or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Cap in a fine restaurant
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cap in a fine restaurant - Page 5

post #61 of 105
Once summer evening I went in a bar with a guy i knew. He was tall and fat and was wearing black leather. The guard at the entry told him to put out his gloves inside. Strange? May be every restaurants should have a cap guard?
post #62 of 105
Quote:
Once summer evening I went in a bar with a guy i knew. He was tall and fat and was wearing black leather. The guard at the entry told him to put out his gloves inside. Strange? May be every restaurants should have a cap guard?
I've gotta quit partying so much on weekends... I have no clue what this means. K
post #63 of 105
Quote:
What was the name of the restaurant? Michael's at the Colony Surf hotel, right? There used to be several resto's in Honolulu that had coat and tie policies.
It was actually the signature restaurant at the Lodge at Koele on Lenai (I can't remember the name of the restaurant). Lenai is (I believe) the smallest of the Hawaiian islands and was once owned in its entirety by Dole. Most tourists who come there stay at either the Lodge or at another resort, Manele Bay. The resorts are inter-related (e.g. you can stay at the Lodge, but also charge lunches etc. at Manele to your room). I highly recommend going to Lenai for a couple of days if you ever visit Hawaii. Great golf and snorkling, and a host of other activities which you can do through the resorts (at a fairly steep price, but a vacation in Hawaii is hard to do on the cheap if you want to do it right). Jeff
post #64 of 105
Thread Starter 
I have been put to the test. It has happened twice in the last three weeks. First, it was at Ruth's Chris Steakhouse, Buckhead branch, Atlanta; about a $80/person restaurant. My wife, our friend, and I arrived 20 minutes early. They asked us to wait in the bar. While there, I saw a man in his late 50's wearing a cap. His party (6-7 people) got their table before we were called. Then, about 10 minutes later, we were told that our table was ready. I glanced in and saw that they were finishing setting up a table right next to the guy. He was still wearing the cap. I told the manager that I was not willing to sit next to the type of person who would wear a cap inside an expensive restaurant and that we would eat at a table in the bar, instead. He glanced in and said; "Oh." He then said that they had a "flexible" policy about caps. He said that if the man had gone straight into the dining room, he would have noticed him and asked him the remove the cap, but the man got around him by going to the bar first. He said it was too late now.  He also said the man had had some trouble getting there. His cab got lost. We ate in the bar. It was a great dinner. Then, last Saturday night was at Oceanaire Seafood Room in Atlanta, also about a $80/person restaurant. When we arrived, they led us to a booth next to a table were a man sat, wearing a cap. I asked for another table far away and got it. The manager came over and asked if we would prefer a booth, but when I told him about the cap, he said that that was the only booth, unless we wanted to wait a while. He also said that they tried to stop customers coming in who were wearing caps, but if they got by him, were seated and were there a while, he could do nothing. I suspect that both restaurants were trying to stop cap wearers at the door and offer them the choice of removing the cap or being denied a table, but if the customer somehow got in and seated with the cap, the places wanted to avoid the embarrassment of having to throw them out. A fair policy. The Oceanaire Seafood Room, where we are also regulars, had been unable to get us a reservation at our usual 8:00 time, so we had to come early. The manager said that would not happen again. He said that he had made reservations for us on every Saturday night at 8:00 for the next month and if we could not come for any, just cancel. That is service. I would like to think that we get such treatment due to my good looks, etc., but I think the fact that my wife and I are fairly well known as frequent dining companions of Atlanta's leading restaurant critic helps some.
post #65 of 105
Quote:
The Oceanaire Seafood Room, where we are also regulars, had been unable to get us a reservation at our usual 8:00 time, so we had to come early. The manager said that would not happen again. He said that he had made reservations for us on every Saturday night at 8:00 for the next month and if we could not come for any, just cancel. That is service. I would like to think that we get such treatment due to my good looks, etc., but I think the fact that my wife and I are fairly well known as frequent dining companions of Atlanta's leading restaurant critic helps some.
And because they know you will not wear a cap to dinner.
post #66 of 105
Quote:
I have been put to the test. It has happened twice in the last three weeks.
Horrible. Things for keeping up the good fight. Once we are rid of those wearing head-gear, we then go after those not wearing coat & tie.
post #67 of 105
All the diners should stare, and make furtive comments to make the wearer distinctly uncomfortable.
post #68 of 105
I'm far from a stuffy person, however someone wearing a cap to dinner would piss me off as well. I refuse to dine with some of my best friends because they insist on leaving the table 2-3 times during the meal to go outside and smoke a ciggarette. How incredibly rude is that? I also cannot stand to dine with more than 5 people at a table. I notice when there are 6 or more, common ettiquette and manners go straight out the window.
