or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Thoughts from a morning at the courthouse
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Thoughts from a morning at the courthouse - Page 2

post #16 of 30
snip...doctors are no better... You are too kind, sir. I think that doctors are far worse. I've seen ties which would break your heart.
post #17 of 30
Considering that litigators are generally in court cleaning up the messes made by the transactional attorneys, I would hope that the latter would spend more time on due diligence and less time picking out nice clothes to wear. (Donning flame-proof suit now.  Showing 1/2" cuff, of course.) Seriously, I agree that attorneys in general dress horrendously.  But I also agree that most men in general dress pretty terribly -- it's just that we don't see them wearing suits.  You can bet they will break out the square-toed Kenny Coles, suits with too-long sleeves, and buttondown-collar shirts when given the opportunity.
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Considering that litigators are generally in court cleaning up the messes made by the transactional attorneys, I would hope that the latter would spend more time on due diligence and less time picking out nice clothes to wear.
Hey, if my firm doesn't expect me to commit malpractice, then why do they have all of that insurance?
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Quote:
(wja @ Mar. 09 2005,16:14) They ought to make you guys wear scrub suits.
We adopted English common law, but not the powdered wigs and gowns.  If we went back that way, at least everyone would look equally odd.
French lawyers wear elegant, flowing black gowns (no wigs any longer). I am so used to it, it doesn't seem odd at all. A lawyer's gown, according to my cousin, a lawyer himself, enables him to feel implicated in his task, he is thus reminded that he works for his client, and that he belongs to the judiciary. The gown is a symbol of universality, of the permanence of the institutions and their capacity to maintain their rites. It also is an "equalizer" in the sense that all the lawyers wear the same robe, thus hiding any distinctive signs such as social differences (this is the traditional justification for the gown's usage).
post #20 of 30
in general, we don't have this issue in canada as in most court appearances, we wear black robes, black or black with grey pinstriped dress pants, white french cuffed shirts with wing tips and an odd set of white tabs around the collar think the uk without the powdered wig it makes everyone uniform but out of court, lawyers generally fall into well dressed or poorly dressed and i concur that the solicitors (the paper pushing tranactional lawyers) generally dress better than the barristers (the court litigators)
post #21 of 30
Quote:
I don't go to court that often, but I have been going for over 20 years.  I have seen a lot of poorly dressed lawyers but have seen well dressed ones too.  In fact, the well dressed attorneys stand out.  There is a common wisdom passed around that an attorney should not dress too well when appearing before a jury.  The thinking is that the jury will assume the attorney is wealthy and, therefore, the client must be too and fashion its verdict accordingly.  I follow this adage by avoiding wearing french cuff shirts to jury trials.  I also find that most judges are plain dressers and am concerned that by dressing too well, the judge may view me as 'not his kind' or as someone who is not serious.  Perhaps it is really true that transactional attorneys dress better as a whole than litigators.
Alas, it is true that on the whole, the courtroom is not the place to find well dressed attorneys. There are some exceptions, however. The last trial I participated in was overseen by a Judge with impeccable style. He wore some very nice suits, and had some of the most interesting and elegant woven ties I've ever seen. I SO wanted to ask him where he purchased the ties, but didn't want to be impertinant. As for well dressed trial lawyers, there are some which are known for their elegance, both in and out of the courtroom. Bruce Cutler, best known for representing John Gotti in his many brushes with the law is a very elegantly dressed fellow. Fred Bartlitt, perhaps one of the best commercial litigators ever, has a reputation for wearing beautiful bespoke suits. In fact, I remember reading an account of one of his courtroom appearances where he destroyed one of his suits with car grime while showing car parts to the jury in a GMC truck products liability case. As for myself, I don't "dress down" for court appearances, negotiations, or other high stakes events. My suits are my battle armor, and I go to war fully armed; 7 fold tie, French cuffs, and shoes polished to a high sheen.
post #22 of 30
"Considering that litigators are generally in court cleaning up the messes made by the transactional attorneys, I would hope that the latter would spend more time on due diligence and less time picking out nice clothes to wear." You should be thankful we're providing you gainful employment by which you can afford all those lovely clothes you buy.
post #23 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
You should be thankful we're providing you gainful employment by which you can afford all those lovely clothes you buy.
I love to use the following introduction: "this is Joe, he's with our business dev . . . I mean corporate practice group."
post #24 of 30
Actually, we trusts and estates attorneys out-dress even the transactional attorneys. By virtue of our clientele, we get to dress like gentlemen, not like corporate drones. Speaking of courtroom sartoria, my Thruston braces, Brigg brolly and cufflinks cause no end of mayhem at the metal detectors I must pass through to enter the probate court. (Imagine the odd looks I'd get if I still wore sock garters...)
post #25 of 30
I should note that the worst-dressed attorneys are generally the Law Review editor/judicial law clerk appellate types who are holed up in the office all day writing briefs with very little contact with the outside world.  I am trying to break the mold.  
post #26 of 30
All problems solved if lawyers/judges go back to wearing robes such as this one (see man sitting, notice the spiffy hat): http://img179.exs.cx/my.php?loc=img1...rothers8lt.png
post #27 of 30
That's what I was getting at Fabienne...sort of a legal scrub suit.
post #28 of 30
Some attorneys dress well, others don't. When I see a male attorney in court wearing something like a gray herringbone blazer, black slacks, and loafers, I figure, well, he's probably a good enough attorney so he doesn't care what he looks like. One thing that I have noticed is that women lawyers get wide flexibility in what they wear to court. I have seen female attorneys wear things like white cardigan sweaters, and, surprisingly, it does not stand out as much as you would think. I've even seen a lawyerette wear fishnet stockings to court. And, yes, I am an attorney, too. Admitted to practice in California.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by YoungFogey View Post
Actually, we trusts and estates attorneys out-dress even the transactional attorneys. By virtue of our clientele, we get to dress like gentlemen, not like corporate drones.

Speaking of courtroom sartoria, my Thruston braces, Brigg brolly and cufflinks cause no end of mayhem at the metal detectors I must pass through to enter the probate court. (Imagine the odd looks I'd get if I still wore sock garters...)


I think you should wear sock garters again. Isn't that what Fogeys like us are supposed to do?
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murrah View Post
"1. Attorneys, in general, dress like crap."

Attorneys who go to court dress like crap...the well-dressed transactional attorneys are back at the office looking swell.

Maybe, but I wouldn't swap your world for mine...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Thoughts from a morning at the courthouse