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Ask a Fitness Model - Page 40

post #586 of 962
Right now for example, I am doing UD2.0 and there's no way I would hit the nutritional partitions without protein shakes. In fact, Lyle pretty much told me that as a vegetarian, it would be very difficult for me to do UD2.0 but I am determined to prove him wrong.
post #587 of 962
i will argue that with the caloric deficit i've been running, i would never have preserved this much muscle without all the protein i'm eating, @ 325g/day
post #588 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by thekunk07 View Post
i will argue that with the caloric deficit i've been running, i would never have preserved this much muscle without all the protein i'm eating, @ 325g/day

So kunk you're still doing the CKD right? What role does the heavy protein intake play in all of this. Some of it is used for muscle synthesis but the rest....does the body use that for energy instead of breaking your muscles down? Does it subsequently slow down muscle breakdown? Or does it direct your body to use more fat for energy, or what.
post #589 of 962
yeah, theory being fat is being utilized as energy.
post #590 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by PolePosition View Post
Pretty interesting study results Lance. So how does one reconcile that with Turbozed's results?
Looks like those are referring to protein synthesis which is actually a different thing from increased muscle mass. There's a lot of confusion about the two.
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Would it be fair to say (assuming that both of the studies have accurate results) that while protein consumption is important in building muscle, with carbohydrate consumption and whey+casein consumption post-workout giving better results by slowing down muscle breakdown and stimulating synthesis than if one were to take nothing, that beyond a certain amount of protein per day, excess protein will not yield an additional increase in skeletal muscle synthesis?
Yes, that seems to be the same conclusion Brad Pilon made. Once minimal protein requirements are met, any additional amounts of protein consumed do not yield an increase in muscle mass. Excess protein ≠ increased muscle mass.
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That seems to be plausible. After all, the body can only repair and build up so much muscle tissue depending on how much resistance/strength training one does. Any additional calories taken in beyond your needs would just result in storage as fat correct or simply excreted as waste?...
Yes.
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that being the case how should one's diet be?
Whatever you want within reason. Eat real foods. Eat a wide variety of foods. Enjoy food. Eat a wide variety of different types of cuisine. I like Micheal Pollan's basic suggestion. "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants."
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How does one determine exactly how much protein you need?
70 - 120 grams per day is fine depending on your calorie intake and body weight.
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Furthermore, wouldn't taking in protein for your caloric needs (even if all of it is not used to synthesize muscle) be better than loading up on carbohydrates and fats (beyond what the body needs for cellular and tissue maintenance and repair and to replenish glycogen stores) which can easily be stored as fat?
Not necessarily. Carbohydrates are necessary and not always bad. Fats are necessary too. At least the "right" kinds are.
post #591 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scrumhalf View Post
Lance, your posts are very informative - thanks! I would like to see more details on what the vegetarian diet from the study looks like. I am vegetarian and there's no way I can protein without a lot of carbs coming along. If you take lentils, beans, etc. - the staple protein sources of vegetarians, they also come with a lot of carbs. There's virtually nothing in the vegetarian diet that's the equivalent of tuna or chicken or something like that - protein and some fat but little else. For me at least, supplementing with protein shakes is a must. For people who can eat meat, I agree that they could probably get all the protein they need with normal food.

Sorry my man, but apparently even you do not have to supplement your diet with protein shakes.

Here's Brad's answer to your question:

Quote:
Q: I'm a vegetarian, does this mean I need to eat tofu or take protein
powders?

No. You might not realize it but there is lots of protein in foods like multigrain
bread, pasta, grains, nuts, legumes and beans. Be sure to make mixed meals
that include a variety of vegetarian foods, this will ensure that each meal
provides the full spectrum of amino acids.
post #592 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
No, it's because your training program is designed around looking cool in the gym.

far from it my clueless friend.My goal is to achieve overall balance and symmetry,that is why i admire physiques like frank zane,surge nubret and early flex wheeler...but i am limited by my structural deficiencies
post #593 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShyBoy View Post
far from it my clueless friend.My goal is to achieve overall balance and symmetry,that is why i admire physiques like frank zane,surge nubret and early flex wheeler...but i am limited by my structural deficiencies

You're an idiot and proved my point.
post #594 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShyBoy View Post
i assure you fatboy,i do
Doesn't really prove anything but nice shirt. Edit: btw, do you have the source for that prison study? I'm very curious about it. Thx in advance
post #595 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by lance konami View Post
Yes, protein is necessary, but even vegetarians get enough protein to build muscle. Here's an interesting study taken from "How Much Protein"

Can you link me to any of the studies on pubmed?

I'm a little demanding on my sources, and for the first study I'd like to know what exercises they're doing and how long they were on the program. For example, if they were doing curls and calf-raises and all gained 5 lbs total lean mass over the course of 5 weeks, then this proves nothing.

The second program doesn't really doesn't prove much since 120g of protein is still on the high scale and is a few times more than an average person consumes. Also, it really doesn't apply to most people since I assume we're not on steroids and that's one factor that's hard to ignore.

In any case, 70g+ of protein is a pretty good number and I'm surprised vegetarians can stay above that daily without much trouble (considering I used to eat less protein than that on my high-carb diets).
post #596 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShyBoy View Post
far from it my clueless friend.My goal is to achieve overall balance and symmetry,that is why i admire physiques like frank zane,surge nubret and early flex wheeler...but i am limited by my structural deficiencies
don't mind why, he's probably one of those guys that squats in the curl rack btw, how'd u get such jakt veins in ur arms bro?!
post #597 of 962
frank zane's music by his band, In Zane, is next level.
post #598 of 962
Zane is the one of my favorites as well. Here he is at age 60! May we all look half as good at that age!!
post #599 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by turbozed View Post
Can you link me to any of the studies on pubmed?

Your request involves too much work on my part. I suggest you just buy the ebook and do as much research on the studies cited as you want.
post #600 of 962
Lance, which ebook are you referring to? Maybe you mentioned it earlier in the thread - I browsed back a few pages but couldn't find it - probably my error but if you have a link handy, I would appreciate if you could post. Thx!
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