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Olive Oil - Page 4

post #46 of 88
i use lucini for salad dressings and coconut oil for cooking
post #47 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by medwards View Post
I had the opportunity to talk with Harold McGee about the use of oils in cooking whilst he was in Washington on Monday. It was rather timely inasmuch as that was to be the topic of his New York Times Curious Cook column the next day. The bottom line is that heat has a very marked impact on the taste of cooking oils, reducing their flavor to the point where they more or less taste the same. Even the University of California at Davis experts on olive oil taste that he enlisted in his taste test were struck by the lack of a distinction between oils when used in cooking (that is, when the oils were heated, not drizzled etc). The surprise, McGee noted, was that they were surprised inasmuch as they were all aware that heat is used in processing specifically to remove aroma and taste! That is not to say there are not other differences, including the smoking point between refined and unrefined oils, but the choice of which olive oil to use for sauteing or frying will have little impact on the taste of the dish.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/17/di...%20cook&st=cse

Anybody read McGee's new book?
post #48 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christofuh View Post
Few makers are willing to disclose on product label whether or not the content is a blend or a straight oil based on a single variety olives.
I just hate being kept in the dark. Many of the cheap "extra virgin olive oils" sold via supermarket chains are, in fact, blends made up of oils collected from - literary - all over the freaking map.
You may find oils from Tunisia, Spain, Turkey and Greece packed in the same bottle.
Even blends constituting a collection of various oils from the same house don't always come out great.
I had one such oil by Colonna (mid to higher tier brand) whose flavor was flatter than Kansas.
Despite the fact that food critics generally pee themselves over Colonna extra virgin olive oil.

the olive oil business is very, very slippery (pun intended). basically, find an oil you like and stick with it; don't worry about whether it's labeled extra-virgin ... those labels can be almost entirely fraudulent. and don't even get started on point-of-origin labeling ... european oils are labeled according to where they are BOTTLED, not where the olives were grown.
what i look for when i'm considering an oil:
1) does it have the harvest date? not a guarantee, but an indicator. you want something within the last two years, preferably the last year (this is for finishing oils, not for cooking).
2) what does the bottle look like? if it's clear glass, you're probably better off passing ... light has a bad effect on olive oil, too.
3) what's storage like? if it's at a supermarket without much oil turnover, they could sit there under fluorescent lights forever. much better to buy expensive oils from a specialist.
again ... those are considerations for finishing oils ... the kinds you'd use for salads or for seasoning soups and vegetables, etc, at the very end. For cooking, i don't find it makes much difference at all. i like the Santini brand i buy at trader joe's. it's good enough for salads and it's cheap enough to cook with. i'll usually have 2-3 other oils around the house for finishing ... affiorato from mancianti, tenuta numero uno, apollo californian oil ... depends on what i'm finding at the store.
post #49 of 88
I've been using the KL olive oil. Very nice. Expensive, though.
post #50 of 88
I got some Paesano unfiltered evoo from whole foods and i like it a lot. Made once a year in early october or so says the bottle. Like $20 but i enjoy it better than some other nice olive oils i've had. I've seen a fair amount of unfiltered olive oils but this one has been great so far
post #51 of 88
The wife and I use relatively inexpensive supermarket-level oil for cooking, although we did pick up a few "infused" oils for finishing from a semi-local placed called The Olive Orchard. Normally I shy away from anything flavored or otherwise gimmicky but I was really happy with what we tasted and a little swept up in the mood of a great day, so I decided to go for a few different ones. Definitely not a decision I regret. I grew up with everything cooked in generic vegetable oil or Crisco, so I appreciate the flavor of almost any olive oil when it comes to sauteed foods.
post #52 of 88
I use Frantoia
post #53 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
I use a Tuscan oil that I get ripped off on at Williams Sonoma. Of all the oils I've tasted, I prefer the Tuscan varities, anyone know any good ones that are reasonable (less than $50) and relatively widely available.


Try Frantoia. Around $20 and very good in my opinion.
post #54 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
the olive oil business is very, very slippery (pun intended). basically, find an oil you like and stick with it; don't worry about whether it's labeled extra-virgin ... those labels can be almost entirely fraudulent. and don't even get started on point-of-origin labeling ... european oils are labeled according to where they are BOTTLED, not where the olives were grown.
what i look for when i'm considering an oil:
1) does it have the harvest date? not a guarantee, but an indicator. you want something within the last two years, preferably the last year (this is for finishing oils, not for cooking).
2) what does the bottle look like? if it's clear glass, you're probably better off passing ... light has a bad effect on olive oil, too.
3) what's storage like? if it's at a supermarket without much oil turnover, they could sit there under fluorescent lights forever. much better to buy expensive oils from a specialist.
again ... those are considerations for finishing oils ... the kinds you'd use for salads or for seasoning soups and vegetables, etc, at the very end. For cooking, i don't find it makes much difference at all. i like the Santini brand i buy at trader joe's. it's good enough for salads and it's cheap enough to cook with. i'll usually have 2-3 other oils around the house for finishing ... affiorato from mancianti, tenuta numero uno, apollo californian oil ... depends on what i'm finding at the store.


does olive oil have labeling requirements like wine? are there terms that are controlled? is there an equivalent of estate bottled?
post #55 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by indesertum View Post
does olive oil have labeling requirements like wine? are there terms that are controlled? is there an equivalent of estate bottled?

perhaps slightly in theory. in practice, nope. the international olive oil council is the regulating body. this makes foxes watching henhouses seem infinitely preferable.
post #56 of 88
The answer here, as in most things, is go Californian.
post #57 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post
The answer here, as in most things, is go Californian.

i'm not so sure. i've had a few good oils from California, but the percentages aren't high. Though the prices certainly are. It just bugs me to take a chance on a second-year producer out of Cali that is charging the same amount for oil as Laudemio. it's like those cult cabs and bordeaux. i understand that they have high start-up costs that have to be paid for, but i didn't ask them to go into that business.
post #58 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
i'm not so sure. i've had a few good oils from California, but the percentages aren't high. Though the prices certainly are. It just bugs me to take a chance on a second-year producer out of Cali that is charging the same amount for oil as Laudemio. it's like those cult cabs and bordeaux. i understand that they have high start-up costs that have to be paid for, but i didn't ask them to go into that business.
I think it's quite possible to get very good olive oil at most supermarkets without paying a hell of a lot. One brand that always gets mentioned though, (and I don't get it,) is Colavita. I really don't like that oil.
post #59 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
I think it's quite possible to get very good olive oil at most supermarkets without paying a hell of a lot.
i agree. it's quite possible to get a good oil at the supermarket; though it's very difficult to get a great oil. it's kind of like wine. the main thing is to trust your taste, because the labeling is unreliable in the extreme. If you like it, don't worry whether it is truly extra-virgin.
post #60 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas View Post
Try Frantoia. Around $20 and very good in my opinion.

Is that a brand as well? Frantoia is the variety of olive that is most used to make oils.

I buy the olive oil from Costco (Kirkland Select with a harvest date of 2009) for cooking, even for high heat because I've gotten into the habit of oiling the meats or vegetables with the oil before throwing them into a hot pan.

For years, I've repeatedly gone back to Zoe olive oil, from Spain, for my dressings, bread dipping, and finishing. I don't like the bite of many oils, like Tuscan, on its own, and Zoe has a much better balance for my taste.
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