or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › How can you tell the quality of a tie?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How can you tell the quality of a tie? - Page 2

post #16 of 22
You got an EXCELLENT bargain on construction, well done. Much depends on what the silk costs obviously. In terms of raw costs your cost was on the low end (you found some good silks at good prices I'm guessing?) and you didn't incur some other costs - design costs of around $400-$500 per pattern and the additional 25% for shipping and import duties and customs brokerage so you did extremely well. Sounds like a fun experience :-)
post #17 of 22
Chuck, I've gotten 7folds made for comparitivly similar prices, Euro 50. A little more expensive in Florence.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
You got an EXCELLENT bargain on construction, well done. Much depends on what the silk costs obviously. In terms of raw costs your cost was on the low end (you found some good silks at good prices I'm guessing?) and you didn't incur some other costs - design costs of around $400-$500 per pattern and the additional 25% for shipping and import duties and customs brokerage so you did extremely well. Sounds like a fun experience :-)
I did get a good rate considering the quality of the construction. I got to see the process from start to finish. We discussed styling and technical details, the tiemaker took a few measures and drafted a pattern on a blank length of craft paper using just a pencil - no templates, unless you count the makeshift straight edge he used to draw the ends of the tie. The silk was then cut using a pair of scissors and sewn by hand except for the joints of the different pieces of the ties, which were sewn using a very simple sewing machine. I had the ties saddle-stitched with self-loop/keeper, with the loop tucked into the spine. The tiemaker used 100% wool tie linings for the symmetrical 7-folds; however, most of the ties were made in the the unlined asymmetrical 7-fold style. The silks I bought were top-quality, (and to borrow a line from The Godfather) "and I've had lots." The least expensive was EU 19/m, the most expensive EU 23/m. All were woven silks, none printed. Among them were solid silks, color-warp-on-white-weft silks, dense silk-on-silk mogadors...
post #19 of 22
As far as large companies go, some of them aren't large enough to have international offices but hire agents instead. Hiring agents adds to the wholesale cost of the goods as agents usually work on a commission basis. It can be difficult for companies to work directly with many different vendors located abroad, hence the need for agents. Also, producers of high-end goods need to get their names out in order to have a chance to compete with companies like RL, which use the $$$ from their low-end-crap lines to fund higher-end but lossmaking lines which they like to have as a feather in the c®ap.
post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
First of all, Carlo, Andy and everyone else thanks for the wonderful input. You guys answered questions that I didn't even know I had.
Quote:
Personally, I am betting that eventually people will get sick of that and the walmartization trend will reverse. No, not knocking WM or globalization... just sayin that I am putting my rear end on the line betting that there will be a slow but percetible move toward less 'efficient' goods toward those with a bit more quality and craftsmanship. If I am wrong... anyone willing to hire me?
I agree with you 101%. This will be especially visible in the west where the rich (and not-so-rich) will continue to grow richer. While we will soon be seeing whole new levels of extravagance in goods (exemplified by things like the Maybach, that silly 700$ stroller, etc.), there will also be those that will choose quality over bells and whistles and whatever will impress their neighbors. Of course, it will continue to be a niche market, but it will be a market, nonetheless. I think it's safe to say that guys like me and you might still be able to win some bread at the end of the day.
post #21 of 22
Actually... before I met Jill I was a solo daddy with a 1 year old. I can assure you that you are better off splurging on your stroller - the ultimate all purpose device. Once upon a time the local mother's day out group baked me cookies as the winner of the 'best diaper bag packer' award recipient. "Check in Chuck's stroller' was the default answer when someone forgot anything from sunblock to wet wipes to ...you name it. If they'd had a $700 stroller back then I would have bought it - assuming we are talking function rather than gold handlebars. ...but I'm weird.
post #22 of 22
The $300 I spent on our stroller is some of the best money I have ever spent. We have 2.5 year old twins so a double stroller was called for, the cheaper stroller run up to 40 lbs. My wife would have had a hard time folding it up and putting it in the car, etc. The stroller I bought weighs 15 lbs folds up easily and compactly. After about a year of use the center wheel broke off, we contacted the company, provided proof of purchase and they sent us a brand new stroller. Nothing out of pocket, they paid shipping.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › How can you tell the quality of a tie?