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Ask a Fitness Model

post #1 of 962
Thread Starter 
I'm a bit bored and reading through some of the threads here hurts my soul (some good advice mind you, but some is absolutely atrocious).

I'm a 22 year old college student and I do fitness modeling part time. I've been a forum member for quite a while, so this is obviously not my usual account. I'm a personal trainer, though that counts for little these days. I'm also a sports nutritionist and have managed a supplement store when I'm on breaks and work as a consultant while I'm at school. I started training when I was 18 and weighed 122 pounds at 5'10. I've been as heavy as 195 before I suffered a back injury from a non-gym related accident. I generally hover around 160-175 these days with between 8-12% bodyfat. I've been as low as 5-6, but certainly feel better in the 8+ range.

I'll try to answer any short questions about diet, nutrition, supplements, or general health, though I can't promise to know everything. I like the basics because they've worked before and they still do (training, nutrition, and supplements). Anyone asking for an entire routine will get the standard "big 6" answer (squat, deadlift, bench press, pull-ups, dips, and military press). And as for nutrition, I am an advocate of 5-7 small meals per day. I also believe in carb cycling and proper carbohydrate timing in line with insulin sensitivity.

Shoot.
post #2 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir. View Post
I'm a bit bored and reading through some of the threads here hurts my soul (some good advice mind you, but some is absolutely atrocious).

I'm a 22 year old college student and I do fitness modeling part time. I've been a forum member for quite a while, so this is obviously not my usual account. I'm a personal trainer, though that counts for little these days. I'm also a sports nutritionist and have managed a supplement store when I'm on breaks and work as a consultant while I'm at school. I started training when I was 18 and weighed 122 pounds at 5'10. I've been as heavy as 195 before I suffered a back injury from a non-gym related accident. I generally hover around 160-175 these days with between 8-12% bodyfat. I've been as low as 5-6, but certainly feel better in the 8+ range.

I'll try to answer any short questions about diet, nutrition, supplements, or general health, though I can't promise to know everything. I like the basics because they've worked before and they still do (training, nutrition, and supplements). Anyone asking for an entire routine will get the standard "big 6" answer (squat, deadlift, bench press, pull-ups, dips, and military press). And as for nutrition, I am an advocate of 5-7 small meals per day. I also believe in carb cycling and proper carbohydrate timing in line with insulin sensitivity.

Shoot.

How about a limited morning routine? I have a set of dumbbells, a swiss ball, handles for elevated push-ups and 15 - 20 minutes in the morning...
post #3 of 962
Thread Starter 
how heavy are the dumbbells? full set? goals?
post #4 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir. View Post
(some good advice mind you, but some is absolutely atrocious).
I concur.

What is your opinion of someone weighing 183 pounds, at 5'8", eating 1000 calories per day, while training twice each day? Would you consider this method practical, or would one be unnecessarily sacrificing LBM to lose fat?
post #5 of 962
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Titleist View Post
I concur. What is your opinion of someone weighing 183 pounds, at 5'8", eating 1000 calories per day, while training twice each day? Would you consider this method practical, or would one be unnecessarily sacrificing LBM to lose fat?
Though I'm not feeling like loading my software up, I would guess with 2 training sessions, presumably 1 hr each, calories would need to be in the 2800-3200 range (edit: this is a low estimate if you're trying to build any muscle at all). Figure 500 kcals/day under maintenance plus a bit of cardio a few times per week to lose an optimal amount of fat and maintain LBM. 1.5-2.5 lbs/week. Any more than that and there's no way it's all fat unless you're on clen + winny + t3 or something similar to help maintain. in any case 1k calories is a joke...
post #6 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir. View Post





Though I'm not feeling like loading my software up, I would guess with 2 training sessions, presumably 1 hr each, calories would need to be in the 2800-3200 range (edit: this is a low estimate if you're trying to build any muscle at all). Figure 500 kcals/day under maintenance plus a bit of cardio a few times per week to lose an optimal amount of fat and maintain LBM. 1.5-2.5 lbs/week. Any more than that and there's no way it's all fat unless you're on clen + winny + t3 or something similar to help maintain. in any case 1k calories is a joke...

I sure hope the poster was being facetious. Many folk here (as well as at most gyms) do not understand that severe calorie deficit and working out hard do not play well together at all. It is a major reason why newbies get discouraged and quit. Slow, steady, and patient is the formula.
post #7 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by marc237 View Post
Slow, steady, and patient is the formula.

+1

You have the rest of your life to work on your physique. The prevailing logic is that you don't get fat in a week or a month. It took time to put it on and will take time to take it off. Most people want a quick fix though, not a lifestyle change.

