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Alfa Romeo - Grand Prix and Sports Cars

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
From my image archives:

Some Early Grand Prix Cars

Mid-1920s Team Photo - On the Boards at Brooklands

1937 Monaco GP, 8C-35, Carlos Maria Pincatuda, 9th Place

1950 British GP Silverstone, Pre-Race, Tipo 158, #1 Fangio, #2 Fagioli, #3 Farina (number not visible), #4 Parnell (barely visible behind Fangio's car)

1951 Juan Manuel Fangio in Tipo 159, Publicity Photo at Alfa Romeo Factory

1951 French GP at Reims, Juan Manuel Fangio, Tipo 159, 1st Place


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The Tipo 33 Sports Racer


1967 - The first T-33 under construction in the Autodelta (factory racing division) shop

1969 - Sicilian Nino Vaccarella (pictured), Andrea de Adamich at the Targa Florio

1971 - Andrea de Adamich (pictured), Henri Pescarolo, BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch

1971 - Toine Hezemans (pictured), Rolf Stommelen, BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch

1972 - Nurburgring, Rolf Stommelen Airborne at Flugplatz


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post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas View Post
From my image archives:


1972 - Nurburgring, Rolf Stommelen Airborne at Flugplatz


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I still can't believe people raced on the 'Ring without the armco. I had several "oh shit!" moments when driving it in the rain, but I would have much rather hit armco than a tree.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkk View Post
I still can't believe people raced on the 'Ring without the armco. I had several "oh shit!" moments when driving it in the rain, but I would have much rather hit armco than a tree.

Before your forum registration date, I did a little thread on Flying Cars at the Nurburgring. Perhaps it would interest you.

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=37198

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post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas View Post
Before your forum registration date, I did a little thread on Flying Cars at the Nurburgring. Perhaps it would interest you.

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=37198

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Thanks!
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkk View Post
Thanks!

FYI - I just added more to that thread in answer to Nantucket Red's question.

http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=37198


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post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkk View Post
I still can't believe people raced on the 'Ring without the armco. I had several "oh shit!" moments when driving it in the rain, but I would have much rather hit armco than a tree.
Wow! You've actually driven there? Tell us about it!
post #7 of 16
Full Canvas; these are great! Please keep them coming. Please?
post #8 of 16
nice!!
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orsini View Post
Wow! You've actually driven there? Tell us about it!

In short: heaven. I'm sure everyone has heard it before, but if you're a gearhead, you must make the pilgrimage to The Nurburgring at least once in your life.

Other than that, what do you want to know? I have an overload of bookmarked websites, files, pictures, and notes from my research and my time at the 'Ring.

Final quick thought: Even though my lap times were in the 10-12 minute range, it seems much shorter, and it takes a lot more out of you physically than you expect.
post #10 of 16
Nurburgring is open for anyone to drive right? I'm not too familiar with it but I work at a private track and people talk about it quite a bit. I take it from all those awesome mid-air pics that there are a lot of elevation changes eh?
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeni View Post
Nurburgring is open for anyone to drive right? I'm not too familiar with it but I work at a private track and people talk about it quite a bit. I take it from all those awesome mid-air pics that there are a lot of elevation changes eh?

Depending upon the configuration of the track and the time period in history, course length has ranged from approximately three miles to fourteen miles. Total elevation change on the long course exceeds nine hundred feet.

It is open to the public. I couldn't say what the current cost per lap happens to be. The last time I drove the course, I paid four Deutsche Marks per lap. There was no such thing as a currency called the Euro at that time!

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post #12 of 16
Wow fourteen miles? I bet it was pretty treacherous back in the day. Hope you have some more Alfa pics for us
post #13 of 16
It's still treachorous.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeni View Post
Nurburgring is open for anyone to drive right? I'm not too familiar with it but I work at a private track and people talk about it quite a bit. I take it from all those awesome mid-air pics that there are a lot of elevation changes eh?

Its considered a public toll road. For a low number of laps, it comes out to roughly $25/lap. I believe the prices are broken down on the Ring website. If not, there are lots of fan sites with that information.

As for elevation changes, not only is there a huge delta over the course, but there are also quick changes throughout. If you're going fast enough, you have to understand how to (and where to) hit the brakes quickly. If not, you're going to lose balance on the car and skid off the road.

And yes, it is still treacherous. Several crashes a day and estimated dozens of deaths a year. I spent months of driving simulators just to learn the curves, and I still wasn't properly prepared.
post #15 of 16
Look it up on youtube you will find plenty of old and new videos of the course. A great one is of JAckie Stewary in the 70s in an F1 car, with him narrating. Great stuff. Even today, I wouldn't ride that track in a motorcycle.
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