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Tuxedo Shoes - Page 3

post #31 of 46
I like to think of pumps as a bit of a F-U to contemporary convention.
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
I have a pair of calf-skin pumps.

+1

I get more compliments from women when I wear my calf pumps. They're an elegant shoe, and I have no issue at all wearing them.
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
I like to think of pumps as a bit of a F-U to contemporary convention.

Indeed, they are the anti-"out of shape, golfer, bussinessman, polo shirt and dockers, rental looking tuxedo with a wing collar and fake bow-tie" look shoe.
post #34 of 46
I like the idea of wearing velvet or grosgrain slippers to a black-tie wedding. I'm in the market and looking to buy in the next couple days. Can I get some opinions on this?
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai View Post
The rule about wearing patent leather with black tie is one of the rules I break. I agree that patent leather is the traditional choice. However, for some reason, I just can't bring myself to wear patent leather shoes. To my eye, they look cheap (even the nice ones.)
I completely agree. And Jan, I'd be very leery of counseling the joys of the pump. They are so out there that he will think you have gone completely round the bend and thus not pay attention to anything else you say. Plaintoe, black, very, very well polished. Or patent, but that's not for me. ~Huntsman
post #36 of 46
Thread Starter 
Goodness, how these old threads do get revived! For all the good advice contained in this thread, as it turns out, my boy is now in his fifth year in the fraternity and has never had occasion to wear black tie. The few lounge suits I have bought him suffice him just fine, and he claims he is by far the best dressed young man in the chapter. A sizable percentage of the lads go to "formal" events in shirt and tie (sans coat). James wears A-E bluchers with the suits, even though I have tried to get him into bals. Compared the footgear favored by most of his fraternity brothers, I doubt if he is committing a grievous faux pas!
post #37 of 46
Well, the update was good, thanks. There has been much necroposting of late.
post #38 of 46
another bump.

what are thoughts on black, plain, velvet slippers? these would be for my wedding

post #39 of 46
I know it is wrong, but I wear some very high polished AE park avenues with my DJ.
post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffsWood View Post
I know it is wrong, but I wear some very high polished AE park avenues with my DJ.

What's wrong about this? The non-patent leather balmorals or the AEs?

sorry.
post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by makewayhomer View Post
another bump.

what are thoughts on black, plain, velvet slippers? these would be for my wedding


To your own wedding? I wouldn't.
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai View Post
The rule about wearing patent leather with black tie is one of the rules I break.

I agree that patent leather is the traditional choice.

However, for some reason, I just can't bring myself to wear patent leather shoes. To my eye, they look cheap (even the nice ones.)

With my black tie clothing, I wear plain-toe Bal Oxfords in black shell cordovan, shined to a very high sheen.

I like this idea, actually. I know shell is often considered a rustic leather, but in black, couldn't it be shined to come close to patent, without it being so...patenty?
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Traditionally, evening pumps were calf or patent, lace-up shoes (always plain-toe oxfords; a blucher is seriously not right for a formal shoe) were patent. You can indeed wear the pump with white tie. Some authorities consider it to be required, or at least prefered, because it is a vestige of court dress, and therefore the most formal shoe in a man's arsenel.

In no contemporary (1930s) source that I have or have seen have I found a mention of plain leather lace-up formal shoes. I know some people hate patent; I'm not saying my word is dispositive (see below), just reporting what I have found.

How traditional is patent leather? Isn't it a fairly modern material?
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvrhye View Post
How traditional is patent leather? Isn't it a fairly modern material?

late 19th century. 1860s maybe? originally coated with linseed oil, now coated with plastic.
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird's One View View Post
late 19th century. 1860s maybe? originally coated with linseed oil, now coated with plastic.

I didn't know about the linseed before, but I kinda figured it showed up in the very early 20th century and was kinda a novelty then. That level of bling seems to outshine the lapels, which as far as I've always assumed would be the highlight of the outfit.
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