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yoko devereaux/oliver helden/ron-n-ron

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
LA guy posted the yoko devereaux name in another thread which is likely the first time i've seen it mentioned here, so i thought i'd do a post on some newer uprising men's labels on yoko devereaux, absolutely love the sharp tailoring, simple but with an edge, and the casual wear is surprisingly rather restrained and totally wearable; it has always reminded me of helmut lang in a way (www.yokod.com) another designer in the same realm is oliver helden, creative and what appears to be a great technician with again, for the most part, thin silhouettes but wearable clothes; again, i give the helmut lang reference (www.oliverhelden.com) i believe he assists marc jacobs with the designs for the "marc" and "marc jacobs" lines ron-n-ron (first of all, who names both of their twins ron?) are these guys the new american dandy designer? absolutely no helmut lang influence at all but some interesting suiting, more like ozwald boateng (www.ron-n-ron.com) lots of very bright colours duckie brown, i really like some of the looks and cuts and the colour combinations, striking bright shirts with modest grey suits with a little bit of tamed vivienne westwood perhaps, etc., i think that this label is going to have a good future (www.duckiebrown.com) last, obedient sons, i mention it because they have started some sort of collaberation with 16sur20, a men's wear line called "groupe 16sur20" but i have not seen anything from it; as for their own line and subdivisions, i like the creativity, not sure that there is much that i could wear from it but shows promise if they cut down on all the logos on their clothes (www.obedientsons.com) my point in mentioning these names is because we seem to always be stuck on tried and true designers, tailors or lines on this forum and some of the new and upcoming labels that are adding excitement to basic men's wear don't seem to ever get mentioned; agree or disagree as you like
post #2 of 17
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ron-n-ron (first of all, who names both of their twins ron?) are these guys the new american dandy designer? absolutely no helmut lang influence at all but some interesting suiting, more like ozwald boateng (www.ron-n-ron.com) lots of very bright colours
I really like Ron & Ron. For every piece by them that I think is cool, there's at least one piece that I find unbelievably ugly. But overall, I think the label is great fun - sure, everyone is doing clashing color, pattern, contrast stitching, British detailing, and so on, but I can't get enough of all that stuff. (I also wonder what LA Guy thinks about 'em: We know he hates ticket pockets, and most Ron & Ron jackets sport two.   ) In a similar vein to R&R - Waraire Boswell.
post #3 of 17
How's the quality and construction of these labels, and what are some price points? Thanks Dan
post #4 of 17
First 0f all, I'm sort of a minimalist at heart, so my opinions are colored.  My personal style tends towards simple, uncluttered outfits, usually with some layering, with interesting accent pieces and but not extranenous accessories (For example, today I am wearing a light blue Yoko Devereaux tee with black print over a dove gray long sleeve tee, with slightly customized (i.e. repaired with different colored embroidery thread) Da'mage Rekko jeans, black on white Adidas Samoas and a Baltazar Iron Cross belt.  Outerwear is a moleskin jacket over a with a vintage cream wool hoodie with pale blue and yellow highlights.  Rather simple).  
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on yoko devereaux, absolutely love the sharp tailoring, simple but with an edge, and the casual wear is surprisingly rather restrained and totally wearable; it has always reminded me of helmut lang in a way (www.yokod.com)
Have always liked this stuff.  Like Helmut Lang, but cheaper, and I think a little more distinctive and street savvy these days.  The tshirt collaborations are great (am wearing an Adam Walko one right now, and the outerwear is out of this world.
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another designer in the same realm is oliver helden, creative and what appears to be a great technician with again, for the most part, thin silhouettes but wearable clothes; again, i give the helmut lang reference (www.oliverhelden.com) i believe he assists marc jacobs with the designs for the "marc" and "marc jacobs" lines
Discovered him way basck when at fabric8.com, which is great for finding up and comers (they had Nice Collective long before the line was picked up by Barneys, Louis, etc...  In my mind, just okay.  Some of the fabrics are sort of cool (corduroy polo, anyone?), but his designs, to me, are just sort of like a less cool Cloak NYC.  I didn't kbnow about the Marc Jacobs connection, but given the similarities between the Oliver Helden line and Cloak, unsurprising since both labels were started by Marc Jacob acolytes. I say that Cloak (especially in the past couple of F/W lines) has a much clearer vision and kicks Oliver Helden's ass.  Some of the outerwear is pretty cool, but again, really reminiscent of Cloak.
