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post #16 of 30
Thread Starter 
thank you people
post #17 of 30
I believe that there is rising interest in ancient history and archeology at the independent schools. My former neighbor, a classics phd, worked in that area at a Friends school here in Philly and seemed to have counterparts at similar schools. (His wife, btw, is ABD in Renaissance art history and has gone on to a thriving career in interior design.) I'd strongly advise your wife to pursue the private school route. Adjuncting, either at community colleges or liberal arts colleges, is a very difficult path. Part-time faculty really do get exploited, and the students' preparation is often quite poor. But it is also the case that art history and archeology are languishing these days. There's almost no tenure-track hiring in either field, and many institutions don't have functioning departments in either discipline. So there might be some decent adjuncting opportunities out there.
post #18 of 30
I'm with those above who say she is certainly well qualified to be a teacher. OK, public schools may require certain qualifications, but these are incredibly easy to ascertain (i.e., go to the school district/comm. college, etc. web site). Private schools all have their own rules. I am involved (as an alum/volunteer) with a private K-12 school in DC and I can tell you that there are plenty of teachers who only have BA/BS degrees. A masters would be "gravy." To be a university professor, perhaps yes a PhD would be expected, but other than that she should have a vast multitude of options. Plus, an hour outside of NYC there are probably hundreds upon hundreds of private day schools and comm. colleges.
post #19 of 30
You don't necessarily need to have a PHd to be a professor, that guy that we were talking about in the general chat section, that wrote the article about the 9/11 victims (ok, maybe not the best example) but he was a dept chair at Colorado and he only had a masters.
post #20 of 30
Quote:
I believe that there is rising interest in ancient history and archeology at the independent schools.  My former neighbor, a classics phd, worked in that area at a Friends school here in Philly  and seemed to have counterparts at similar schools.  (His wife, btw, is ABD in Renaissance art history and has gone on to a thriving career in interior design.)  I'd strongly advise your wife to pursue the private school route. Adjuncting, either at community colleges or liberal arts colleges, is a very difficult path.  Part-time faculty really do get exploited, and the students' preparation is often quite poor.  But it is also the case that art history and archeology are languishing these days.  There's almost no tenure-track hiring in either field, and many institutions don't have functioning departments in either discipline.  So there might be some decent adjuncting opportunities out there.
A private school will NEVER hire someone to teach art history and anthropology, simply because those aren't really subjects taught there. Teachers there are usually expected to teach several subjects, and subjects are usually the core ones with some electives, like anthropology, but they probably wouldn't get someone just for one course. She could probably be a history teacher, as she is overly qualified in the area of research and such. She would probably have a huge advantage in applying, but it's doubtful she'd get something as specific as in her field.
post #21 of 30
I can answer any questions if she wants to look into auction houses. I interned and subsequently worked for two years at Christie's after undergrad (Art history/Econ at school). Still know some people there, Sotheby's and in the art world in NY.
post #22 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I can answer any questions if she wants to look into auction houses.  I interned and subsequently worked for two years at Christie's after undergrad (Art history/Econ at school).  Still know some people there, Sotheby's and in the art world in NY.
P, thanks. very kind. i will PM you later.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Now that would be one HELL of a commute
But the benefits man, the bennie fits.
post #24 of 30
As a low-level administrator at a private college, I'd say that without a Ph.D., a full-time position at a 4-year school is going to be quite difficult to obtain.   The accrediting agencies are continually pressuring higher ed institutions to hire those with "terminal degrees" (i.e., Ph.D. or MFA).   However, community colleges typically set their full-time minimum as a master's. Part-time teaching is available with a master's in any of these institutions, so I'd say that if she wants to teach part-time that's very do-able.  Contact the art department chairs at the nearby colleges and get them a resume and then make an appointment to meet them.  As noted in an earlier post, part-time faculty don't make a lot of money, but it can be pretty rewarding work. Good luck to her. Edit: Ward Churchill and other college faculty with master's degrees typically were hired years ago before there was the general expectation that faculty would have the Ph.D.
post #25 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
As a low-level administrator at a private college, I'd say that without a Ph.D., a full-time position at a 4-year school is going to be quite difficult to obtain.   The accrediting agencies are continually pressuring higher ed institutions to hire those with "terminal degrees" (i.e., Ph.D. or MFA).   However, community colleges typically set their full-time minimum as a master's. Part-time teaching is available with a master's in any of these institutions, so I'd say that if she wants to teach part-time that's very do-able.  Contact the art department chairs at the nearby colleges and get them a resume and then make an appointment to meet them.  As noted in an earlier post, part-time faculty don't make a lot of money, but it can be pretty rewarding work. Good luck to her. Edit:  Ward Churchill and other college faculty with master's degrees typically were hired years ago before there was the general expectation that faculty would have the Ph.D.
John, thanks. if she was specifically not interested in a permanant and/or full time position - she was on tenior track in 2 universities and walked away, partially because of the pressure - would that make a big difference at a university, do you think?
post #26 of 30
Globetrotter, Given the NYC-area glut of doctoral students, your wife will face some competition even for the adjuncting gigs. My own PhD students have struggled with the level of competition, but they've mostly found niches to keep themselves going. There is always room for someone good. Your wife's background as a curator may also be a real plus in terms of generating an original course. There is tremendous emphasis these days on bridging the classroom and the "real world," and traditional humanities departments are looking for ways to do this.
post #27 of 30
I went to a Day school in the southeast, and we had a few teachers that were part time that taught in only their specialty. They taught two periods a day, and usually were doing it because they want to and not for the money. I took a really cool psychology class my senior year from one of these teachers. He was a new graduate from U Penn and just wanted to fill some time before he went back for his PhD. The students all were taking the class because they wanted to, so it made for a great class. With your wife's credentials, she would be a welcomed asset at most day schools. She could probably work part time and teach a class she is passionate about.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
thanks. if she was specifically not interested in a permanant and/or full time position - she was on tenior track in 2 universities and walked away, partially because of the pressure - would that make a big difference at a university, do you think?
I think that would be a big plus in seeking a part-time or year-to-year appointment. Having a proven track record is something that department chairs seek (and they recognize how lucky they are to find those people).
post #29 of 30
Depending on whereabouts "within an hour of Manhattan" you are, one possibility I might suggest considering would be ETS in Princeton NJ. I know, for example, that they have a Languages Group that, among other things, builds certification tests for teachers in a variety of languages as well as dealing with issues associated with translating a variety of tests into some of the most commonly spoken languages. In the past, at least, testing companies tended to be a quirky hybrid of universities and businesses and would attract an interesting crop of folks and doctoral degrees - while sometimes encountered - were not a deal-breaker in the way that they tend to be in purely academic higher ed institutions.
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Depending on whereabouts "within an hour of Manhattan" you are, one possibility I might suggest considering would be ETS in Princeton NJ.  I know, for example, that they have a Languages Group that, among other things, builds certification tests for teachers in a variety of languages as well as dealing with issues associated with translating a variety of tests into some of the most commonly spoken languages.  In the past, at least, testing companies tended to be a quirky hybrid of universities and businesses and would attract an interesting crop of folks and doctoral degrees - while sometimes encountered - were not a deal-breaker in the way that they tend to be in purely academic higher ed institutions.
I had forgotten about that: I actually worked for them for extra cash. Not terribly rewarding, but worth the time (at least back then).
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