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Post Job Interview - Page 2

post #16 of 36
My big-corporate-behemoth employer makes hiring decisions at the end of the day of the interview. If an applicant were to wait to send the thank-you email, the resulting good graces would go to waste.
post #17 of 36
Having been on the hiring side of the desk I would consider it a nice touch however I would hesitate to add anything to the email as suggested other than summarizing why you think you would be good for the job for the simple reason that in an email or letter you run the risk of being misunderstood as voice tones are not there. All things being equal it may sway the scales however thats obviously not enough to make a hire. Good luck.
post #18 of 36
In my opinion either way is fine. I have asked many people who hire in different firms and it doesn't matter to them as long as it is well written and concise. Thank them for their time, describe something you learned from them and how your talents relate to this. Keep in mind if you are interviewing with multiple people in the same group, they will share what you wrote when they discuss you. If everyone at the table got the same note, they probably think it's indicative of your work ethic. I just went through a 3 month process at an asset management firm in Boston. I had 12 separate interviews. 12 different notes was a nightmare, especially when you meet with a couple of different people back to back. Take good notes during the interviews too. This is what I based my thank you's from.
post #19 of 36
Thread Starter 
I ended up writing each person an e-mail. Each one was different, but basically said the same thing- Thank you for the opportunity, if you have any other questions I'll gladly answer them, yada yada yada. I only talked to each person for 45 minutes to an hour a piece, and they all, with the exception of the final person, pretty much asked the same things. I'd have written a short note and sent it, but the company, an advertising agency, uses e-mail a lot. In fact, its how I got to know about the job and how I set up the interviews. I sent them after I got out of class which was after the place closed, so they probably won't get the messages until tomorrow morning. I just wasn't sure if I should send a message in the first place, just because I wasn't sure if it would make me seem too eagar and kiss ass.
post #20 of 36
Generally, I don't think appearing eager is going to be an issue, unless you start calling or emailing them everyday to discuss the status of your application. A simple email to each place should be OK, even a followup email in a week or so is probably not appropriate if they haven't made a decision by then, but anything more than that might be too much.
post #21 of 36
It annoys me a little bit, a very slight little bit, when I receive an email or a letter after an interview. The background and the interview itself will be sufficient for me to make a decision, and the extra communication feels unnecessary and a little bit pushy. But I know it is customary, so I take it in stride.
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Generally, I don't think appearing eager is going to be an issue, unless you start calling or emailing them everyday to discuss the status of your application.  A simple email to each place should be OK, even a followup email in a week or so is probably not appropriate if they haven't made a decision by then, but anything more than that might be too much.
Now this is something Mikey would do.  
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Generally, I don't think appearing eager is going to be an issue, unless you start calling or emailing them everyday to discuss the status of your application.  A simple email to each place should be OK, even a followup email in a week or so is probably not appropriate if they haven't made a decision by then, but anything more than that might be too much.
I agree with drizz about the follow up e-mail with one caveat. Make sure you have an idea of when they are making a decision on the postion. I have received numerous e-mails and even phone calls a week after interviewing someone, when I made it clear in the interview that no decisions would be made until the end of the month, 30 days etc. That actually put a bad taste in my mouth because it showed they weren't paying attention to what I was telling them in the interview. If they can't pay attention in an interview I am sure it wouldn't get better once they started working for me. Thankfully, every time that happened it was someone that had been eliminated from consideration within the first 10 minutes of their interview.
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Quote:
(drizzt3117 @ Mar. 10 2005,20:29) Generally, I don't think appearing eager is going to be an issue, unless you start calling or emailing them everyday to discuss the status of your application.  A simple email to each place should be OK, even a followup email in a week or so is probably not appropriate if they haven't made a decision by then, but anything more than that might be too much.
I agree with drizz about the follow up e-mail with one caveat.  Make sure you have an idea of when they are making a decision on the postion.  I have received numerous e-mails and even phone calls a week after interviewing someone, when I made it clear in the interview that no decisions would be made until the end of the month, 30 days etc.  That actually put a bad taste in my mouth because it showed they weren't paying attention to what I was telling them in the interview.  If they can't pay attention in an interview I am sure it wouldn't get better once they started working for me.  Thankfully, every time that happened it was someone that had been eliminated from consideration within the first 10 minutes of their interview.
I had one of those nightmarish situations lately. The guy called every two days, emailed, when I had told him exactly when the decision would be made. Everytime, he would tell me how wonderful he would be in that position, and how nobody else would be a better fit. By the third phone call, he understood by my tone of voice that he would probably be better off not dialing my number any longer. Needless to say, I had "eliminated" him as soon as he had uttered the first sentence during the interview.
post #25 of 36
Quote:
I had one of those nightmarish situations lately.  The guy called every two days, emailed, when I had told him exactly when the decision would be made.  Everytime, he would tell me how wonderful he would be in that position, and how nobody else would be a better fit.  By the third phone call, he understood by my tone of voice that he would probably be better off not dialing my number any longer.  Needless to say, I had "eliminated" him as soon as he had uttered the first sentence during the interview.
Isn't it funny how the people you would never hire are almost always the ones who do this?
post #26 of 36
Right, That would certainly bother me, and in the cases that it's happened for me, that was the case, the person was already eliminated.
post #27 of 36
Quote:
 I once got a thank you email from a law student within two hours of the interview--this person must have run right back to the hotel (out of town interviewee) and emailed from a laptop or the business center.  Now that earned an extra point on my written evaluation.
are you being serious?
post #28 of 36
This thread has revealed to me how desperate many are for work.
post #29 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
This thread has revealed to me how desperate many are for work.
I don't know about other people, but I asked because I wanted to show a sign of respect.  One of my interviewers was in an unscheduled meeting with the CEO and the CFO at the time that we were scheduled to meet.  I'm not sure if he had to cut that meeting short to meet with me or if it ended by itself but the point remains that he goes from meeting with the heads of the Detroit branch to meeting with some piss ant college kid who wants to get an internship.  I figured I owed some gratitude to him and the rest of my interviewers.
Quote:
Quote:
Generally, I don't think appearing eager is going to be an issue, unless you start calling or emailing them everyday to discuss the status of your application.  A simple email to each place should be OK, even a followup email in a week or so is probably not appropriate if they haven't made a decision by then, but anything more than that might be too much.
Now this is something Mikey would do.  
Yeah, AC, I just sent my 25th thank you out this morning . You think this is too much. FOR FARMER...
post #30 of 36
Did you wear a brown suit to your interview? FARMER.
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