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Car Detailing - Page 5

post #61 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mblova View Post
Do you use an orbital on your car when detailing it, or do you just work on it by hand?

I have two main polishing tools:

1. Porter Cable 7336 Random Orbital - for most regular swirls in the clearcoat.
2. Makita 9227 Rotary - removing deep swirls and paint defects.

Polishes include primarily the Menzerna line (pro) and Zaino Z-PC and various 3M products. For most of my car buddies I recommend the Porter Cable machine around $110 at Lowes or Depot.

I also use a friend's DeWalt (too heavy) and Flex machines. I would stay away from the Waxmaster type cheaper tools. Just not effective.
post #62 of 341
Thread Starter 
I just ordered the starter bundle from Nick. I'll try it out. As a daily driver with no garage I just want it looking decent, not mint.
post #63 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector View Post
I just ordered the starter bundle from Nick. I'll try it out. As a daily driver with no garage I just want it looking decent, not mint.

Cool. Let us know how it turns out.
post #64 of 341
Pics from recent detail. Used my normal Zaino process:

Simple Green on Tires
Z-7 wash, chenille sponge pad
Z-PC plus PC with Ultrafina pad on "6" times 2
Autogeek Indigo microfibers to remove residue
Z-6 detailer and Pakshak Ultra Plush
Z-5 Pro, Zaino applicator
Z-8 for LSP, Pakshak UltraSmooth









post #65 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
Pics from recent detail. Used my normal Zaino process:

Simple Green on Tires
Z-7 wash, chenille sponge pad
Z-PC plus PC with Ultrafina pad on "6" times 2
Autogeek Indigo microfibers to remove residue
Z-6 detailer and Pakshak Ultra Plush
Z-5 Pro, Zaino applicator
Z-8 for LSP, Pakshak UltraSmooth

Beautiful.

As I mentioned somewhere else in this thread...my detailing skills are mostly wasted in chicago without a car. I do get to put it in practice a little bit on bicycles sometimes though so here is a vintage bike I restored that I gave a nice detailing yesterday (although I was stuck with nu-finish since it was the best product I could find at the local walgreens). The other bikes will get it too but mostly for the rust protection and snow non-stick properties...this is the only one that is so pretty.




This was done low-tech since all the detailing supplys still live at my parents house...process was:
dawn with a wash rag
steel-wool on a few rust specks on the chrome
soft toothbrush for the tight corners.
Nu-finish on chrome and paint. It seems to be somewhat of a polish in addition to sealer/wax (I had color coming off on the cotton rag).

It could use an abrasive in a few places to clean up the paint and maybe a little clay. I got lucky and a lot of the typical ding/dent areas on this bike were covered in stickers which came off with a hairdryer to reveal untouched paint.

EDIT: I should clarify before someone yells at me...this is not a hipster mobile. It has brakes and it is not a fixed gear (3-speed internal)...
post #66 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post
Beautiful.

As I mentioned somewhere else in this thread...my detailing skills are mostly wasted in chicago without a car. I do get to put it in practice a little bit on bicycles sometimes though so here is a vintage bike I restored that I gave a nice detailing yesterday (although I was stuck with nu-finish since it was the best product I could find at the local walgreens). The other bikes will get it too but mostly for the rust protection and snow non-stick properties...this is the only one that is so pretty.




This was done low-tech since all the detailing supplys still live at my parents house...process was:
dawn with a wash rag
steel-wool on a few rust specks on the chrome
soft toothbrush for the tight corners.
Nu-finish on chrome and paint. It seems to be somewhat of a polish in addition to sealer/wax (I had color coming off on the cotton rag).

It could use an abrasive in a few places to clean up the paint and maybe a little clay. I got lucky and a lot of the typical ding/dent areas on this bike were covered in stickers which came off with a hairdryer to reveal untouched paint.

EDIT: I should clarify before someone yells at me...this is not a hipster mobile. It has brakes and it is not a fixed gear (3-speed internal)...

I'm seeing only Red X's...can you check your links?
post #67 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by TC (Houston) View Post
Beautiful. Mannn I miss my 911.

Wait don't you have a 355? I have a hard time feeling sympathetic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post

That looks like some nasty orange peel. BMW is known for it right? Looks like the roof is okay.
post #68 of 341
This pic makes the OP look worse than it is but it is certainly well above Lexus levels. Great car though.

Benz OP is much worse believe it or not. Absolute crap paint on those.
post #69 of 341
Wow, the spambots are really getting into niche businesses.
post #70 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by nate10184 View Post
That looks like some nasty orange peel. BMW is known for it right? Looks like the roof is okay.

Most cars have orange peel. Even the almighty ferrari has some shit orange peel paint. Lamborghinis has the best paint jobs I have seen come from a factory. I don't like the paint that they use but they do a good job putting it on.

Either get every new car resprayed or stand back from your car 5 feet at all times.
post #71 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by turboman808 View Post
Most cars have orange peel. Even the almighty ferrari has some shit orange peel paint. Lamborghinis has the best paint jobs I have seen come from a factory. I don't like the paint that they use but they do a good job putting it on.

Either get every new car resprayed or stand back from your car 5 feet at all times.

Very little OP on the Lambos. The Lexus LS 460 is quite state of the art for production. For hand lacquering, the Bentley rules.

