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Color for Men Case Study: Some Issues in Applying the System to Bluemagic - Page 2

post #16 of 33
I have to agree. I like you in dark colors better.
post #17 of 33
You look better in the winter colors, but having read some of your posts, I think that being a Princeton(?, you are there, right?) intellectual and looking/dressing the part is somewhat more important to you than having your complexion perfectly complemented by the color of your clothes. If you want a balance, I'd second the suggestion to try tans with cooler/less saturated undertones. Dunno if it's not trad enough for your tastes, but A.P.C. makes a nice (very slim) trench that might fit the bill.
post #18 of 33




Pretty obvious, you'd look better in a grey trench. As said there are some grey "tans" that would work, but it'd be sub-optimal.
post #19 of 33
The trench is OK--because the traditional trench coat is tan.

The "true winter" colors look quite good on you.

The darker browns will probably work.
post #20 of 33
Bluemagic, I recently got "color for men" and began reading it. Based on your pictures, I think you look great in the "winter colors".

I'm also a "winter", though I feel like the book labels all asian americans as "winter"...even though the author left it open that asian can be of any season, I find it hard to picture asian being any other season based on her descriptions of the winter colors.

I'm still deciding if I should buy-in to what she says...one thing that is hard is the difficulty in distinguish shades (eg. warm grey vs. mid grey). I wish there was a more recent edition of the book or a website where we can rate if individuals are of a certain season
post #21 of 33
I don't know anything about the color wheel but as an Asian myself, I never tend to wear any colors too close to my skin. I don't know why, I just dislike the way it looks. I avoid tans/browns and usually stick to monochromatic colors. I just feel too washed out if I wear too much at the same time that's similar to my skin color.

But that's just me.
post #22 of 33
another vote for you looking better in the winter colors.

however it's a different "look" (more film student, less poli sci). you may or not want that. meanwhile there is nothing wrong with the first pics.

you just do look better in the second ; )
post #23 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lel View Post
I don't know anything about the color wheel but as an Asian myself, I never tend to wear any colors too close to my skin. I don't know why, I just dislike the way it looks. I avoid tans/browns and usually stick to monochromatic colors. I just feel too washed out if I wear too much at the same time that's similar to my skin color.

But that's just me.

I think that is the gist of what Jackson talks about.
post #24 of 33

Those are really well composed photographs.

However (on my screen anyway) they've all got a sort of murky greenish tinge, so I can't really comment on your colors.

post #25 of 33
BM, you look much better in winter cloths.

Picture 1: the tan trenchcoat is okay but your pants (due to the picture angle) provided some contract to offset some of the muteness.

Picture 2: your face is blended into your outfit. pretty good if your intention is to not stand out.

Matching color and complexion for men is extremely important, more than fit and silhouette.
post #26 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunscreenboy View Post
Bluemagic, I recently got "color for men" and began reading it. Based on your pictures, I think you look great in the "winter colors".

I'm also a "winter", though I feel like the book labels all asian americans as "winter"...even though the author left it open that asian can be of any season, I find it hard to picture asian being any other season based on her descriptions of the winter colors.

I'm still deciding if I should buy-in to what she says...one thing that is hard is the difficulty in distinguish shades (eg. warm grey vs. mid grey). I wish there was a more recent edition of the book or a website where we can rate if individuals are of a certain season

According to a small article in Men's Ex, there's Pinkish undertone or Golden undertone for Asian complexions, each suitable for different shade of colors.
post #27 of 33
I think that the winter photo looks best too
post #28 of 33
I do believe in color theory in a sense. But I don't think it can be judged from these sort of pictures - the color balance is off, and who knows how they end up looking on different monitors anyways. Color theory is about subtle tonal differences and those are hard to judge even in good pics.
post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Harris View Post
I do believe in color theory in a sense. But I don't think it can be judged from these sort of pictures - the color balance is off, and who knows how they end up looking on different monitors anyways. Color theory is about subtle tonal differences and those are hard to judge even in good pics.

Disagree. I am a colorblind and have trouble telling between certain shades of red/green, red/brown, blue/purple, pink/purple, yellow/green, etc. But I never have any problem matching colors; it is the contrast between the colors thats more important. A difference in color balance is not going to throw the contrast between colors off.
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post
i think alot of it has to do with lighting in these pictures.

Though i will say you look better in the winter colors.
Exactly what I was thinking on both counts.
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