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ron-n-ron (first of all, who names both of their twins ron?) are these guys the new american dandy designer? absolutely no helmut lang influence at all but some interesting suiting, more like ozwald boateng (www.ron-n-ron.com) lots of very bright colours
This label gets a lot of hype, but I would say that their line is mostly just that.  It's like Ozwald Boateng, Vivienne Westwood, and Paul Smith all got really drunk and threw together an amalgam collection without any real direction on its own.  I have to admit that the cuts look decent though, and wearable by regular shaped guys.  Gimmicky though, and ultimately, I think they will fade into obscurity.
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duckie brown, i really like some of the looks and cuts and the colour combinations, striking bright shirts with modest grey suits with a little bit of tamed vivienne westwood perhaps, etc., i think that this label is going to have a good future (www.duckiebrown.com)
Good use of color, definitely, and the cuts are really nice - I will personally get some of their knitwear assesories, but do we need another Anglomania label?  I could see this becoming a big brand, maybe supplanting old Vivienne, or even Paul Smith - the former seems to be getting less and less wearable, the latters collections have been underwhelming recently.  But it won't be something I'll be looking and saving up for, unlike Yoko Devereaux.
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last, obedient sons, i mention it because they have started some sort of collaberation with 16sur20, a men's wear line called "groupe 16sur20" but i have not seen anything from it; as for their own line and subdivisions, i like the creativity, not sure that there is much that i could wear from it but shows promise if they cut down on all the logos on their clothes (www.obedientsons.com)
Liked them back in 2000, when they did less logoed, subdued pieces with cool details (like a plain white poplin shirt with black straps at the elbows, about 2 years before Helmut Lang did pretty much the same thing).  SInce then, haven't seen all that much to be impressed with.
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
all i know further about oliver helden is that marc jacobs hired him for his technical expertise given helden has an alleged incredible exacting memory for technical details, including 80s wear, the emphasis of marc's lines i didn't add cloak because the two cloak guys are a cut above everyone already with their excellent line
post #6 of 17
A distinct cut above but I am rather fond of Junya Watanabe Man. I was never taken with the Anglomania line of Vivienne Westwood but moreso with the Gold Label, and their MAN line which is rare in the U.S. Westwood itself has become scarce after her Soho shop closd down in 2000. Also Carol Christian Poell is laways intriguing, and their river fashion show kept with their unique persona. For a neo-dandyish sort of appeal, Viktor & Rolf Monsieur fulfills a certain niche. Some of Giuliano Fujiwara's collections are appealing.
post #7 of 17
I am very fond of the Junya Watanabe line as well, and some of the things JW designed for Comme Des Garcon are very cool. Yoko Devereaux is at the top of my list as well (*ahem, I started the hype, thanks*), I have four t-shirts, gloves, and working on expanding that a bit. Although I'm not too sure how I feel about those lovely men posing in their undies for the current t-shirt lines, or the more club-oriented designs on their current season collared shirts. I've talked to a guy from YD named Andy and he is a very nice gentleman. It appears he is doing everything around there, perhaps also the designer, but I've never asked. He even expressed a concern with understaffing when I first talked to him about a year ago. US Streetwear designers are really starting to garner some popularity and I think that's great, especially because they produce much more affordable gear. I love Margiela, but $1000 for a sports jacket is quite a large margin over YD's $380 or $480 (forgot) that they're asking for their sweet ass jackets. Anyway, I endorse / recommend / think you should support YD, and others putting forth that same effort (as well as good clothes) such as Unis and (for women) Married to the Mob.