One can wetsand the OP out however but you need a pricey and skilled high end detailer.
post #72 of 341
Here is what I do: ( Though I can not take credit for this write-up)
Please also note that there is some debate about whether you should wash the wheels first or last.


I recommend 3M's General purpose adhesive cleaner. It will help you safely remove the tar. Scrubbing tar spots is NOT recommended. You'll end up removing some tar and putting it on your wash mit. Then this tar will be rubbed back and forth over your paint causing an even bigger problem.

I highly recommend washing your car yourself. Here are some tips:

Wash the wheels, tires, and wheel wells first. You'll probably need two 100% cotton chenille wash mits to accomplish this. Do the wheels first so that when you rise them off, you're not splatering dirty water all over clean body panels. Do NOT use these wash mits on the rest of the car! I do not recommend any "spray on" wheel cleaners. (If you can wash your vehicle enough, you can render spray on cleaners useless because the less harsh car wash solution will do the trick.)

Buy some Pinnacle microfiber wash mits from AutoGeek. You can do the car with one, but I recommend using three (one for the top surfaces, one for the front and one side, and one for the rear and the other side). I actually own several because I often wash both cars and I don't re-use the mits until I wash them in the washing machine. These mits will minimize the amount of dirt that is swept across the surface of the paint, creating scratches. The web site to buy them from is:
http://www.autogeek.net/pinmicmit.html

Use a good quality car wash that does not strip wax. (Car wash will strip wax if you use enough, even if it is of the highest quality. Make sure to dillute it properly with water.)

Use three buckets. Fill the first with plain water to rinse off the dirty mit. Fill the next one with soapy water to wash the dirty mit. Fill the third with soapy water to prime the mit for the next usage.

Wash your car in the shade.

When you wash, use motions from the front to the back (and vice versa). Do not use circular or side to side motions. Do not wipe the same surface over again. This only drags the dirt picked up by the mit over the surface again.

After you clean half a panel, turn the mit over and clean the other half. After each panel, go through the three buckets to completely clean and re-prime the mit. Rinse immediately after each panel so the soap does not dry on your car.

If any spots are left over after you wipe them (such as a dead bug), leave them there. After you dry the car, clean these spots separately with some quick detailer and a microfiber cloth. (This perhaps I don't agree with. To me, the washing environment is more safe because you are using lots of soap suds and water. There is less chance of scratching, especially if you use some water pressure.)

Wash the lowest surfaces on the car last (such as below the facia, under the bumper, and under the side skirts). These are usually filty and fill the mit with dirt that could scratch more visible places on your car. (A lot of people use a completely different mitt because of the dirt)

Use the "perfect drying technique" described on the Autopia website.
http://www.autopia.org/forums/showth...&threadid=5120

Some use a high-powered leaf blower to move most of the water off the car. This works well, but you need to be careful not to over use it and create water spots. A California water blade can also be used to help you safely remove most of the left over water. (debated, so use at your own risk, good for windows)

Use waffle-weave microfiber towels to dry the remaining water off the car. JT International (888-989-4584) sells great microfiber towels and they're really inexpensive. Blot, do not wipe, the remaining beads of water off the car. Blotting is more effective and helps insure that any dust that has settled on the car isn't wiped across the surface. An air compressor will help you blow out any remaining water in hard to reach areas (such as side mirrors, trim, license plates, door jams, behind chrome lettering, etc.)

I want to reiterate the imporance of using microfiber towels, wash mits, and applicators. I won't let anything else touch my car.

Also, waxing your car frequently will help prevent dirt sticking to your car and ease the removal of rinse water. (Some waxes actually attract dirt, more so than others, but it does make it easier to remove)

Additonal information:
For drying technique:
"low-pressure, high volume water is easiest and perfectly sufficient. Take the nozzle off the hose. Let it pour over the top. You will see the water sheet off. Move the hose down to "feed" the sheet as it flows down the car - this will keep the sheet wide and it will carry away more water that way. (i.e., feed the wet part, not the dry part.) This gets rid of about 90% of the water."

Then I follow with my waffle weave microfiber towel and stretch the towel out on the surface. I press it down gently and then lift it off. Presto, dry! You can also take the waffle weave and blot water off the sides. Regular microfiber towels get soaked really fast, but they are great for drying too. Most of the water spots should wipe off. You can use Z-6 spray sparingly for assistance. Spray the towel with a spritz and that should cover a good area. You can even spray it directly to the car for extra power (which is recommended if you don't mind using a little more Z-6).
post #73 of 341
You want to do the wheels first and use a different mitt and bucket as the brake dust can marr the finish on the body. I also prefer both sheepskin and chenille mitts to microfiber mitts. The reason is that microfiber will pick up dirt well and then keep it which micro-marrs the finish. Otherwise microfiber is a wonder product for all else.
post #74 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
You want to do the wheels first and use a different mitt and bucket as the brake dust can marr the finish on the body.

I also prefer both sheepskin and chenille mitts to microfiber mitts. The reason is that microfiber will pick up dirt well and then keep it which micro-marrs the finish. Otherwise microfiber is a wonder product for all else.

I agree I always wash my wheels first and with their own bucket.
Then I use two buckets for the rest of the car.
I use a big waffle weave microfiber towel not the regular mitt. I also blot instead of wiping after sheeting most of the water off.
post #75 of 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by J'aimelescravates View Post
I also blot instead of wiping after sheeting most of the water off.

Same here. Works very well.
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