Noir. - What do you think of the stronglifts 5x5 or Rippetoe's programs? Both involve the big 6, short of dips. Would you classify dips as an essential routine exercise?
post #8 of 962
Thread Starter 
The only real constant is consistency. If you eat reasonably well, work out regularly (proper workouts...), and binge only occasionally, you will have a reasonable physique you can be proud of in time. Obviously genetics play into this a lot (some people look amazing after 1 year. Others, myself included, take significantly more time to build a decent base), but the key is that there is absolutely no magic formula. Hard work and dilligence. Whenever I have a new client in the store and they're looking for a fat burner, I sit down with them and try to discuss their goals and what they want to look like. Generally they say "I want to be skinnier and healthier." So I recommend a protein based on their goals, a vitamin, and typically glutamine. I always finish by saying "Looking good isn't easy. If it was, everyone would look amazing. It's hard work but if you want it badly enough, it pays off in spades." note: fat burners do work, and they can help. But stick with it for 3 months or more and use them for a few weeks to a month when you get to a sticking point. Supplements aren't a crutch for poor diet and exercise.
post #9 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir. View Post
So I recommend a protein based on their goals, a vitamin, and typically glutamine.

is glutamine something most people who lift regularly should be taking post-workout?
post #10 of 962
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiscogooner View Post
Noir. - What do you think of the stronglifts 5x5 or Rippetoe's programs? Both involve the big 6, short of dips. Would you classify dips as an essential routine exercise?

Both are really nice beginner programs, but I wouldn't do them alone to start with (meaning have a partner).*** iirc, rippetoe has dips as an optional exercise towards the end of the workout. Are both of these based on Bill Starr's? I know rippetoe had some backlash about that before. I would change a few things about the programs depending on what equipment I had available.

I generally recommend 3 workouts per week for beginners, and typically full body routines. The rationale being there are no weak points when there is no base to work from, and quite simply the big lifts put on the most muscle in the shortest amount of time. They can also work well in circuit fashion for fat loss, but obviously strength gain suffers without rest between sets.

Past beginner stages I have grown to prefer the 6-8 rep range and it's been reasonably good to me so far. (i.e. if you hit failure at 5, lower the weight. if you hit failure (and are HONEST with yourself about it...) at 9 or higher, raise the weight.)

***The only issue I have with the programs is the tendency to try and do too much weight because they are strength programs. I like the thought behind it because a certain level of strength is necessary to build any appreciable muscle mass, but NOT to the detriment of proper form. Squats and deadlifts are particularly dangerous if form isn't correct.

And typically, yes, I would classify dips as an essential exercise. This assumes there are no outstanding shoulder or rotater cuff problems of course, but I am definitely a fan of the exercise.
post #11 of 962
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiscogooner View Post
is glutamine something most people who lift regularly should be taking post-workout?

People will disagree with me on this, but I like glutamine. I generally do 2-4 shakes per day depending on how busy I am (less time than a meal), and each shake has 5g of glutamine added to it. It's the most abundant amino acid in the solid muscle tissue and I honestly feel like I am sore for a shorter amount of time when I supplement it. Most who take it in high doses tend to agree with this assessment. Glutamine is also essential in immune function, which may increase the risk of catching a cold or getting sick for people who work out and don't supplement it.

So yes, I would take it post workout but also throughout the day. Of note I guess is glutamine is absorbed by the receptors in your intestines before protein, so ideally you would take glutamine 15 minutes before you take your shake. But that's too much work so I say screw it. I've tried it before for about 2 months and didn't notice a difference, and certainly not a big enough one to merit the time wasted.

Just don't take it by itself. It tastes like ass.
post #12 of 962
How'd you get into fitness modeling? Is the pay good?
post #13 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir. View Post





Though I'm not feeling like loading my software up, I would guess with 2 training sessions, presumably 1 hr each, calories would need to be in the 2800-3200 range (edit: this is a low estimate if you're trying to build any muscle at all). Figure 500 kcals/day under maintenance plus a bit of cardio a few times per week to lose an optimal amount of fat and maintain LBM. 1.5-2.5 lbs/week. Any more than that and there's no way it's all fat unless you're on clen + winny + t3 or something similar to help maintain. in any case 1k calories is a joke...
Again, I agree. My post was just to further illustrate how misinformed so many are.
Quote:
Originally Posted by marc237 View Post
I sure hope the poster was being facetious. Many folk here (as well as at most gyms) do not understand that severe calorie deficit and working out hard do not play well together at all. It is a major reason why newbies get discouraged and quit. Slow, steady, and patient is the formula.
I was indeed. My post was in reference to this thread, where (some) members justified the thread-starter's unhealthy regimen. I definitely do not advocate this extreme form of training and dieting. One's ultimate goal should be health, and this method directly conflicts with that objective.

It should be a prerequisite to read, and re-read, your last sentence prior to beginning any fitness-related activity.
post #14 of 962
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by captainmo View Post
How'd you get into fitness modeling? Is the pay good?
I had a client I was working with in preparation for a bodybuilding show who had done some modeling before and introduced me to a few photographers. They liked me and asked if I was interested. I was bored and in okay shape already so I figured what the hell. The pay was terrible but it was a lot of fun and the girls I shot with were beautiful. I'm sure the top guys do okay, but it's more for shits and giggles. I don't have the face to expect more than a little bit of fun during the process.
post #15 of 962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir. View Post
how heavy are the dumbbells? full set? goals?


The dumbbells are chrome plated with spin-lock collars. I can set them to almost any reasonable weight.

Goals? Get in shape. Lose fat. Gain muscle. Feel better.

5'7" and overweight (165 lbs).
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