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Showerheads - Page 4

post #46 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Thanks - never noticed that the pressure was low at the tap or sink but that's probably because pressure at the tap is not something that's very noticeable generally (or at least, not as noticeable as low shower pressure). That one is a hand shower so I guess I can check the head and tube fairly easily to see if there's clogging, rust or calcification. I don't know what the flow regulator look like so I'll probably stop there and call a plumber if that doesn't work.

If you can figure out what kind of shower head you have, I could probably tell you how to remove the regulator.
post #47 of 90
Since we are talking plumbing and TokyoSlim seems to be an expert, I am looking for some advice as I am building a new house.

My contract calls for plumbing as folows:

Supply lines to be 3/4" Aquapex by Wirsbo.
Laterals and risers are 1/2" Aquapex.
Waste lines shall be 4" schedule 40 PVC underground.

Any thoughts on this? Anything else I should be asking for?

As to bath fixtures, I am using a mix of the Grohe Concetto and Kohler Purist and Watertiles in the house. Is there anything you would recommend in that regard?

Thanks
post #48 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by CommercialDoc View Post
Since we are talking plumbing and TokyoSlim seems to be an expert, I am looking for some advice as I am building a new house. My contract calls for plumbing as folows: Supply lines to be 3/4" Aquapex by Wirsbo. Laterals and risers are 1/2" Aquapex. Waste lines shall be 4" schedule 40 PVC underground. Any thoughts on this? Anything else I should be asking for? As to bath fixtures, I am using a mix of the Grohe Concetto and Kohler Purist and Watertiles in the house. Is there anything you would recommend in that regard? Thanks
That seems pretty standard. No mention of manifolds though. Are you installing it as a tree and branch system (just like you would copper) or a manifold or hybrid system? I don't want to second guess anyone, but having a balanced pressure manifold or hybrid tree and branch system with local manifolds for high use areas like the kitchen and bathroom will ensure that you have equal water pressure to all the outputs in each area. You should ask about it if you don't know for sure. PEX is inexpensive, so its worth it to run extra lines. Assuming that you are going to have more than one WaterTile in your shower - make sure you have enough flow to power them. Remember that they use 2.5gpm EACH. 2 or 3 of them is going to eat up all your supply volume in a 1/2 inch pex pipe. With a manifold, you can have them run separately for the best, most equal pressure. Also, if you plan on enjoying long showers - maybe look into a small tankless water heater to power your water. If I had a great shower, running out of hot water would be incredibly depressing. Other than that, it seems like you've got a pretty nice setup coming your way. I want pictures when you are done!
post #49 of 90
I wonder if P.E.Guerin or Sherle Wagner make showerheads. Those two brands are rather pricey, but the aesthetic seems suited to the Zip's tastes.
post #50 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
You should get a gallon milk jug and cut a hole in the top the size of your shower head, and see how long it takes to fill it. I'm curious (and I bet you'll be surprised)

Aside from removing the flow regulator (assuming it has one) you could re-pipe your new beach house.
Do you know if it has steel, copper, CPVC, or PEX plumbing?

By the way, removing the regulator is not against the law. Its just against the law to sell the shower head after you remove it.

I tried it a few minutes ago and it literally takes seconds...I'll make a video of it Thursday as my day is completely free. I removed the head and I don't notice anything that looks like the regulators in the pictures above.

In regards to the plumbing of the beach I have no clue we had it inspected before closing and everything was said to be done right (has was built for us). We've only been there for two nights so far but I'll check into it when we go back later this month. If removing the regulator doesn't do anything I'm going to have to re-pipe it. I have really thick hair and it annoys the hell out of me showering with low pressure and feeling like I haven't washed all of the shampoo or conditioner out. The pressure was so low it was barely getting my liquid soap off.

