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What Manton Learned at Culinary School Today - Page 28

post #406 of 618
Nice job! That really sounds like a full day's work. I can't believe you got your kid(s) to wait until 3 o'clock to open gifts!
post #407 of 618
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
If he had been there, 1) I think my mistakes would have been avoided; 2) the plating would have been nicer; 3) f-ups would have been detected and adjusted and corrected earlier; 4) everything would have gone faster and more smoothly; 5) the meat would have been neater and cooked better; 6) bascially, everything would have tasted better.

PSHAW. Fair, I guess...true in some areas, but likely a matter of degrees in others. You yourself have quite a bit of training and practice and a mildly rabid perfectionist streak. Probably would have taken a lot less time having four hands instead of two, though. You likely would have learned a good bit, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I think that is not the bevel, just where the phony Damascus effect gives way to polish. The actual bevel is quite small and normal.

Sometimes I wish you wouldn't burst my bubble like that.
post #408 of 618
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post
PSHAW. Fair, I guess...true in some areas, but likely a matter of degrees in others. You yourself have quite a bit of training and practice and a mildly rabid perfectionist streak. Probably would have taken a lot less time having four hands instead of two, though. You likely would have learned a good bit, though.
I also would have had more fun.
post #409 of 618
This is like a second Christmas! First, the shoe circle finally got explained. Then Manton gives us another installment of his cooking adventure --- thank you! And Jeffrey is finding his inner Drapist.

--Andre
post #410 of 618
very nice. cracked up at the tourne and the peeled mushrooms ... first chef i ever worked for insisted on fluting all mushrooms. unbelievable pita that did absolutely nothing for the dish. but it's the upholding of standards.
how did you feel about the plating of the main course? would you do that regularly? that's not a critical comment at all, i'm just curious because i used to do those kinds of arrangements, too, but now prefer a little more relaxed, natural style. i guess i'm more italian than french.
post #411 of 618
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I also would have had more fun.

I believe that: partly because of the nature of shared burdens in general, but also because [name withheld] seems to be especially good company.
post #412 of 618
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
how did you feel about the plating of the main course? would you do that regularly? that's not a critical comment at all, i'm just curious because i used to do those kinds of arrangements, too, but now prefer a little more relaxed, natural style. i guess i'm more italian than french.

I was going for FCI Formal and didn't quite make it.
post #413 of 618
Very nice Manton. I'm surprised you hadn't done much with parsnip before. It's my favorite root vegetable and I eat it all the time.
post #414 of 618
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I was going for FCI Formal and didn't quite make it.

please! i think it looks great. don't misunderstand me, i was referring to the style of plating, not the quality or the effort. and it was an honest question: i'm really curious as to having gone through that, did the formal plating pay off for you? you're obviously a good cook and someone who cares about it ... and that's who i hope my readership is, so it's good for me to know. of course, here in california we do everything a little less formally. we'd probably eat that out back on the picnic table. with shorts and baseballcaps.
post #415 of 618
Wow.
post #416 of 618
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
please! i think it looks great. don't misunderstand me, i was referring to the style of plating, not the quality or the effort. and it was an honest question: i'm really curious as to having gone through that, did the formal plating pay off for you? you're obviously a good cook and someone who cares about it ... and that's who i hope my readership is, so it's good for me to know. of course, here in california we do everything a little less formally. we'd probably eat that out back on the picnic table. with shorts and baseballcaps.

I never gave a single thought about plating until I took this class. Now I try to do it right because I feel like I should, and I admit that it makes the food look better.

That meal was cooked at my parents' house in Santa Cruz, CA, with a "backyard" that sits atop a bluff looking over the Monterey Bay.

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread...enjoy+the+snow

No way we were going to sit out there, though. Too cold.
post #417 of 618
Manton, your post was truly interesting to read. Thanks.
post #418 of 618
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
That meal was cooked at my parents' house in Santa Cruz, CA, with a "backyard" that sits atop a bluff looking over the Monterey Bay.

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread...enjoy+the+snow

No way we were going to sit out there, thought. Too cold.

i have to say, i never in a million years would have figured you for a santa cruz boy.
post #419 of 618
great job

congrats and chapeau.
post #420 of 618
Colour me impressed. Looks very good.
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