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Of Macclesfield ties & fudge welts - Page 2

post #16 of 38
The scale on that one is larger than the typical Macclesfield, so it might better be termed a Spitalsfield. But the basic criteria -- tightly woven silk in an all-over geometric pattern -- are there.
post #17 of 38
Thread Starter 
Sorry to beat this dying horse, but would either of these ties be considered Macclesfield? Both are small woven repeating geometrics. The blue is Ike Behar, the red is XMI:
post #18 of 38
post #19 of 38
BTW, thank you for clarifying this. For some reason the word 'Macclesfield' has been stuck floating through my head the last few days and I wasn't sure what it was.
post #20 of 38
AlanC: Yes. J: It's hard to tell, but that bow looks like a print to me. If so, it's not a Macclesfield, all of which are woven.
post #21 of 38
Here's some pics of the fudge welt:
post #22 of 38
old thread, i know - but i was wondering...does a spitalsfield tie traditionally only have one type of geometric pattern on it? for instance, i have seen ties that have sort of mixed patterns (maybe alternating dot and a square in rows) on a tie. are the spitalsfield simpler than this type of more 'intricate' design?

also, forgive the ignorance but do woven ties need to have at least a very subtle 'texture' to it. for instance, are the sateen solid type ties i see woven?

tia
post #23 of 38
The London Lounge's home page has a photo of Gary Cooper wearing a Macclesfield tie: http://thelondonlounge.net/

BTW, I've been looking for one but with no luck. Where is a good source for Macclesfield ties, especially the black n white kind?
post #24 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy
The London Lounge's home page has a photo of Gary Cooper wearing a Macclesfield tie: http://thelondonlounge.net/

BTW, I've been looking for one but with no luck. Where is a good source for Macclesfield ties, especially the black n white kind?
Since the London Lounge Club Tie (made by Charvet) was, I believe, inspired by that one worn by Gary Cooper in the picture, you might check into this tie (in black and white or black and light gray) on the London Lounge.
post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger
Since the London Lounge Club Tie (made by Charvet) was, I believe, inspired by that one worn by Gary Cooper in the picture, you might check into this tie (in black and white or black and light gray) on the London Lounge.

I have this tie and it's even better looking in person.
post #26 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by alebrady
old thread, i know - but i was wondering...does a spitalsfield tie traditionally only have one type of geometric pattern on it? for instance, i have seen ties that have sort of mixed patterns (maybe alternating dot and a square in rows) on a tie. are the spitalsfield simpler than this type of more 'intricate' design?
The difference between a Spitalsfield and a Macclesfield, aside from point of origin, is that Spitalsfield patterns are typically bigger in scale. Yes, the complexity you describe is quite common. Intricacy is a hallmark of both, however, but I suppose it is safe to say that with Spitalsfields, the larger scale allows for more variation and thus more complexity.

BTW, note well that the geographic distinctions are these days pretty meaningless, as weavers all over the world weave both types of patterns and have for decades.

Quote:
do woven ties need to have at least a very subtle 'texture' to it. for instance, are the sateen solid type ties i see woven?
Well, look, all ties are woven, in that the silk that they are made from is woven. The distinction is whether there is a pattern woven into the silk or not. Patterns can either be woven into the silk or printed onto it after the weaving (or be completely absent, for that matter). Certain silk twills have patterns woven into them but a fairly smooth texture. I think a true Macclesfield will always have some "surface interest" and not be smooth.
post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton
The difference between a Spitalsfield and a Macclesfield, aside from point of origin, is that Spitalsfield patterns are typically bigger in scale. Yes, the complexity you describe is quite common. Intricacy is a hallmark of both, however, but I suppose it is safe to say that with Spitalsfields, the larger scale allows for more variation and thus more complexity.

BTW, note well that the geographic distinctions are these days pretty meaningless, as weavers all over the world weave both types of patterns and have for decades.


Well, look, all ties are woven, in that the silk that they are made from is woven. The distinction is whether there is a pattern woven into the silk or not. Patterns can either be woven into the silk or printed onto it after the weaving (or be completely absent, for that matter). Certain silk twills have patterns woven into them but a fairly smooth texture. I think a true Macclesfield will always have some "surface interest" and not be smooth.


Manton - thanks for clearing that up for me!

was also wondering, a lot of the ties that i seem to see in stores are either prints or very 'complex' or busy looking patterns. where is everyone getting their classically beautiful macclesfield or spatsfield ties - any preferred brands or retailers with a good/wide selection?
post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton
I think a true Macclesfield will always have some "surface interest" and not be smooth.

manton, sorry but would you say that a true spatsfield would also have some sort of surface texture (albeit with the larger pattern) and not be smooth either?
post #29 of 38
The patters or types of patterns that Macclesfield, and later Spitalsfield, made famous have become international standards in neckwear. Personally, I like the interpretations that the Italian company Nicky comes up with. They do a lot of wovens with nice surface interest, but colors and patterns that are far afield of what a dyed-in-the-wool Englishman would consider a proper Macclesfield. But then we can't always wear black and silver checks, can we?

Yes, a Spitalsfield should have some surface interest.
post #30 of 38
Although I'm not sure I believe these are Macclesfields. I know the second one from the left is because the label says All Silk English Macclesfield

Left to Right: Allen Solly; Neiman Marcus; Polo: Bowring Arundel & Co.; Bowring Arundel & Co.




Max
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