I think it will end up having to be re-piped as the faucet in the bath had little pressure as well. I'm sure it'll be a fortune to re-pipe the house ...if/when I do so what do you recommend me using?
post #51 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KBW View Post
I tried it a few minutes ago and it literally takes seconds...I'll make a video of it Thursday as my day is completely free. I removed the head and I don't notice anything that looks like the regulators in the pictures above. In regards to the plumbing of the beach I have no clue we had it inspected before closing and everything was said to be done right (has was built for us). We've only been there for two nights so far but I'll check into it when we go back later this month. If removing the regulator doesn't do anything I'm going to have to re-pipe it. I have really thick hair and it annoys the hell out of me showering with low pressure and feeling like I haven't washed all of the shampoo or conditioner out. The pressure was so low it was barely getting my liquid soap off. I think it will end up having to be re-piped as the faucet in the bath had little pressure as well. I'm sure it'll be a fortune to re-pipe the house ...if/when I do so what do you recommend me using?
If it took less than 20 seconds, you probably don't have a water flow restrictor. Either that or your house pressure is jacked up way more than normal. (which is bad for some appliances) As for the beach house: You could have someone retrofit a pex line directly from your heater to your shower. That shouldn't be too incredibly expensive. And depending on the situation, it might help. Then again, it might just be an obstruction in the pipe, and its possible that it will either fix itself over time - or get worse depending on what it is. Isn't that a great answer? Its possible that a plumber got a little sloppy with the solder, and its blocking your waterflow. Or that there is something else right there in the shower wall blocking your pipes. Or it could be an air bubble. I've seen that happen too. trapped air somewhere in the line can cause inconsistent and low pressure. There are a lot of things it "might be". But if its your whole bathroom, and not just your shower, its definitely a pipe issue and not a shower head issue. Re-piping your shower *might* solve the problem, but nobody is really going to be able to tell you that for sure. The part that makes people cringe is usually tearing out the shower wall and starting over. I don't like telling people they should do it. I'm sure people don't like hearing it either. Is it your main bathroom? And how far away would you say the water heater is? I wonder if this is a planning issue or a workmanship issue. A new house really shouldn't be having a lot of pressure loss problems. I wonder if that bathroom is the end of the line on too-long a run of copper or something. Well, best of luck to you.
post #52 of 90
The bathroom I'm speaking of is the main. Tokyo it could be that it is too far away from the heater if that makes a difference. The water heater is towards the front of the house and the bathroom is at the very back corner of the house. The bathroom here that I use that has so much pressure has the heater literally directly above the shower upstairs. I've never paid much attention to the other two showers on the far end to see if there's a difference.
post #53 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by KBW View Post
The bathroom I'm speaking of is the main. Tokyo it could be that it is too far away from the heater if that makes a difference. The water heater is towards the front of the house and the bathroom is at the very back corner of the house. The bathroom here that I use that has so much pressure has the heater literally directly above the shower upstairs. I've never paid much attention to the other two showers on the far end to see if there's a difference.
That is likely part of the problem. Sounds like sort of a bad design if you ask me, It doesn't have a whole lot to do with your heater, but your heater is typically where the water main enters the building at. Or pretty close. That is where the pressure comes from. The further away you are from that point, generally, the lower the pressure is going to be. But I'm not really in any position to tell you for sure. I can't see the pipes or the layout. I am a fan of centralized utilities.
post #54 of 90
1) I got a Speakman showerhead after liking my experience at the W hotel in Wash. DC. Wasn't all that expensive, and is the first thing I install when I move into a new apartment. It's always better than whatever is already installed. Would love to upgrade more, but should do the entire bathroom - and I don't own the place, so why give the landlord an upgrade?

2) Anyone reading this who has NOT removed the little plastic thing from their showhead should do so. You just unscrewed the showerhead, take out the damn EPA mandated piece of plastic, and voila - more water coming through the showerhead. Fucking bureaucrats.
post #55 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
I hate those rain showerheads. It's part of the reason I stopped going to the W when I traveled a lot. You have to stand there like an idiot, scrubbing the soap off you while this enormous shower head piddles pitifully on your head.


Well, there's rain and there's rain:

http://www.trendir.com/archives/000483.html#head4

Personally, I think it should all be part of a system. Overhead, wall mount and gooseneck.
post #56 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
Or if you are a baller, you can get this.







Course, thats about $10k in just the fixture and enclosure costs alone, not including installation.

post #57 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
That seems pretty standard. No mention of manifolds though. Are you installing it as a tree and branch system (just like you would copper) or a manifold or hybrid system?

I don't want to second guess anyone, but having a balanced pressure manifold or hybrid tree and branch system with local manifolds for high use areas like the kitchen and bathroom will ensure that you have equal water pressure to all the outputs in each area. You should ask about it if you don't know for sure. PEX is inexpensive, so its worth it to run extra lines.

Assuming that you are going to have more than one WaterTile in your shower - make sure you have enough flow to power them. Remember that they use 2.5gpm EACH. 2 or 3 of them is going to eat up all your supply volume in a 1/2 inch pex pipe. With a manifold, you can have them run separately for the best, most equal pressure.

Also, if you plan on enjoying long showers - maybe look into a small tankless water heater to power your water. If I had a great shower, running out of hot water would be incredibly depressing.



Other than that, it seems like you've got a pretty nice setup coming your way.

I want pictures when you are done!

I've had very good luck using 1" copper with 3/4" going to each device. The set up has a manifold with an outlet for each device. IMO 1/2" tube should only be used as a bush at the device if it doesn't accept 3/4" not for runs.
post #58 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by yachtie View Post
I've had very good luck using 1" copper with 3/4" going to each device. The set up has a manifold with an outlet for each device. IMO 1/2" tube should only be used as a bush at the device if it doesn't accept 3/4" not for runs.

Can work very well, but depending on pressure and set up, can also create backpressure and strange fluctuations. Most standard mixing valves are set up for 1/2 inch in and out. Of course, ordering one that takes 3/4 isnt that hard, but its something you have to plan for in advance.
post #59 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
Can work very well, but depending on pressure and set up, can also create backpressure and strange fluctuations. Most standard mixing valves are set up for 1/2 inch in and out. Of course, ordering one that takes 3/4 isnt that hard, but its something you have to plan for in advance.

I've had no problems and getting away from the single source with branches to the devices solves the "flush toilet/get scalded" problem without a thermostatic mixing valve. My favorite is a single mixing valve and multiple dirvertors (for each showerhead).
post #60 of 90
When I read adjustable showehead I though immediately of a flexible one that you can fix to the wall or hold in your hand. None of the hotels in US have that nor most apartments /houses. I have no idea what sort of acrobatic contortions Americans perform in a shower in order to get themsleves clean.
How could one take a complete shower with showerhead permanently attached to the wall????
Also why the f---k every bathroom sink has a plug?
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