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I am going to WW Chan in HK tomorrow

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Meeting Patrick tomorrow after lunch. I plan to wear my latest bespoke suit that I got from Singapore to the appointment. FYI, I just moved from Singapore to HK, so I need more suits for the wardrobe (what a great excuse ). I am going to point out what I like and do not like about the suit I have on. Would that serve as a good point of departure for a Patrick? I would also like to seek his opinion on the placement of jacket buttonpoint (and therefore waist) on a 2-button jacket. I now have my jacket buttonpoint placed the same height as the narrowest part of my torso (front view). It results in a buttonpoint that is about 3 inches above my navel. Do you think that is too high? I have a couple of suits made from Loro Piana fabric already, and would like to try some English fabric for a change. Can anyone recommend some English fabric that is in the same price range as LP 120/130s? Thanks in advance. Other advice/suggestions are welcome.
post #2 of 24
Check out the Charles Clayton -- not sure if they'll offer you the special price that they are offering in the states. My tailor has J. & J. Minnis cloth, which surprisingly was LESS than his Loro Piana 120s. Grayson speaks highly of Minnis. Holland & Sherry is another option. To be frank, I think that Loro Piana is probably the most overpriced fabric in the world, and if you have to pay $150 more for a Holland & Sherry, Lessor, or Minnis cloth, it's worth it. IMO, 2" above the navel for someone who is 5'10" or so is the perfect button placement. But, again, it depends upon what looks best on you. I just happen to think that too high of a button point leads to too much flaring in the skirt.
post #3 of 24
I would just say, "Trust Patrick." In my two meetings, I have been impressed by his judgment and good sense. In our latest meeting this past Sunday, he absolutely refused to go along with one questionable idea of mine, which raised my opinion of his sartorial integrity.
post #4 of 24
There is a tailor called Mr Luk who may be worth a visit. He operates a small stand where he has been working for the past 50 years in Central. At the top of a stairwell, I think on Wellington Street. I have always wanted to try him out, but never had the occassion. His little stand covered in various news stories on him dating back to god-knows-when. Classically Shanghainese trained, and then worked under a British master after that for some extra polish. He charges 1600HKD to make a suit with your own cloth, use his cloth, add at cost. His suits are fully canvassed, with horn buttons and he immediately issues the warning "but i only make my style no Hugo Boss style" to you...which as I read a post declaring recently (from Manton I think) - is far better than a tailor who claims to be able to make anything. However he speaks no English...so...hows your Canto?
post #5 of 24
What were those "questionable ideas" you had?
post #6 of 24
kolecho, Can you recommend a good tailor for bespoke in Singapore? My wife (Singaporian) and I will be going back down next Christmas.
post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
I had a couple of bespoke suits made by Joe's Tailoring in the Fuji Xerox Building (formerly IBM Building) recently before I came out here. I am no expert in the Singapore tailoring scene. Ask one of our forum members "My View". He is a great guy who is very willing to share his experiences and passion for good clothing. He was the one who recommended me to Joe.
post #8 of 24
As with JLibourel, Patrick has talked me out of some questionable ideas and I trust his intent and most of his judgement. I don't think his judgement is infallible, though. He has been pushing the high stance two-button jackets recently because they're fashionable. A lower button stance suits me better as a number of informed people have confirmed. I had to convince Patrick of that for my latest order. dan
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Check out the Charles Clayton -- not sure if they'll offer you the special price that they are offering in the states.
I agree. When I saw Patrick last week, I was impressed by the Charles Clayton fabric, sufficiently so to commission a suit made from it. While I'm a neophyte in the world of fabrics, it appeared to have more "spring" than the Loro Piana used for my first Chan suit, and the patterns were very nice indeed.
post #10 of 24
Everything Minnis offers is consistently of the highest quality. They're one of the sterling names in cloth. While Minnis are known for their heavier-weight cloth (beefy flannels and other woolens), their lighter-weight worsted "Rangoon" range should be on anyone's short list. I have a summer-weight blue blazer with Rangoon cloth and it is a great 12-month cloth. An aristocratic gentleman I know refers to Rangoon as among the "noblest" of cloth. Grayson
post #11 of 24
Quote:
I now have my jacket buttonpoint placed the same height as the narrowest part of my torso (front view).  It results in a buttonpoint that is about 3 inches above my navel.  Do you think that is too high?
The position of the navel (belly button) is not so important.  What's important is your body's actual waist.  On some people, the belly button is right on the natural waist; on other people, it's not.  At best, the belly button is an indicator of the natural waist; but not a dispositive one. A button point on the waist is fine.  Unless you are an unsually high-waisted dude, in which case you might want to drop it down a bit.
post #12 of 24
Quote:
He has been pushing the high stance two-button jackets recently because they're fashionable
It is a "newer" style but fashionable? Saw this trend coming like 4 years ago. Many mass produced RTW suit already adopt this stance and button arrangement. For Loro Piana 120, there are at least two grades......One is the four season fabric, another is called Tasmania. The latter commanding a higher price and is of better quality.
post #13 of 24
I don't particularly like the Tasmania for everyday wear -- it's too delicate and I've found that it's prone to pulls and runs. I have a suit in the Four Season and I agree that it is a rather ordinary fabric -- definitely not my favorite, but more appropriate for workhorse wear. LP looks great under camera lights -- what with its shimmering silkiness and all. But it just doesn't translate well to the real world for me.
post #14 of 24
Which was the fabric we all got on the November visit? The 4-season?
post #15 of 24
Yes, they had the LP Four Seasons Super 120s on special in November. This time around I opted for a fabric other than the Clayton because I was worried about its durability. Based on the recent posts about wools, that may have been unnecessary. dan
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