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Help classify these fabric makers - Page 2

post #16 of 30
Quote:
T4 - without question the old handmade silks from China done the ancient way are beyond wonderful...  but that is NOT what comes out of tie city by the mile every day from high speed looms and dyeing/finishing practices that would make the most mild environmentalist deposit organic fertilizer down his/her leg. I just don't think China is good for the menswear industry - the quality is going up but their key tool is cost.  Until they are willing to respect little things like trademarks why support them?
I agree with you without a doubt, but there are still some small artisanal chinese who still produce some incredible fabric, my wife was recently given as a give a few lengths of incredibly gorgeous silks rivalling the best from Como.
post #17 of 30
In Milan I had a tie made from silk handloomed in Japan. The fabric was simply stunning.
post #18 of 30
Quote:
In Milan I had a tie made from silk handloomed in Japan.  The fabric was simply stunning.
Oh, how could I forget the Japanese.. Did you buy the fabric from the store and had their tiemaker make it for you?
post #19 of 30
The tiemaker had a small length on hand. When he showed it to me all I could say was, "Why didn't you show that to me before?"
post #20 of 30
Quote:
The tiemaker had a small length on hand.  When he showed it to me all I could say was, "Why didn't you show that to me before?"
Don't they like just doing that. You make a selection, then they say.. "ah, I just remembered...".
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Quote:
(uriahheep @ Mar. 11 2005,19:13) The tiemaker had a small length on hand.  When he showed it to me all I could say was, "Why didn't you show that to me before?"
Don't they like just doing that.    You make a selection, then they say.. "ah, I just remembered...".
And not only with silks... also shirtings...
post #22 of 30
Though I have my usual favorites, it's a never-ending process with shirtings.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Though I have my usual favorites, it's a never-ending process with shirtings.  
Do you like Siniscalichi?
post #24 of 30
I've never used Siniscalchi, but I plan to visit on my next trip to Milan. Have you used Siniscalchi? If so, general thoughts?
post #25 of 30
Quote:
I've never used Siniscalchi, but I plan to visit on my next trip to Milan.  Have you used Siniscalchi?  If so, general thoughts?
No, haven't used Sinis. nor Finollo. But they do sound interesting.
post #26 of 30
Regarding Finollo, I've heard opinions on both sides. It seemed that those who didn't like Finollo considered the prices too high. Even those who liked Finollo admitted that they could get comparable shirts elsewhere for much less. I think that part of the appeal of makers such as Finollo and Charvet is that they supposedly made for the duke, among other rich/famous people. Charvet RTW is decent; for the money you can do much better than Charvet custom.
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Regarding Finollo, I've heard opinions on both sides.  It seemed that those who didn't like Finollo considered the prices too high.  Even those who liked Finollo admitted that they could get comparable shirts elsewhere for much less.  I think that part of the appeal of makers such as Finollo and Charvet is that they supposedly made for the duke, among other rich/famous people.  Charvet RTW is decent; for the money you can do much better than Charvet custom.
Well, personally I don't give a *** who they make for, as long as what they produce is top rate. As you well know, there are many 'names' in the shirt trade, with prices that are eyewatering.... and then there are also the small unknowns in small streets who can make magic for incredible prices. Thanks for the heads up on Finollo though.
post #28 of 30
*sits down and re-reads Alessandro Baricco's Silk*
post #29 of 30

William Halstead are making for all merchants like Scabal, Dormeuil and Holland and sherry because they do not weave themselves. Lora Piana have their own looms. Scabal own the mill Bower Roebuck and Holland and Sherry own the mill Clisshold but also weave in Chile at their company named Crossville. Dormeuil own the mill Minova. All these mills are in Yorkshire. William Halstead is a mill that weaves for all of these merchants and is known for Mohair cloths as well as being the biggest mill in Korea at the moment. In fact Zegna have started a copy of Halstead fabrics to compete with them in the Korean market. They are also making Kittons blue fabric as mentioned in another forum. Other customers include Prada, Louis Vuitton, Gucci, YSL, Polo Ralph Lauren, Cheil, Cambridge members, Rogatis, Brioni, Kitton and many more. They really are the ones to beat and I would say Britains best kept secret. For any cloth requirements go direct to the mill via their new website www.williamhalstead.co.uk. They are part of the SIL Holdings textile group who specialize in luxury fibers and are one of the biggest operations in the world. Also John Foster and Charles Clayton are part of the same group for the worsted suitings and also Joshua Ellis for Cashmere wool and vicuna products and now Abbotsford 2010 for home furnishings. I hope this helps.

post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlvdDandy View Post

This list comes from searching the forum. Can someone separate these fabric manufacturers into three categories - first tier, second tier, third tier? Criteria for judging: medium weight/three season fabric; pretty basic navys or charcoals, maybe with some sort of self-pattern; Super 120s-150s  (looking for a compromise of fineness with reasonable durability - it will be a primary suit, but not worn that frequently). I'm going to W.W. Chan in Shanghai this May, and don't want to go in unprepared fabric-wise. I'll post about the rest of my suit plans after I gather a little more information. Feel free to add or correct, but mostly, do what you do best: categorize. Vitale Barberis Canonico Loro Piana Zegna Cerruti Piacenza Carlo Barbera H. Lessor Smiths JJ Minnis Moxon Huddersfield Taylor & Lodge Holland & Sherry Reid & Taylor Dormuiel Scabal Bower Roebuck Wain Shiell Reda William Halstead Charles Clayton Policarpo Guabello Fox Brothers


Hi There. As someone who works in the industry in Yorkshire I would have to say for a bit of advice to cut out merchants like Holland and Sherry - Dormeuil and Scabal as they just buy fabric direct from mills and do not weave themselves.

 

A few names that stand out from your list to me would be in order of the best first would be Charles Clayton. Then I would say William Halstead and Bower Roebuk and one you have missed out John Foster. For Flannel cloths I would say Fox Brothers are the best.

 

It depends what you are looking for as each mill has their own strengths.

 

Fox Brothers would be flannels http://www.foxflannel.com/

Charles Clayton would be high end suitings super 150's super 180's and even 100% cashmere www.charlesclayton.co.uk

William Halstead would be Mohairs www.williamhalstead.co.uk

 

As for the mills is Italy always go for Zegna or Lora Piana But Made in England cloths are the best in the world.

 

I hope this helps :)

 

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