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Hidden inseam - Page 3

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
(Whodini: Seriously, take a hint and get out of this thread. As much fun as it is to be a dick on the Internet, do it in DT or something.)

post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini View Post
You really do have a problem defending yourself on putdowns, huh? Now say something clever like, "WHOdini? More like BITCHdini."**

**Marked for later use.
post #33 of 48
your jeans costing $280+ doesn't mean they are high quality
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
Both those jeans I pictured had retail prices above $280. (Whodini: Seriously, take a hint and get out of this thread. As much fun as it is to be a dick on the Internet, do it in DT or something.)
A spoonful of sugar...
post #35 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post
your jeans costing $280+ doesn't mean they are high quality

I know, but I guess Somets must be crappy based on what's said here...something is amiss.
post #36 of 48
Train tracks are selvage seam fades, I thought.
post #37 of 48
you thought correctly
post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ken View Post
I was going to say this but wasn't 100% positive, so I held off... until now:

flat felled seams are a sign of crappy jeans. They're everywhere because manufacturers have automagic folders that automate the process. They're not as stong as the serged busted seam that's stitched on top of itself (can't remember what it's called) that's standard on quality jeans. Flat felled seams are avoided on highly loaded items.

Some uber-cheap jeans will use flat-felled seams on the inseam AND outseam.

Hey everybody, guess what? APC uses flat-felled seams.

Flat felled seams are more of a design choice than cheaping-out. It gives a clean finish. The difference in cost when in mass production to an inseam that has the classic overlocked + edge stitch finish is negligible.

Felling is not by any means "the sign of crappy jeans". And is probably the strongest way to finish a seam - hence it's use on the back rise & yoke in jeans and also on the outseam of many workpants.

In contrast, the 'busted seam' or where the selvedge seam is pressed open is probably the weakest of seams.
post #39 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringring View Post
Felling is not by any means "the sign of crappy jeans". And is probably the strongest way to finish a seam - hence it's use on the back rise & yoke in jeans and also on the outseam of many workpants.

I really don't think this is true. I hear all the time about how felled seams are the strongest type of seam, with the reasoning mostly being, "well, just look at all that fabric tied up in there!" But I've never seen any empirical evidence that they're stronger than a lapped seam, and the argument does exist among top textile manufacturers.

What I do know is this: most of the jeans espoused to be of highest quality around here have lapped inseams. None of my high quality camping gear (tents, bags) use felled seams, and I've also heard that they're avoided on sails and parachutes.

I also know that strength is a moot point, as you implied. If a seam is going to fail on a pair of jeans, it will be the outseam.

The last thing I know is that felled seams are cheap to produce and are friggin' ugly as hell (which is why this thread was started in the first place, no?), so much so that brands like APC and Nudie try to hide the fact that they use felled seams by using indigo thread on one of the stitches.

For what it's worth, I have seen failed flat-felled seams. They occur on the felled outseam of jeans that were probably purchased at Wal-Mart. This may have to do with the quality of things purchased at Wal-Mart, but the chances of seeing a failed lapped seam are much slimmer because cheap jeans don't use lapped seams.
post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringring View Post
hence it's use on the back rise & yoke in jeans and also on the outseam of many workpants.
Also, for what it's worth, I have had a pair of jeans with a lapped yolk. They were a pair of Agave, and, honestly, I've only owned a couple pairs of jeans since that I felt were constructed better (RRL being one). I'm not trying to start an argument. You know a helluva lot about jeans (and it's good to see you posting again). I just don't really like why very much.
post #41 of 48
I really don't think this is true. I hear all the time about how felled seams are the strongest type of seam, with the reasoning mostly being, "well, just look at all that fabric tied up in there!" But I've never seen any empirical evidence that they're stronger than a lapped seam, and the argument does exist among top textile manufacturers.

What I do know is this: most of the jeans espoused to be of highest quality around here have lapped inseams. None of my high quality camping gear (tents, bags) use felled seams, and I've also heard that they're avoided on sails and parachutes.


I'm sure if you took the time, you could conduct your own experiment to see the strength differences between a lapped and felled seam. If not, then employing the services of an independent testing agency such as http://www.sgs.com would settle it

I'm sure it would only take a few clicks on google to find ample evidence that fell seams have been used for both sails and parachutes. There's evidence that fell seams were used as long ago as the Viking era for sails.

http://www.madehow.com/Volume-5/Parachute.html

The last thing I know is that felled seams are cheap to produce and are friggin' ugly as hell

That's just personal taste. Personally, I beg to differ.

For what it's worth, I have seen failed flat-felled seams. They occur on the felled outseam of jeans that were probably purchased at Wal-Mart. This may have to do with the quality of things purchased at Wal-Mart, but the chances of seeing a failed lapped seam are much slimmer because cheap jeans don't use lapped seams.

I think that's a classic case of Confirmation Bias (the tendency to interpret limited information to re-enforce one's prejudices). Unless you have seen felled seams consistently fail where other seams have held, then seeing a pair or two of Wall-Mart jeans fall apart is nothing.
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ken View Post
Also, for what it's worth, I have had a pair of jeans with a lapped yolk. They were a pair of Agave, and, honestly, I've only owned a couple pairs of jeans since that I felt were constructed better (RRL being one). I'm not trying to start an argument. You know a helluva lot about jeans (and it's good to see you posting again). I just don't really like why very much.
Lapped seams and open seams are regularly used in the yoke of womens jeans too - they sit flatter than fell seams, so are perceived to provide a neater fit. Not stronger. I'm not trying to argue either and respect your aesthetic choice regarding fell seams. Thank you also for the welcome back.
post #43 of 48
I, whacked, approve of this thread.


Both ken and ringring should post moar.
post #44 of 48
^ agreed and seconded. Great to see you posting again ringring. Welcome back!
post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringring View Post
I'm sure if you took the time, you could conduct your own experiment to see the strength differences between a lapped and felled seam.

I'm way ahead of you. But they'll have to be straight stitched, because I don't have a chain stitch machine.


They say they use a French fell seam, but the picture they show looks like a flat-fell seam. I know the construction of the two are different... not sure about the strength.
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