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Of Macclesfield ties & fudge welts - Page 3

post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmhill
Although I'm not sure I believe these are Macclesfields. I know the second one from the left is because the label says All Silk English Macclesfield

Left to Right: Allen Solly; Neiman Marcus; Polo: Bowring Arundel & Co.; Bowring Arundel & Co.




Max

i guess if i understand this style correctly, all of them but the plaid could be?

incidentally, i just purchased that same polo plaid this past weekend. what color shirt and jacket (suit) do you wear it with?
post #32 of 38
Although it varies sometimes, I tend to keep the colors to gray and white. I usually wear a charcoal grey pinstripe suit with a white shirt. To my eye the other colors do not work as well, but generally I prefer another pattern, so that is why I go with the pinstripe suit.

Max
post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmhill
Although it varies sometimes, I tend to keep the colors to gray and white. I usually wear a charcoal grey pinstripe suit with a white shirt. To my eye the other colors do not work as well, but generally I prefer another pattern, so that is why I go with the pinstripe suit.

Max


max - interesting, i have found the most useful combination also to be with a white shirt/ dark charcoal...although i may try it sometime with a very pale blue shirt. i wonder if it would work well with a pink shirt..
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by alebrady
max - interesting, i have found the most useful combination also to be with a white shirt/ dark charcoal...although i may try it sometime with a very pale blue shirt. i wonder if it would work well with a pink shirt..

I happen to have a pink shirt handy. The shirt is a pink Brooks Brothers OCBD.

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i1.../dscn07992.jpg

I don't think the pink photographed well.

Max
post #35 of 38
[quote=Manton]The distinction is whether there is a pattern woven into the silk or not. Patterns can either be woven into the silk or printed onto it after the weaving (or be completely absent, for that matter).QUOTE]

manton, would you be able to describe the process of creating a print tie in laymans terms...how do they 'apply' the pattern? im assuming that my ties i have that are smooth backgrounds but have 'raised' patterns on them (as if sewn onto the background) are still considered woven ties and not prints but im not sure?

prints i usually think of are ties like ferragamos or hermes or faberges....just completely smooth (even the patterns)
post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton
Macclesfield is a parish in the north of England where French Hugenot weavers settled after Louis XIV revoked the Edit of Nantes and kicked them out of France. *It has been a center of woven silk manufacture for many years.

When refering to ties, "Macclesfield" refers first to a tie made from silk woven in that parish. *It has also come to mean any similiarly woven silk, no matter where it is made. *Traditioanally, Macclesfield silk is made in tight woven patterns, with relatively small designs. *The most common Macclesfields are indeed black and white or black and silver, but that's not a requirement. *They are perhaps the most common because in England and a lot of Europe these are (or used to be) considered the "correct" wedding tie for wear with a morning suit (turn down collar shirt only) or dark lounge suit. *This practice of having all groomsmen dress identically is a fairly recent American invention. *So a well-dressed Englishman or European used to have a few such ties for weddings, christenings, and other "happy" formal occasions.

There is another parish called Spitalsfield, which is in East London, where they make (or used to make) a similar kind of woven silk. *Traditionally, a Spitalsfield design has a larger scale than a Macclesfield.

Spitalsfields is (or at least it used to be) the site of London's largest green market. We took a walk through thirty years ago and the area was quite destitute - very Dickensesque. I beleive it was a ghetto in the 18th century for Huguenot weavers...
post #37 of 38
after reading this thread I have to assume that i have a tie from Macclesfield that is not a "Macclesfield". It feels like a crepe type weave. They are a normal width but kind of short. Any guess as to the era?


post #38 of 38
Texas Jack, Your tie is a Macclesfield without a doubt. The meaning of Macclesfield ties that is actually used in Macclesfield and that is used by many if not most tie makers refers to silks made in Macclesfield. This was confirmed to me by a director of Adamley/David Evans a few years ago who are one of the few remaining silk printers in Macclesfield. I am not sure why some Americans started thinking of Macclesfields as woven fabrics. For accurate dating of your tie you can ask one of the silk museums in Macclesfield - I think that there are two. The label refers to it being woven and printed in Macclesfield which will help with the dating.
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