post #8 of 17
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(*ahem, I started the hype, thanks*)
True that. IMO, good American streetwear has always trumped everyone else, with the exception of the English (Duffer of St. George, Griffin, Fake London/FL Genius, etc...), who have their own thing going on. The French do the understated thing pretty well, but are not as innovative as the Americans in general, and the Italians are generally over the top. The Japanese are good, but I think sometimes are a little *too* obsessed with getting historical details correct to make big moves forward. I think that Yoko Devereaux and Unis are two of the best streetwear designers out there right now. Of the small jeanswear companies, I would say that Corpus and Carpe Denim merit a mention on a top 20 list, as does Rag and Bone, but the designers are actually Brits, so that may be cheating. If anyone has a chance to check out Engineered Garments now in its second season), I think that the designer (Japanese) is fantastic, especially for accessories, and stands a chance of becoming the best of what Varvatos and CP company started wanting to do - reinterpreting classic American casualwear in really cool materials and leaner, more sophisticated urban cuts. The designer purportedly sources the original designers of classic stuff and gets them to make signature pieces in innovative materials, much like Junya Watanabe did (Levis, Lewis Leathers, etc...) and still does. The pricepoint is really reasonable too; and the quality often surpasses those of designers that are twise as expensive. Brian, Andy (I think his last name is Saltazar?) *is* the designer for Yoko Devereaux.
post #9 of 17
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Brian, Andy (I think his last name is Saltazar?) *is* the designer for Yoko Devereaux.
Okay, good to know. It's Salzar LA Guy, any luck with pictures of those Engineered Garment belts at Drinkwater's? I didn't know the Rag & Bone designer was an Englishman, but that does actually make sense to me as the designs have more of a London than a LA or NYC feel. Same goes for Corpus.. Very cool cuts.
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
rag & bone is actually three ex-pat brits: nathan bogle marcus wainwright david neville but they work out of nyc and the jeans are sewn in tompkinsville kentucky of japanese sourced denim as for yoko devereux, i've always understood it to be two guys, andy salzar and thomas meus, but perhaps one is the actual designer and the other the finance guy, but i don't know and the name yoko devereaux is a made-up character to front the company
post #11 of 17
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LA Guy, any luck with pictures of those Engineered Garment belts at Drinkwater's?
Do you not follow up on the "Casual Belts" thread dude? I got pics up, and there is one in your size (a 32/80) specially put away for you. PM me directly instead of contacting Gary if you are interested. I have both colors, (black and blue) and can pretty guarantee that you will not regret the purchase (well, I don't). I wear mine with dark jeans and a tee, and the belt is a great accent piece.
post #12 of 17
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and the name yoko devereaux is a made-up character to front the company
perhaps an attempt at fusing Japanese street style with French elegance? It works for them - their tailored stuff really is just that. I admit when I first heard the name I thought, "Oh, it's a Japanese designer then." Then thought, "Oh, it's a French designer." "Maybe it's a Japanese woman who married a French man and changed her name." Then I talked to Andy and realized that Yoko is a made-up character. I always kind of admire that - the Hives did it before, claiming that some guy (I forgot the name) wrote all their songs, who in fact does not exist. The same may go for Stanley Donwood, Radiohead's artist, who is speculated to in fact not exist, but in fact be a manifestation of Thom Yorke.
post #13 of 17
I'll throw one more name out there... I don't know much about the designer, but I've come across a fair amount of attractive stuff by: Hussein Chalayan (sp??) Thoughts?
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
i did a little checking and in fact, both andy salzer and thomas meur are the original founders of yoko devereaux thomas meur had the title of design director but he left in early 2004 to return to school and a guy named troy smith was hired as menswear designer and design director it appears that andy is more of the marketing and commerce guy here's a good article on the company from lucire mag: http://www.lucire.com/2004a/0126fe0.shtml
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
i think hussein is very creative and talented his best move was resigning as creative director of asprey so as to concentrate on his own lines
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