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Bespoke VS. Brioni

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Just curious, as this is NOT an issue I am facing but: If you could chose going bespoke at a top NYC custom shop VS Brioni at ~$4,000 a pop... why go Brioni? Sure they are beautiful, but at that price point, isn't bespoke ideal? I note Bergdorff's pushes their Brioni line (suits, shirts & ties) but makes no mention of their bespoke services in their catalouge. Is Brioni an "investment banker" thing? I know Jim Cramer sports the Brioni off the rack (he made mention of it recently).
post #2 of 28
If you really love Brioni, and would sort of pine for it and maybe regret that your tailor didn't quite get the look exactly right, you might be better off with Brioni. FYI, I don't know that they do bespoke out of the US; I think it's only MTM. The bespoke price in Rome is a lot lower, by the way, or used to be, before the dollar's nosedive.
post #3 of 28
See if my in-depth custom vs. MTM comparison is still available on AA, in which I compare one of my Oxxford MTM suits with one of my custom suits. That should give you all the insights you need. Do a search on "Raphael Oxxford". Grayson
post #4 of 28
I could only discuss the opportunity to chose between a designer suit and a bespoke suit. To me Brioni doesnt fall into the designer suit category, thus there are little pros to brioni vs bespoke. There is, however, one big pro, time & hassle. Most of the people who have the money to buy brioni retail don't have the time, nor the patience, to go bespoke. Thus, a well marketed "luxury" suit could be sold to this category of customers, regardless of the quality or fit. Luc
post #5 of 28
Quote:
(Luc-Emanuel) I could only discuss the opportunity to chose between a designer suit and a bespoke suit.
As a bespoke maker, I'll offer this caveat. If you go to a R-T-W maker such as Brioni and order a bespoke version of one of their existing models, you can be 100% certain of what you will receive. It will be the R-T-W design in your proper size ... and possibly with any modifications you have requested to the existing design. On the other side of the coin, if you utilize a bespoke maker and offer all of the thoughts you may have on that which you would like, the garment you receive is going to be the maker's interpretation of your thoughts. Even if you show photos, bring examples, or look at various sample ingredients the maker may have hanging around the shop, the final decisions as to how to assemble the creation will be his. The resultant creation may - probably will - be better than the final "R-T-W offering bespoke" maker ... but may not be exactly that which you sought. It is here you have to make your decision: Do you want a copy of something which exists? Or would you prefer a (probably) better finished product which may diverge from your concept? I thing I'm allowed to say this. In my time, I've improved upon (some might opine, "diverged from") quite a large number of clients' concepts.
post #6 of 28
The Brioni in Rome does real bespoke, under the supervision of a handful of tailors. It is a much superior garment to the MTM you would get through American retailers, which would be essentially what Alex described.
post #7 of 28
FWIW, I think the shoulders on a Brioni are exceptional. A bit built up, offering an extremely bold look. I would say it wouldn't look good on guys with very square shoulders but bespoke may solve that problem. I, however can't afford a Brioni and finding it in my size(36S) on sale is quite a difficult task.
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Just curious, as this is NOT an issue I am facing but: If you could chose going bespoke at a top NYC custom shop VS Brioni at ~$4,000 a pop... why go Brioni?  Sure they are beautiful, but at that price point, isn't bespoke ideal?   I note Bergdorff's pushes their Brioni line (suits, shirts & ties) but makes no mention of their bespoke services in their catalouge.   Is Brioni an "investment banker" thing?  I know Jim Cramer sports the Brioni off the rack (he made mention of it recently).  
If you know EXACTLY what you want, and trust your tailor implicitly, then of course bespoke would be the way to go.  As Manton states, if you're fond of the Brioni cut, then go with it, and save yourself the hassle, headaches and dollars of bespoke experimentation--(just ask Grayson). koji
post #9 of 28
If you really like the Brioni cut, try looking into Brioni's "custom" program, which I understand Brioni in Rome offers, although I have heard mixed things about it. If you do so, make sure they cut an individual pattern for you and don't simply modify a standard pattern, a shortcut other companies take. Brioni has long gone to more of a production manufacturing model for their RTW line over the years as the company has grown and as output has increased. I recently walked past their 57th Street, NY, store and could immediately detect a production-line look of the suits in the window. Brioni's "atelier" days are long gone. Grayson
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Is Brioni an "investment banker" thing?  I know Jim Cramer sports the Brioni off the rack (he made mention of it recently).  
I apologize for going off subject, but have you seen the collar on the shirts he's wearing on his new show? They are very spread and very long. Does this collar have a name? I definitely don't like them.
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Quote:
(oldskool @ Mar. 18 2005,06:49) Is Brioni an "investment banker" thing?  I know Jim Cramer sports the Brioni off the rack (he made mention of it recently).  
I apologize for going off subject, but have you seen the collar on the shirts he's wearing on his new show? They are very spread and very long. Does this collar have a name? I definitely don't like them.
Shark-fin collar, maybe?
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Shark-fin collar, maybe?
Are the front edges curved? That's a shark-fin collar. I don't like those, either.
post #13 of 28
i always thought that Jim Kramer looked like a bum when seated across from the stylish Larry Kudlow. there are no curves in his collar, almost looks like a T&A spread but with enlongated points, very baggy and sloppy. IMHO.
post #14 of 28
That's Cramer's thing isn't it? Kudlow is the stylish foil to Cramer's 'everyman'.
post #15 of 28
Mr. Everyman has a net worth of around $100 mil. Grayson
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