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Sailing rig

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
As a sailor who, because he sails dinghies rather than larger yachts, wears either a wetsuit or swim trunks and a PFD, with neoprene sail boots, I'd like to ask the opinion of people here about sailing style. I could never understand why a sport which required such wealth could bring so many poorly dressed people together (in the yacht club, usually). Admittedly, they may spend it all on the boat and equipment, or they may not want to get their 'nice' clothes wet but I still think the subject of good style while sailing is rather important. Especially as sailing brought us the blazer and boat shoe, not to mention various jerseys. What I am personally looking for are some modern variants of traditional sailing clothes which could be worn with the intent to get soaked. For instance, could one not find a natural material jersey which would act much like a wetsuit? Or an unlined blazer which would be tough enough while sailing? What do people on this board wear sailing? Do they even sail? Am I alone? Must I write every thought in the interrogative?
post #2 of 9
I am under the impression that horse racing is by far the more expensive sport. However Paul & Shark make a fine yachting outfit. They are, I believe in the business of actual yachting clothing unlike say, Polo Sport or Zegna for that matter.
post #3 of 9
What one wears IMO depends on the type of sailing. If you're going to be racing or going out for a romp on a windy day, I'd think function would be the #1 issue -- whether you're getting soaked in a Laser or sitting on the rail of a J-boat. Shorts, boat shoes, a quick-drying shirt and a good hat. If it's really howling, or if it's not warm enough for shorts/t-shirts, then foul weather gear over shorts or sweats. I suffered for one season w/o good foul weather gear, trying heavy Patagonia jackets and capilene shirts; I also tried using natural fiber sweaters, which proved to be worthless once the spray started flying. On the other hand, if you're going to be sipping rum & tonic on the deck of a fully crewed maxi on a leisurely afternoon, then your options are wide open except for needing boat shoes. I can't imagine wearing a blazer except in this type of situation. In any case, I think most sailors wear crappy clothes because they're looking for function first; because climbing around on a deck often means getting soaked and catching clothes on things and ripping 'em; and because (if racing anyway) they're going to be sweating like dogs hauling on the various lines, packing/folding sails, etc. Alas, since getting married and having children, my days of sailing on the weekends seem to be over, at least temporarily....
post #4 of 9
The big difference is power vs sail. Sailors in all but the biggest boats get wet, deal with angled decks, and exert themselves tailing winches and such. In the US, the ubiquitous summer uniform seems to be quick dry shorts, a polo shirt, sunglasses, and topsiders that stay on your feet. Add Helly-Hansen or equivalent urethane foul weather gear (yellow is old school, orange the new wave) for a blowy or rainy day. Powerboat clothing is much more about making a statement of affluence. I have NEVER seen a sailor wear breton red trousers, for instance, even in places like Newport. But they're part of the powerboater look.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Well, I might as well admit it: someday I hope to be rich enough (or crazy enough, or both.) to be able to wear a morning suit sailing. (Unless it's night of course, when I will wear a dress suit. I may be a sailor, but I still will dress properly.) Then again, an old addage springs to mind: 'sail naked, get an even tan.'
post #6 of 9
LOL Comparing the costs of sailing and equestrian activities is like comparing the relative size of two mushroom clouds - either way your wallet is going to get vaporized. ...My love of horses has convinced me that the best way to make a small fortune is to start with a huge fortune and then fall in love with horses. For sailing in the types of ships where you WILL get very wet practicality seems appropriate - for the yacht club I always think about a double breasted navy linen blazer I had from Polo blue label - inside it had a tag that cracked me up "Pure linen - gauranteed to wrinkle")
post #7 of 9
Quote:
I am under the impression that horse racing is by far the more expensive sport. However Paul & Shark make a fine yachting outfit. They are, I believe in the business of actual yachting clothing unlike say, Polo Sport or Zegna for that matter.
I second Paul & Shark, their yachting gear is top notch. Carlo, I think the reasoning behind linen being something for the patricians is that, if you have clothes in linen, obviously you have the money to constantly have all your clothes ironed, since linen is guaranteed to wrinkle. Whereas, the proletariat tends to purchase wrinkle-free clothing for just the opposite reason, they cannot afford / do not have the time for their sartorial items to be constantly ironed. Again, this is just deductive reasoning and has little bearing on the actual overall purchases by people, regardless which end of the monetary spectrum they may lay. Jon.
post #8 of 9
LOL - nahhhhh who needs to iron the linen stuff, if you would all buy a steamer like I am always telling you to you would iron less, spend less on dry cleaning and have yer clothes last 3 times longer, sigh..... Frankly i just love the feel and breathability of linen and don't mind the wrinkles all that much
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
my overall impression is that the look for sailboating is a preppy/old money type of thing: I don't need to impress anyone, i know i'm rich.  
Yes, that certainly seems to be true. Unfortunately for myself, the maxim is: 'I don't need to impress anyone, I know I'm poor.'
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