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Olive Oil - Page 2

post #16 of 88
I've been using a Greek oil that I buy from a guy at a local farmer's market (Eliki is the brand). I get that one because I tasted it at the stand and I really liked it. I've had other very good oils from Italy, France and California - I don't think the country of origin means all that much. You really need to find a good gourmet food store or other vendor where you can taste a few of the oils get the one that you like the best. There is variety of flavor among good oils, so tasting is the best way to find what you like.
post #17 of 88
I use Ravagni if I'm not using heat or mixing with something that would make it pointless to use a $30 oil. Sometimes I'll try something else but I buy this more often than not. If I'm using heat, I use cheaper stuff, so I always have at least 2 bottles on-hand.
post #18 of 88
dp
post #19 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron View Post
I've been using a Greek oil that I buy from a guy at a local farmer's market (Eliki is the brand). I get that one because I tasted it at the stand and I really liked it. I've had other very good oils from Italy, France and California - I don't think the country of origin means all that much. You really need to find a good gourmet food store or other vendor where you can taste a few of the oils get the one that you like the best. There is variety of flavor among good oils, so tasting is the best way to find what you like.

It doesn't matter but there are some distinct greek oils that are very assertive. For quite a long time Greeks have been selling their oil to italian brands that just market it under their own marquee so it's a bit of a misnomer, but there are differences in the typical oils.
post #20 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
What's your reasoning? Greek olive oil is fine, but you realize that there are many, many varieties, and Greek food isn't exactly the height of cuisine. It's about as unsophisticated as you can get, and I do think that italians have stuff that is as least as good, and is probably the reason why most chefs use good italian olive oils. EDIT: I just realized that I've tried this Chorio. There's an excellent reason why 5 litres of the shit costs $20. I remember working in a kitchen at Cap Grille with this hairy sweaty Greek bastard who always went on about Greek olive oil. We did blind tastings and it wasn't the blow out he said it would be. For anyone with tastebuds and any kind of exposure to food apart from McDonalds and olive garden, treat yourself to something a little better.
You saved me the trouble of saying this. I agree completely. And another thing: it's practical in a sense to save your good olive oils for finishing and use your supermarket extra-virgins in the pan. On the other hand, you should realize that nice oils degrade rather quickly over time, and that most people -- especially if they've got several bottles in their cabinet -- are not going to be able to use up their supply of the good stuff in time if they reserve it only for finishing and dipping. Applying heat does cause many of the more subtle characteristics of a fine EVOO to break down, but it will still be evident in your plated dish that you used a high-quality oil to prepare it. So in other words, don't be so stingy with the good stuff.
post #21 of 88
it really is a matter of taste. while I like italian and spanish oils, I really like greek and palestinian/lebanese oils. can be very personal.
post #22 of 88
You really should not be using EV or any high quality OO for sauteing. The smoke point is too low, and the flavor is too assertive. Save the good oil for drizzles, and use canola, safflower, peanut or some blend for cooking.
post #23 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
You really should not be using EV or any high quality OO for sauteing. The smoke point is too low, and the flavor is too assertive. Save the good oil for drizzles, and use canola, safflower, peanut or some blend for cooking.

I use Canola for anything high heat.
post #24 of 88
Canola oil is the best thing to come from Canada since lumber.
post #25 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
You really should not be using EV or any high quality OO for sauteing. The smoke point is too low, and the flavor is too assertive. Save the good oil for drizzles, and use canola, safflower, peanut or some blend for cooking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
I use Canola for anything high heat.

+1. You need more than one olive oil, and more than one type of oil.

Lately, for bread dipping, drizzling over things, etc., I've been using: http://www.igourmet.com/shoppe/prodview.aspx?prod=009 It has a very fruity flavor.
post #26 of 88
I don't like the flavor of canola oil. Safflower is more neutral.
post #27 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird's One View View Post
I don't like the flavor of canola oil. Safflower is more neutral.

What flavor?
post #28 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
+1. You need more than one olive oil, and more than one type of oil.

Lately, for bread dipping, drizzling over things, etc., I've been using: http://www.igourmet.com/shoppe/prodview.aspx?prod=009 It has a very fruity flavor.

Funny enough that's one of my good olive oils, and it's affordable. I actually used it last night. It's available at Whole Foods for about $14. Pretty good.
post #29 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
You really should not be using EV or any high quality OO for sauteing. The smoke point is too low, and the flavor is too assertive. Save the good oil for drizzles, and use canola, safflower, peanut or some blend for cooking.

Many people say that, but Batali uses ex-virgin for everything, including deep frying.
post #30 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRov View Post
Many people say that, but Batali uses ex-virgin for everything, including deep frying.

I used too as well but I find it works better not to.

It all depends on the temp. Below 300 you are fine. I think 310 is where it starts to become a problem. A great many Batali recipes call for a slow saute, and EVOO works fine for that, if you want that flavor. He always does.

For other French dishes, and for fish, I typically don't.

Deep frying with it seems wierd, but then I deep fry at home maybe twice a year.
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