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Starting wardrobe - Page 3

post #31 of 62
true, but i see nothing wrong with looking better than some. what if the higher ups dress like slobs? where i work there are plenty of people over me who are wearing a jacket that's 15 years old they got at some cheesy department store for $99 and it shows. should i, or anyone, strive to be below that? that example is not an exaggeration. also, the guy is posting on the internet, so you have to assume he has the net and can at least check stuff out. sure the discount stores will have some good stuff, but what if he's nowhere near one? i am 6 hours from the closest NM last call, but i get stuff on ebay all the time
post #32 of 62
Two problems there for us British Jon, what you Americans call cuffed pants, we would call turn-ups, which are ridiculous in this day and age anyways, I mean who on earth would wear turn-ups, except some 90 year old, wearing brogues or tassel shoes (I know that in the US a lot of people DO wear tassel shoes, but in England people just find them ridiculous). And, I don't realy know what Slacks are anyway, I would assume they are a type of formal trouser. And no, they would not put buttons on if you said to have them cuffed.
post #33 of 62
Quote:
Two problems there for us British Jon, what you Americans call cuffed pants, we would call turn-ups, which are ridiculous in this day and age anyways, I mean who on earth would wear turn-ups, except some 90 year old, wearing brogues or tassel shoes (I know that in the US a lot of people DO wear tassel shoes, but in England people just find them ridiculous). And, I don't realy know what Slacks are anyway, I would assume they are a type of formal trouser. And no, they would not put buttons on if you said to have them cuffed.
But, of course I was kidding about the buttons on the slacks. Americans (and Canadians too for that matter) tend to muddle the name of trousers into a culmination of pants / slacks / trousers. Yes, I recall reading that the English do not favor turn-ups, they tend to like straight-hemmed trouser legs, regardless the application of the trouser (dress, casual, what have you...). I notice that most Americans tend to wear cuffed (turn-ups) trousers with one outfit or another. I personally think that pleated pants would have them (my wardrobe reflects as such), and I am hardly 90 years old. Straight hemmed seems very casual, very khakis / jeans to me. I guess opinions and customs / styles differ at either end of the pond. Jon.
post #34 of 62
I think the main thing, and this is no insult, but in the N. America, if you were to dress in what we British would call an old-man style, then it is considered formal, and decent. However, in the UK, and Europe for that matter, dressing fashionably, does not always mean that you do not look formal, or decent. But then again, in the US fashionable is A&F, and T-Shirts and Shorts, to the best of my knowledge, whereas fasionable in Europe is D&G, Dior Homme, Fendi, Gucci, Prada, with high quality italian jeans and l/s shirts. But then again my view of what's fasionable in Europe may be slightley jaded, as I live in London, and though my view my also apply to Milan and Paris, I doubt it applies to Birmingam, Manchester, or any other small European city or town.
post #35 of 62
I think that in order to make up for one extreme, with the t-shirt culture, they go to another extreme, with the tassel shoes, turn-ups, large lapels, tab collars, double breasted suits, leather strap watchs and colligate ties in N. America. (I do realise that may of these were initially British things, such as double breasted suits, large lapels, and the Oxbridge Union Tie, but they have certainly become out of fashion now)
post #36 of 62
Quote:
true, but i see nothing wrong with looking better than some.  what if the higher ups dress like slobs?  where i work there are plenty of people over me who are wearing a jacket that's 15 years old they got at some cheesy department store for $99 and it shows.  should i, or anyone, strive to be below that?  that example is not an exaggeration.
Well, I was only thinking in the context of a new grad's starting business wardrobe.  After you've established yourself there and the money's coming in, it's up to you what you spend it on, and hey, if looking good at work's your thing... I'm quite lucky in that RTW suits fit me fine (a very good thing cos I trash them so easily), but I probably wear nicer shoes than most people at work, even if they're just seconds from the Northampton factories.  Don't think I'd ever get a bespoke suit though, for example - given what the seniors are wearing, that would just be overkill on my part.
