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Buyers and sellers feedback thread - Page 20  

post #286 of 5452
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgan View Post
Not exactly on-point, but I wasn't sure where else to post this.

It seems the majority of sellers delete the final asking price/sale price of the goods, and replace the number with the word "SOLD." As both a buyer and seller, I find this incredibly frustrating. I often search similar items to determine whether the price asked or offered is reasonable, but this valuable data often disappears the instant it's confirmed. Would anyone else like to see this information preserved? How could we effect such a change in the forum's standard practices?

I think erasing the price benefits buyers and sellers. It benefits the sellers since say there is an RLPL shirt that no one wants to buy. Over time, the desperate seller slowly reduces the price from $125 down to $70 where it finally sells at no profit or a even small loss. The next time the seller lists a different RLPL shirt for sale he may have to start near the deeply discounted price. Since potential buyers can see that his last one sold for only $70 and the new one is at $125 they may not buy until they get the discounts they figure are coming.

The practice of erasing the price also can benefit the buyer since, say Seller A bought an RLPL shirt for $100 and sold it quickly for $125. Seller B bought a similar shirt for $50 and hopes to sell it for $75. Leaving the past sale price can definitely hurt the buyer since seller B will always see that seller A sold it for $125 and thus he will sell it for a higher price.

Does that make sense? I'm not sure.
post #287 of 5452
Well, it's having your cake and eating it too. Use market forces to create demand/market for your product, then deny one of the basic fundamentals of open markets, which is price discovery through previous and concurrent transactions.
post #288 of 5452
I would like them to keep measurements up though. I'm fine with them erasing the price.
post #289 of 5452
I have a pretty good idea in my head of what something is worth so I don't care if prices are deleted. I don't have to search to figure out that a used Ferragamo tie for $40 is not a good deal but that a new Incotex for $40 is.
post #290 of 5452
Quote:
Originally Posted by sloane3 View Post
I have a pretty good idea in my head of what something is worth so I don't care if prices are deleted. I don't have to search to figure out that a used Ferragamo tie for $40 is not a good deal but that a new Incotex for $40 is.
You should launch a service that competes with eBay. What's the point of paying fees to create an auction when buyers and sellers can simply ask sloane3 for the right price and be done with it?
post #291 of 5452
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Well, it's having your cake and eating it too. Use market forces to create demand/market for your product, then deny one of the basic fundamentals of open markets, which is price discovery through previous and concurrent transactions.
well said!
post #292 of 5452
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
You should launch a service that competes with eBay. What's the point of paying fees to create an auction when buyers and sellers can simply ask sloane3 for the right price and be done with it?
Not a bad idea. Sellers PM sloane3 with pic and description of the item and he sets a fair price for a small service fee. The seller can then proudly display this logo:
post #293 of 5452
post #294 of 5452
post #295 of 5452
I'm flattered
post #296 of 5452
Quote:
Originally Posted by Limniscate View Post
Yes, he said he would not refund me. The pants were pretty cheap, but I wouldn't have bought them had I known about the actual condition.

Very crappy. I once received a coat that reeked of cig. smoke. When I mentioned it to the seller he refunded 25% which was nice, I guess, but I wouldn't had bought had I known. He claimed that he hadn't noticed it - possible I suppose.
post #297 of 5452
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnGeLiCbOrIs View Post
I think erasing the price benefits buyers and sellers. It benefits the sellers since say there is an RLPL shirt that no one wants to buy. Over time, the desperate seller slowly reduces the price from $125 down to $70 where it finally sells at no profit or a even small loss. The next time the seller lists a different RLPL shirt for sale he may have to start near the deeply discounted price. Since potential buyers can see that his last one sold for only $70 and the new one is at $125 they may not buy until they get the discounts they figure are coming.

The practice of erasing the price also can benefit the buyer since, say Seller A bought an RLPL shirt for $100 and sold it quickly for $125. Seller B bought a similar shirt for $50 and hopes to sell it for $75. Leaving the past sale price can definitely hurt the buyer since seller B will always see that seller A sold it for $125 and thus he will sell it for a higher price.

Does that make sense? I'm not sure.

I understand your rationale, but it ignores the transaction costs, in time and frustration, of making a deal when there is no market transparency. I'd much rather sell something quickly at a fair price than have to let it sit, or repeatedly discount it. I'm also far more likely to buy something when I have some basis for evaluating its price. I've passed up many deals as a buyer because I simply had no way of knowing what a fair price was for a given article of clothing. The problem is worse with used items, for which I can't compare retail prices.

Both of your examples betray your bias as a regular seller. I don't begrudge you this; you find a lot of great stuff and make it available here, which adds value to the product. In each example, you assume that the product is purchased at a discount for the specific purpose of reselling it for a profit. However, much of the clothing available for sale was purchased at full retail, then used or worn, and is sold for less than it was purchased for.

The purchase price isn't a secret, but it's also not the most important factor. What's relevant is how well an item holds its value after wearings, alterations, etc. The information I need is not what the seller paid for it (which you assume is the key data point), because that's generally available info. What I most need to know is: how much of a discount I should expect for shoes that are almost new, versus lightly worn, versus heavily used? How much value is lost when I hem this raw denim or PRBL suit pants?

The secondary market for the clothing on the B&S forums is already a niche market with few data points. Losing all this information is unfortunate.
post #298 of 5452
By the way, mulansauce is a good customer. Quick payment.
post #299 of 5452
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgan View Post
I understand your rationale, but it ignores the transaction costs, in time and frustration, of making a deal when there is no market transparency. I'd much rather sell something quickly at a fair price than have to let it sit, or repeatedly discount it. I'm also far more likely to buy something when I have some basis for evaluating its price. I've passed up many deals as a buyer because I simply had no way of knowing what a fair price was for a given article of clothing. The problem is worse with used items, for which I can't compare retail prices.

Both of your examples betray your bias as a regular seller. I don't begrudge you this; you find a lot of great stuff and make it available here, which adds value to the product. In each example, you assume that the product is purchased at a discount for the specific purpose of reselling it for a profit. However, much of the clothing available for sale was purchased at full retail, then used or worn, and is sold for less than it was purchased for.

The purchase price isn't a secret, but it's also not the most important factor. What's relevant is how well an item holds its value after wearings, alterations, etc. The information I need is not what the seller paid for it (which you assume is the key data point), because that's generally available info. What I most need to know is: how much of a discount I should expect for shoes that are almost new, versus lightly worn, versus heavily used? How much value is lost when I hem this raw denim or PRBL suit pants?

The secondary market for the clothing on the B&S forums is already a niche market with few data points. Losing all this information is unfortunate.

It's not rocket science honestly.
1. Look at the item.
2. Decide for yourself if it's worth the asking price.

Do you really need someone to tell you how much you should be willing to pay for some used shoes?
post #300 of 5452
Quote:
Originally Posted by HomerJ View Post
Not a bad idea. Sellers PM sloane3 with pic and description of the item and he sets a fair price for a small service fee. The seller can then proudly display this logo:



Quote:
Originally Posted by sloane3 View Post
It's not rocket science honestly.
1. Look at the item.
2. Decide for yourself if it's worth the asking price.

Do you really need someone to tell you how much you should be willing to pay for some used shoes?

da da!

Come on, sloane - how much?
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