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Vegas Restaurants - Page 6

post #76 of 94
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Originally Posted by Xericx View Post

Its a bit touristy, but I've really enjoyed having dinner outside everytime I've gone to Mon Ami Gabi at Paris. Steak frittes weren't bad.

Eiffel tower is jean joho of everest. The patio at mon ami Gabi is awesome.. Great view of the fountains and you can hear the music
post #77 of 94
Okay, need help. We'll be there two weeks from Friday. So, Friday night is Aquaknox. No foie. Saturday night is Bouchon's. Their foie is a torchon and was not happy with it last time I was there. So where can I walk into for a glass of wine and foie, preferably in the Venetiaon complex? Maybe Pinot Brasserie?
post #78 of 94
Go across the street to Guy Savoy. If Alex were still in the Wynn, I'd suggest that... I have not found the dining in the Venetian that exciting.
post #79 of 94
Speaking of the Wynn, never been in there. We've got those fancy seats for the early show of Le Reve. Will head over a few hours early to explore. Any good walk in places there to have a glass and some nosh?
post #80 of 94
It's very steaky.... La Cave looks good... but as a non-wine drinker, I've never been there. Quite honestly, I do not eat there much, except for the buffet occasionally. I ate at one of the azn places once (not wing lei) and was very underwhelmed. Too bad boulud and takashi yagihashi are no longer there.

BTW - Bouchon is still my favorite place in Vegas - but I forget it's in the Venetian sometimes.
post #81 of 94
Was in Vegas this past week, and went to Kabuto on the recommendation of a sushi chef I know in Atlanta (Tomo). Anyway, outstanding, edomae-style omakase. Price is reasonable considering the splurges people make in the area, and the fish is flown in daily. It's a little hard to locate, as it's got this secretive thing going on (i.e., no signage), but it's worth the trip and it's on Yasuda level in my book!
post #82 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoRon View Post

It's very steaky.... La Cave looks good... but as a non-wine drinker, I've never been there. Quite honestly, I do not eat there much, except for the buffet occasionally. I ate at one of the azn places once (not wing lei) and was very underwhelmed. Too bad boulud and takashi yagihashi are no longer there.

BTW - Bouchon is still my favorite place in Vegas - but I forget it's in the Venetian sometimes.

Very necro but had a great experience at La Cave, Ron. Somm was fantastic and we totally connected, had a great bottle of wine, and some fine buffalo carpaccio prior to the show.

Will be in Vegas first week of May. The main gastronomic stop is reservations at L'Atalier. Really looking forward to this.
post #83 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Very necro but had a great experience at La Cave, Ron. Somm was fantastic and we totally connected, had a great bottle of wine, and some fine buffalo carpaccio prior to the show.

Will be in Vegas first week of May. The main gastronomic stop is reservations at L'Atalier. Really looking forward to this.

I went to Scarpetta for my sister's b-day just before Passover on my last trip. Was okay. Never really cared to go in NYC - that should have been my clue. But it hit a nice price point since I was buying for 4, and we were staying in the Cosmo. Still, would not recommend.

You will love L'atelier. I still think it's blasphemy not to go to Sage.
post #84 of 94
We are going with another couple and the night we're going to Robuchon's is a solo night so you can understand we're not getting Sage in this visit. We're also doing the VIP Champagne seating at Le Reve that night. I've been wanting to try Aureole and I've got them talked into that so I'm happy and I think it will be fun.
post #85 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

We are going with another couple and the night we're going to Robuchon's is a solo night so you can understand we're not getting Sage in this visit. We're also doing the VIP Champagne seating at Le Reve that night. I've been wanting to try Aureole and I've got them talked into that so I'm happy and I think it will be fun.

I understand- put it on your list for next time.
post #86 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoRon View Post

I understand- put it on your list for next time.

I'll be back in Sept. Meet me there.
post #87 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by paeday View Post


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On a more national level should those from the Northeast only eat striped bass, fluke, porgy?West coasters can only eat yellowtail, corvina, rockfish? No wild king or sockeye salmon for us east coast folks? Those from Mich. can only eat bass, walleye, perch, and pike? Much like fruits, vegtables, meats, cheeses (okay I am a little overextending here), I think there are some things that I appreciate from other parts of the world that I may not be able to get here easily or at all.