post #37 of 62
Well, lets set aside that I live in Palm Beach County, where most of the customers at the local Bentley dealership(s), go and purchase their automobiles whilst wearing a polo shirt, shorts and some type of loafer (many times sock less). With the heat reaching near a scorching 90 Fahrenheit degrees for weeks at a time in the summer, not to mention the enormous amount of humidity, wearing heavier D&G, Dior Homme, Fendi, Gucci, Prada, with high quality Italian jeans and especially long sleeve shirts can easily become a quick way to face massive dehydration, which when placed in the face of fashion, wins every time. As well, lets wet aside the larger-than-average per capita income in the PB County. When looking at the average American, then yes the staple of khakis and GAP t-shirts seem to dominate the landscape, but if you compare London (as we have established, a very expensive city) to say Manhattan (similarly expensive), then the style and fashion of dress becomes a lot more similar and you will see D&G, Dior Homme, Fendi, Gucci, and Prada on the street. There are some American items that made their way across Europe, such as the removable collar and the button-down shirt collar. Plus Brooks Brothers pioneered the concept of RTW suits; but Europe does not produce any RTW items, do they? I would think that it is better to appear less fashionable and to appear more classic (stylish), to appear that your clothes fit perfectly (well, almost perfectly; nothing is perfect after all is it?). If you walk in one of the aforementioned cities, you are more likely to see people wearing expensive designer wears than to see someone wearing a clothing item that properly fits. Jon.
post #38 of 62
All agreed except, Milan is also very hot, but I don't see them wearing rubbish, so not realy an excuse
post #39 of 62
Quote:
All agreed except, Milan is also very hot, but I don't see them wearing rubbish, so not realy an excuse
It's not only the heat that kills us; it's the humidity. What's wrong with DB anyways? I think a 6-4 configuration is very flattering on the right man. Also, strap watches is a not primarily American style; it is an obvious European one. Just look at the current Patek, Vacheron, etc... catalogues and take a look at the strap versus bracelet ratio, and every time there will be more strap watches. Jon.
post #40 of 62
DB, are allright, and yes they can look very good on some, but for most they fit very poorly, and lead to the bag effect. And they are coming back in, in Europe, but they were out for a long time. With the leather watch strap, as with many of the other items I mentioned, come from Europe, but they are not preffered, metal straps are, though as with DB suits, they are coming back in, albeit black not brown, as is the case in N. America.
post #41 of 62
Quote:
DB, are allright, and yes they can look very good on some, but for most they fit very poorly, and lead to the bag effect. And they are coming back in, in Europe, but they were out for a long time. With the leather watch strap, as with many of the other items I mentioned, come from Europe, but they are not preffered, metal straps are, though as with DB suits, they are coming back in, albeit black not brown, as is the case in N. America.
Luckily for some with large watch collections, they can choose to wear whatever type of watch they want whenever they feel like it. DB looks very good on slimmer people (especially the high peak-lapel 6-4 configuration and not the horrible "power suit" 6-2 low lapel configuration of the 1980's), it does unfortunately create a balloon effect on more porcine individuals. Jon. Side note: Nice Bentley, I have yet to see a GT in Boca. When did they come out in England?
post #42 of 62
I belive that the first Continental GT went to Switzerland last December, the first one in the UK was around Febuary, I got mine just last week, with a 10k pound premium.
post #43 of 62
Was it worth the premium? And, at least it's a lot less than the current market premium for the Enzo (ouch.). Jon. Enjoy the car in good health.
post #44 of 62
Definitely worth the premium, especially when you consider that you are getting the Bentley badge for that kind of money, (110k is more like a top end MB S500 than a Bentley.) Added to that, it is not as if they have cut corners. My only complaint is that the suspension is way way too hard for that kind of a car, feels reminiscent of a Volkswagen Golf (unfortunately I have driven one, a company car), but the interior, engine and everything else, I cannot fault it yet (I've only driven from Hampstead to the City and back in it). Actually the interior on a car for that price, is amazing, never seen anything come close for the money.
post #45 of 62
Well, Mercedes is not a good comparison when writing about Bentley. Especially since their quality has been going down the crapper. We used to have a 1997 S600 coupe (now the CL), and then we traded it for a 2000 CL500 and the difference in quality is horrendous. The interior was a lot cheaper and the car had constant computer problems. Then we got a S55 AMG in 2001, and I thought the CL was bad...this POS broke 3 times. First the supercharger would not turn on, and the car had to go to the shop for almost 2 weeks. Second time the car broke the engine overheated on the highway at around 70 mph and almost blew the gaskets; luckily the road was pretty barren with cars and was able to pull to the shoulder quickly and turn the car off. That's another 5 days in the shop. Third time the car broke the supercharger would not turn off and overheated the car again, which in turn cracked the engine block ("at least it's only a minor crack" said the head of the service department). Since the car was under warranty, it was fixed, but it took almost 3 ½ weeks to get a new engine (how else could they fix it?), in the mean time MB saw fit to give us a Ford Explorer as a service car (trust me, the anger towards that fantastic gesture was felt throughout the dealership that day ). So after the car was fixed, we exchanged it for a 2004 Jaguar XJ8 and there have been no problems since. The Jag is one nice car, no Bentley, but similar in British heritage, and design. Jon. (By "˜we' I mean my family, in other words; my father )
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