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Adding a thin layer of rubber sole to leather-sole - Page 3

post #31 of 53
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First of all, the clicking sound (loud as a gunshot on some surfaces) can be annoying. Second, on marble or other slick surfaces, the foot can slip embarrassingly, and sometimes painfully if you completely lose your balance.  Third (not so common, but still), airport security people can entertain ... strange thoughts about such shoes.  Explaining them can sometimes take a while.  Fourth (and most important) I tend to wear out the toe quickly, too, but do so unevenly, especially on the right foot.  To get the necessary coverage, I would, I'm told, require a much large piece of steel than is generally advised or comfortable.  And the clicking would only get worse. I agree that the EG photos look great, which is why I was eager to try it.  Not the thing for me, though.  If the rubber solution doesn't work, I may nonetheless pledge allegiance to steel as the alternative to frequent, expensive resoling.
Manton, I've never had the problem of slippage on any of my bespokes with a tip. Do you 'drag' you toe more than normal? When Glasgow and Gaziano made your shoes, did they not also examine what you were wearing to discern your wear patterns? As for the 'clicking' sound, I do hear it sometimes, but only on very hard surfaces, like polished marble.
post #32 of 53
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Manton, I've never had the problem of slippage on any of my bespokes with a tip.  Do you 'drag' you toe more than normal?
I guess so.  It doesn't happen often, but often enough to be annoying.
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When Glasgow and Gaziano made your shoes, did they not also examine what you were wearing to discern your wear patterns?
Tony did, certainly, and suggested the rubber.  I gather he is not a big fan of steel.  He mentioned the slippage problem.  He also said he does not like to cut out the welt at the toe -- which is required if you want to put steel there -- as it is not good for the shoe.  It is much easier to put a steel plate at the heel, but the result is louder than artillery fire.
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As for the 'clicking' sound, I do hear it sometimes, but only on very hard surfaces, like polished marble.
I worked for many years in a building with long corridors, 20 foot ceilings, and diamond-hard floors.  I heard it, believe me. So did all my colleagues.
post #33 of 53
Originally posted by Manton:
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Tony did, certainly, and suggested the rubber. I gather he is not a big fan of steel. He mentioned the slippage problem. He also said he does not like to cut out the welt at the toe -- which is required if you want to put steel there -- as it is not good for the shoe. It is much easier to put a steel plate at the heel, but the result is louder than artillery fire.
I agree totally about the heel insert, noisy as hell, and that will certainly lead to slippage. Tony did mention his concerns regarding steel inserts to me, mainly concerning the possiblility of the welt stitches being cut when taking a slice out of the front of the sole... but he did say that EG had overcome that problem by using deeper (?) channel.
post #34 of 53
Agreed. I have put rubber halfsoles on my dress shoes for years. It dramatically improves the durability of the sole, and I have noticed no problems with heat or rot. I don't think that the leather etc. on the sole is very porous. I also add plastic/rubber taps on the heel and the toes. These need to be replaced fairly often, but it's better than having to replace the heels and rubber soles. -boston
post #35 of 53
I am doing an experiment now. I have a pair of Johnson & Murrphy shoes that I got from resale shop for $4. I took some Shoe Goo and spread a thin layer on the sole. It dries transparently. I will try them out and see how long the layer lasts.
post #36 of 53
I'll go ahead and bump this old thread as it was the most suitable that came up in my search on SF.

Here's the thing; I'm considering buying a pair of Alfred Sargent Chatham shoes but I would need to take them to my cobbler to get a Topy added on the leather sole.

The question is, do you think I need rubber on the whole sole (including the heel) or just the forepart? The Chatham has a full leather sole as seen on the picture in this Buying and Selling thread. My reasons for adding rubber on the forepart is that I will use these shoes in wet and possibly also slushy conditions, and I want to keep my feet reasonably dry. However, as the heel area of the shoe is made from many more layers of leather than the sole forepart, maybe the heel doesn't need rubber?

I suppose finding a shoe with a rubber sole from the very beginning would have been the best option, but the only rubber sole shoe I like (at least on Pediwear) is C&J Swansea, and it has two disadvantages compared to the AS Chatham: (1) Much more expensive* even if I include the cobbler cost for adding Topy, (2) the color of AS looks nicer.

* (£305 for C&J compared to about £180 for AS with my Pediwear shoe club discount)
post #37 of 53
I just get the forepart done. Never the heel. I put tacks on my heels. But is it up to you.
post #38 of 53
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Originally Posted by ter1413 View Post
I just get the forepart done. Never the heel. I put tacks on my heels. But is it up to you.

Sorry but I've never heard of "tacks", what is that? English isn't my native language.

Don't you think the gravel they put on the streets, when there's snow and slush, put too much wear and tear on the leather heels?
post #39 of 53
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Originally Posted by CashmereLover View Post
Sorry but I've never heard of "tacks", what is that? English isn't my native language.

Don't you think the gravel they put on the streets, when there's snow and slush, put too much wear and tear on the leather heels?

The piece of curved plastic that one gets put on the back/front of a show so that it does not wear out.
post #40 of 53
Thanks. I'll most likely go ahead and purchase those leather sole Alfred Sargents, then take them to my cobbler and ask him to fix them.
post #41 of 53
the AS should have a rubber plug on the outer corner of the heel? If so, you might as well just wait until the heel is worn down significantly. Once that is done you can ask the cobbler to replace the whole layer of the sole with rubber. It will look like Allen edmonds heel once its done.
post #42 of 53
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Originally Posted by ter1413 View Post
The piece of curved plastic that one gets put on the back/front of a show so that it does not wear out.

Thay are called taps or rubber heel plates.
post #43 of 53
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Originally Posted by pebblegrain View Post
the AS should have a rubber plug on the outer corner of the heel?

If so, you might as well just wait until the heel is worn down significantly. Once that is done you can ask the cobbler to replace the whole layer of the sole with rubber. It will look like Allen edmonds heel once its done.

Yes, according to the pictures the AS heel looks exactly like the C&J heel. I'm just a bit worried that 30-40 minutes of daily outdoor walking in rain and snow will make the leather heel absorb a lot of moisture and transport it to my feet.
post #44 of 53
Not advisable for two reasons. Firstly, a stick-on rubber sole adds an extra layer to the leather sole which can affect the mechanical properties of the shoes and cause damage. The shoe is also less breathable. Secondly, if you get them repaired by 'Bob the builder' at the key cutters and engravers round the corner, you can't ensure that the work done is of good quality. If they balls it up, your shoes could be ruined. Only a madman would take his EG's to Timpson's.
post #45 of 53
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Originally Posted by CashmereLover View Post
Yes, according to the pictures the AS heel looks exactly like the C&J heel. I'm just a bit worried that 30-40 minutes of daily outdoor walking in rain and snow will make the leather heel absorb a lot of moisture and transport it to my feet.

For rain water to absorb and transport through 9 layers of oak-tanned leather would take about a week of being completely submerged.

I've never even seen rain soak through more than the 2nd layer of a heel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabiesinfrance View Post
Not advisable for two reasons. Firstly, a stick-on rubber sole adds an extra layer to the leather sole which can affect the mechanical properties of the shoes and cause damage. The shoe is also less breathable.

wrong and wrong. There is no appreciable amount of "ventilation" going directly through 8mm of bark leather
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