I will tell you, many people, even those in the culinary world have somewhat of a limited knowledge of the fish species. I am a strange person in that I am crazy about it because I fish quite a bit for fun all across the world and have a little background on marine fisheries science. There are subtle differences even within species within the same family. Here in the southeast our "glory" fish are mostly grouper and snapper. 99% of the popluation could not tell the difference from red snapper, vermillion, mutton, cubera, or mangrove snapper but to some people there is a difference (taste, fat content, flake, etc)....enough so that some people will pay more for it.


Another example is scamp grouper but most of you will never see it because there is no demand for it since most people think grouper is grouper. I will tell you that it is hoarded by those locals and the few regional chefs who can appreciate the fact that the flesh is of much high quality than the other available grouper. Another one is yellowedge grouper (which I am beginning to see labled as such in some places). Unfortunately, when word gets out people only want that fish and you get overfishing and mislabeling. Monkfish and triggerfish are both delightful but there was little demand so they were cheap and underfished here in the US until more recently they have become overfished in some parts. The New Orleans chef Paul Prudomme(sp) made redfish trendy with his blackened redfish dish and that fish needed federal protection after decimation from severe overfishing that came abruptly when demand came up. It was considered trashfish by many before then. Cobia is another fish to which I think there is no real sub. The list of such fish goes on and on.


Marketing plays a huge role in the fish that we know about and what people are willing to pay for and eat. There is not enough red snapper to go around so much of it is not even really red snapper but other species and you know what..... most people could not even tell the difference. Especially since the preferred presentation of market fish are in the form of fillets deception is common in the industry. Of course if all the fish sold as red snapper was really red snapper that would pretty much destroy that fishery (it happened to swordfish). Interestingly, one of my charter capts. asked if he could take some of our catch home for dinner. He left the red snappers and took home the mangrove snapper.




Sorry for the long post I just wanted to explain some viewpoints.......

Not to derail more but . With a background as a fish biologist (marine) , you're on the mark with a number of assertions. Firstly that the basic knowledge of fish in the culinary world is often woefully inadequate, even in high-end seafood restos.

Second is on scamp- exceptional fish. one of the reasons I think it's not widely available is that scamp do not congregate like red or gag grouper. They are more solitary so putting together a substantial catch is more difficult. The opposite is true for yellowedge, which are abundant. the problem there is that they are very deep water fish and the commercial market is small for them.

I catch triggerfish often and they are excellent. So are white grunts, margate, and most smaller reef fish.

And mangrove snapper > red snapper
post #88 of 94
For an excellent way-old school Vegas Italian restaurant head off the Strip to Casa Di Amore, on Tropicana, They even have a complimentary limousine which will pick you up from the Strip.
post #89 of 94
We were in Vegas a few weeks ago. We got in around 9:30P on our first night and had a 10:30 reservation at L'Atelier. It was awesome. With the exception of the lobster carpaccio (I don't like raw shellfish), every course was great. The langoustine and scallop were the highlights, and were the best preparation of either that I've ever had. Piob, I'm pretty sure you told me you've been to Joel Robuchon at the Mansion, and the waiters at L'Atelier told me the food is the same, it's just the setting and service that are different. The setting is obviously pretty casual, but it's friendly and attentive. I think the tasting menu and wine pairings are a great value (I think it was $159 + 105) for 9 courses and 5 wines.

The second night we went to Picasso. We had a great experience last time and thought it was a great value so we returned. I had the tasting menu again, which featured three (of five) of the same dishes as the last tasting menu. All were very well prepared and it's a great place to go once, but don't bother returning. Of note, I was really disappointed with the wine pairings, particularly with the Turbot. They served a white rioja that I couldn't finish...it tasted like bug spray smells.

The last night we went to Sage. My wife and I created our own tasting menu from the a la carte menu. Most of the courses were very good, but this was the heaviest food I've eaten in Vegas. I came away from dinner there kind of regretting it. It's partially my fault, each dish was much larger than I'm accustomed to at a restaurant of its quality. We're talking Cheesecake Factory-like portions. The foie gras brulee was the most disappointing foie of the three nights we were there and the scallops were way overseasoned. I didn't do the wine pairing there, I had champagne with the appetizers and pinot noir by the glass with the main courses.
post #90 of 94
Thanks for the heads up, HS. I had a friend recently go to L'Atelier and he liked that carpaccio but I remember thinking I would probably pass on that.

The other couple we're going with went to Carne Vino a few years ago and he still talks about it in awe. I really enjoyed the lunch you and I had there with the wives and might try to lure the other couple back for a lunch. That waiter we had so reminded me of Billy Joel it isn't funny.
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