post #69 of 105
Quote:
I have been put to the test. It has happened twice in the last three weeks. First, it was at Ruth's Chris Steakhouse, Buckhead branch, Atlanta; about a $80/person restaurant. My wife, our friend, and I arrived 20 minutes early. They asked us to wait in the bar. While there, I saw a man in his late 50's there wearing a cap. His party (6-7 people) got their table before we were called. Then, about 10 minutes later, we were told that our table was ready. I glanced in and saw that they were finishing setting up a table right next to the guy. He was still wearing the cap. I told the manager that I was not willing to sit next to the type of person who would wear a cap inside an expensive restaurant and that we would eat at a table in the bar, instead. He glanced in and said; "Oh." He then said that they had a "flexible" policy about caps. He said that if the man had gone straight into the dining room, he would have noticed him and asked him the remove the cap, but the man got around him by going to the bar first. He said it was too late now.  He also said the man had had some trouble getting there. His cab got lost. We ate in the bar. It was a great dinner. Then, last Saturday night was at Oceanaire Seafood Room in Atlanta, also about a $80/person restaurant. When we arrived, they led us to a booth next to a table were a man sat, wearing a cap. I asked for another table far away and got it. The manager came over and asked if we would prefer a booth, but when I told him about the cap, he said that that was the only booth, unless we wanted to wait a while. He also said that they tried to stop customers coming in who were wearing caps, but if they got by him, were seated and were there a while, he could do nothing. I suspect that both restaurants were trying to stop cap wearers at the door and offer them the choice of removing the cap or being denied a table, but if the customer somehow got in and seated with the cap, the places wanted to avoid the embarrassment of having to throw them out. A fair policy. The Oceanaire Seafood Room, where we are also regulars, had been unable to get us a reservation at our usual 8:00 time, so we had to come early. The manager said that would not happen again. He said that he had made reservations for us on every Saturday night at 8:00 for the next month and if we could not come for any, just cancel. That is service. I would like to think that we get such treatment due to my good looks, etc., but I think the fact that my wife and I are fairly well known as frequent dining companions of Atlanta's leading restaurant critic helps some.
It's nice to know that you like food, but really, get over yourself. I'm sure chefs tremble when you walk in, with your elite food doyens and captains of industry forming your ominous possy of old world etiquette and values. This is America, where many different ideas exist. I don't agree with wearing a hat inside, I think it is boorish. However, even if I'm spending the national debt of Sudan, I don't demand to be sat at another table away from the plebians. For all the class and sophistication that you claim to have, you fall short in tolerance, another hallmark of the well raised. I cannot understand how a fairly intelligent individual is put off by something so insignificant. Yes, it is vulgar, but these are different times my friend.
post #70 of 105
Quote:
I'm far from a stuffy person, however someone wearing a cap to dinner would piss me off as well.    I refuse to dine with some of my best friends because they insist on leaving the table 2-3 times during the meal to go outside and smoke a ciggarette. How incredibly rude is that? I also cannot stand to dine with more than 5 people at a table. I notice when there are 6 or more, common ettiquette and manners go straight out the window.
One used to be able to smoke in resturants. And fine ones at that.
post #71 of 105
It would drive me nuts if people insisted on going outside for a smoke break. However, wearing a cap? I still insist that it's rediculous to care or be bothered by it. I can understand just telling your buddy to remove it, but does it REALLY detract from your dining experience to be sitting near someone wearing a hat? I'm glad that it doesn't for me.
post #72 of 105
Quote:
Quote:
It's nice to know that you like food, but really, get over yourself. I'm sure chefs tremble when you walk in, with your elite food doyens and captains of industry forming your ominous possy of old world etiquette and values. This is America, where many different ideas exist. I don't agree with wearing a hat inside, I think it is boorish. However, even if I'm spending the national debt of Sudan, I don't demand to be sat at another table away from the plebians. For all the class and sophistication that you claim to have, you fall short in tolerance, another hallmark of the well raised. I cannot understand how a fairly intelligent individual is put off by something so insignificant. Yes, it is vulgar, but these are different times my friend.
I agree. I can't stand caps in nice restaurants either, but you really should get over yourself. You sound like you'd be a great table mate yourself.
post #73 of 105
Why should KP "get over" himself (whatever that trite phrase means). The problem is with the slob in the baseball cap.
post #74 of 105
Quote:
Why should KP "get over" himself (whatever that trite phrase means).  The problem is with the slob in the baseball cap.
Yes, but there is quite a problem if you are so affected by it that you and your epicurean goons cannot possibly go on sitting beside that slob. If I found your wife ugly, or if you were well out of my tax bracket, I would hardly find it acceptable to ask to be moved to a different table. I know it's not the same thing, but really, if you're so damn sophisticated, use your sophistication to conjure up an image of a manificant souflee in the place of the cap wearing slob. No one is disputing that wearing a cap indoors is wrong. I just think that there is also something quite boorish about making a big issue about it. In the end you look like a pathetic drama queen with something to prove.
post #75 of 105
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horace,June 27 2005,21:32
Why should KP "get over" himself (whatever that trite phrase means).  The problem is with the slob in the baseball cap.
Yes, but there is quite a problem if you are so affected by it that you and your epicurean goons cannot possibly go on sitting beside that slob. If I found your wife ugly, or if you were well out of my tax bracket, I would hardly find it acceptable to ask to be moved to a different table. I know it's not the same thing, but really, if you're so damn sophisticated, use your sophistication to conjure up an image of a manificant souflee in the place of the cap wearing slob. No one is disputing that wearing a cap indoors is wrong. I just think that there is also something quite boorish about making a big issue about it. In the end you look like a pathetic drama queen with something to prove.
Epicurean isn't the word you're looking for. But KP didn't seem to make "big point" of it, nor was the behavior he described "boorish".   He appears to have been discreet.  Cap-wearing slobs shouldn't be allowed in the restaurant. edit: no one is claiming, except you, that this is a matter of "class" or "sophistication", but rather it's a matter of decency and decorum. If _not_ wearing a hat is sophisticated, then we've got a problem with what that concept means.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Cap in a fine restaurant