viewing from the sides.  However, I noticed that he seem to have scored the bottom... perhaps even removed a thin layer of the sole before he glued the rubber part to the sole.  The purpose of this, I suppose, is to make it flush with the rest of the leather sole.  Any comments about this?  Did he compromise my shoes?

 

Thanks.

post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by raggedsweater View Post

I don't even notice any addition when viewing from the sides.  However, I noticed that he seem to have scored the bottom... perhaps even removed a thin layer of the sole before he glued the rubber part to the sole.  The purpose of this, I suppose, is to make it flush with the rest of the leather sole.  Any comments about this?  Did he compromise my shoes?

bumping this as i would appreciate an answer for this.
post #53 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by triumphman View Post

bumping this as i would appreciate an answer for this.

Helps create a surface for the glue to bond.
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