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The Yacht Thread - Page 3

post #31 of 105
J class yachts are so beautiful, I don't know why but they have so much more impact on me than those plastic looking mega yachts.
For motorboats I do dig wally though, a stealthy badguy boat that is the complete opposite of the j class yachts.
post #32 of 105
Is Ft Lauderdale still the yacht capital of the U.S.? I've heard that the upkeep on the bigger boats is roughly 10% of the sale price. Meaning Paul Allen would spend about 20 million a year just docking, cleaning and paying his crew (I read he has a full-time crew of 65 ppl).
post #33 of 105
I have a weak spot for huge yachts with sails and the the expedition class yachts that can really take you around the world...
post #34 of 105
Wally,the design is awesome.although i dont know what kind of resale it would have.
post #35 of 105
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by robin View Post
Can you share what the buying process is like? And what if someone wanted a new custom boat built for them - would they go through a broker like you or would they go straight to a ship maker?
I dont have much experience with large megayacht commissioned builds, but the prospected buyer would most likely go through a broker that specializes in large commissions (there are a few companies that deal exclusively with megayachts) A typical large yacht buyer (probably 70ft up to 150-170ft) would get a 'semi-custom' yacht, meaning the hull (or framework) of the boat is standard for that particular model, and the buyer has full customizable control over the stateroom layout (to an extent), interior and flooring color/material, kitchen layout and appliance options, wood finish colors, engine and generator options, etc. etc. This is the most common form of a new build, mainly because the build time is much quicker than a full out custom build. The buyer would go through a broker, which helps them with deciding the yacht options based on the type of use the boat will get, deal with contracts/documentation, deadlines, international buying and shipping issues (very common in this industry), and negotiating prices, and sometimes helping the owner hire a crew. I almost wish i got a law degree, now that I know how much we deal with international contracts and constituencies. I am fairly new in the industry, so I havent personally done much with custom builds (although my company does a lot of them). I deal a lot with helping current yacht owners find buyers for their yachts, and helping potential buyers find a particular yacht that theyre interested in.
post #36 of 105
Couldn't resist...

post #37 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodyStylee View Post
Yes, the market kinda sucks right now. But it's similar to real estate in the sense that the people who CAN buy, are doing so now. I sold a boat 2 days before christmas.....the buyers are out there, but yes, sales are down.

and that Koons boat is fucking horrendous. Looks like a marine engineer and a brooklyn hipster took some acid and designed a boat together

Our customers are basically the same people and I had deliveries 22, 23, AND 24th of Dec.

For the guys asking about custom build time...my last big sale was for a boat that was apparently commissioned 3 years ago. Something like 10mil Euro. Paid me a little over 50 for the tender. And the deal was done mainly through blackberry.
post #38 of 105
I couldn't resist posting a pic of the Wasp.

post #39 of 105
Do any of you yacht fellows have a source for a photo of The Constellation? It's a former TransPac class A winner 76-foot schooner on which I did a post-refurb shakedown run from San Diego to Avalon on Catalina Island in 1973 prior to a round-the-world voyage.

The boat was owned by Roberta Erb here in La Jolla. With a previous owner, the boat won Class A in the 1959 TransPac. It was a fine old "brass and teak" schooner with a sad and checkered history. Roberta's ownership continued that same historical pattern of craziness and sadness.

That shakedown run to Cataliina Island was a nightmare. It was like something from a Stephen King story. Roberta locked herself in the cabin with a case of Scotch. Her son (the so-called captain) and his girlfriend were gobbling pills like there was no tomorrow. The rest of the crew consisted of four of us and I am not much of sailor. I was just glad to get off of the boat in Avalon. I jumped ship as soon as we reached Avalon and took a helicopter to San Pedro where I rented a car to get back to La Jolla rather than make the return voyage.

When they returned to San Diego, all of the final details for the global voyage were completed and away they went with lots more Scotch for Roberta. I was told that most of the crew (including Roberta's son, the captain) jumped ship in the Marquesas while some minor repairs were being made. Roberta filed irregular reports with our local La Jolla Light newspaper for publication. The voyage took more than thirty months because of continual changes of crew and other dramas.

Before Roberta purchased the boat, it was owned by another lady sailor from Beverly Hills! I never did learn her name. She was the one that won Class A in the 1959 TransPac. I later found out that this previous lady owner-sailor had committed suicide with an overdose of sleeping pills while aboard the boat when it was anchored in Newport Beach. Supposedly the boat languished from that time until Roberta bought it.

Anyway, I can't seem to locate any of the photos I made. There must be some Internet resource with photos of well-known boats. Perhaps someone can steer me to a source for a photo of The Constellation?

___
post #40 of 105
That's quite a story, FC. It's quite sad for a classic boat like that to end up in the hands of someone likely to destroy it. It's also sad when someone rich enough to afford these things is too dissipated to treat them responsibly.

Do you have any details about the previous history of the boat?
post #41 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red View Post
That's quite a story, FC. It's quite sad for a classic boat like that to end up in the hands of someone likely to destroy it. It's also sad when someone rich enough to afford these things is too dissipated to treat them responsibly.

Do you have any details about the previous history of the boat?

There is very little more for me to add. I was told that the owner prior to Roberta purchased The Constellation specifically for the TransPac because the boat had a proven racing history. However, with me being primarily an occasional day sailor before and after that episode I really come up short of knowledge. My primitive Internet search skills don't seem to disclose much worth mentioning.

Oh, I did find the previous owner's name in an archived blurb from the Los Angeles Times . That mostly confirms the suicide story I mentioned in my original post. From that Times article:"The latter category includes a story of wealthy Beverly Hills socialite Sally Blair Ames, who bought Constellation in 1959, pronounced to the press: "People think I'm a bitch with a big boat, but the hell with them," and proceeded to finish first in her division. Soon thereafter, at 33, Ames died of an overdose of sleeping pills."

Roberta's son supposedly went to jail for some drug-related crime in the Marquesas. His girlfriend went back to California while he was jailed in the Marquesas. Shortly after she arrived back here, she drowned in a hotel bathtub during a seizure. Roberta's reports in the La Jolla Light mentioned none of problems. It was as if the voyage was without incident.

I saw the boat at anchor in Harbor Island Marina here in San Diego after Roberta finally returned. I just wasn't interested in getting close. I'm sure the boat must be in better hands these days. At least I hope so. The Catalina run was my only sail that was even close to open ocean sailing. Everything else before or since has been within seven or eight miles of some coast or another.

___
post #42 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by yachtie View Post
Ours: 1963 S&S yawl




As they used to say, yar.


- B
post #43 of 105
Hey Canvas. I was on the first leg of the journey. Probably have some pics, depends what you need. Josh (son) didn't get put in jail down there. Yes, Abby did die from a seizure in a bath tub. The actual shakedown was to Santa Barbara. The Avalon trip was just for fun. Anyhoo, let me know what you need. Take care.
post #44 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodyStylee View Post
Yes, the market kinda sucks right now. But it's similar to real estate in the sense that the people who CAN buy, are doing so now. I sold a boat 2 days before christmas.....the buyers are out there, but yes, sales are down.

and that Koons boat is fucking horrendous. Looks like a marine engineer and a brooklyn hipster took some acid and designed a boat together

a bit late to this thread but +1. This has really been the time quite a few of my friends families have been buying into new boats. Lots of deals to be had.
post #45 of 105
I enjoy taking the J/22 out on weekends.
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