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Unstructured, de-structured look?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I didn't know where to post this. You'll say: "A women's style forum, of course." I say: they haven't been much help to me so far, and I trust the input some of you might have. Anyhow, J, please erase, ban, move this topic if it shouldn't be here. Here is my question: I am looking for clothes along the same lines as Sarah Pacini (http://www.sarah-pacini.com). Does anyone know of any designers whose clothes are available in the US that would have that unstructured look? PS: I'll be in Europe in May, and I do plan to visit at least one of her stores.
post #2 of 16
The first names that come to mind are Akira, Dries van Noten, and Martin Margiela. I've also seen some Alexander Herchcovitch things that you might like (the runway show is quite odd, but the actuall pieces are pretty interesting - lots of color, if you like that.) Catherine Malandrino is also an option if you are a little bit of a hippie at heart; and Dirk Schonberger has a few cool jackets, if that is what you are looking for. A lot of his other pieces are probably too hard edged for you though. Grey Ant, out of L.A. is a slightly more affordable alternative, assuming you are not a money is no option type of girl. In general, you are probably going to fare best with the Belgians, some Parisians (including Paris based Tokyo designers), and some American designers,) and some Americans, and worse with Brits and Italians. I guess that Ghost (London) might be the one obvious exception. All these designers' collections are available for viewing at www.firstview.com. Good luck. Good tastes too.
post #3 of 16
I definitely second the Margiela recommendation. Lovely stuff.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
This is exactly what I was looking for, thank you, LA Guy. From what I was able to see, I think I prefer Dries van Noten (worth a drive to Antwerp) and Akura (that first red dress in the Spring 04 collection is sublime). Absolutely gorgeous designs. Do you have any idea of the price range? How about sizes? I wear the smallest size in Diane von Furstenberg, to give you an idea, so it's often difficult to purchase anything without needing alterations.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
This is exactly what I was looking for, thank you, LA Guy.  From what I was able to see, I think I prefer Dries van Noten (worth a drive to Antwerp) and Akura (that first red dress in the Spring 04 collection is sublime).   Absolutely gorgeous designs.  Do you have any idea of the price range?  How about sizes?  I wear the smallest size in Diane von Furstenberg, to give you an idea, so it's often difficult to purchase anything without needing alterations.
Dries and Akira (in my limited experience with womenswear - I usually styled guys, and am not a crossdresser ) runs considerably smaller than von Furstenberg (imo), so you should have no problems.  Great stuff - yes, I like the red dress as well. As for price range, at Dries you are looking at lower than Prada but higher than Miu Miu prices. I would say that about 800 USD retail for a dress (stateside) would be not-unusual. outerwear is about that too. I think that Akira is is a slightly lower price bracket. Pick me up good Margiela or Dries belt, and I'll give you even more info Just kidding. But seriously...
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
I've got it all set up: one of my colleagues in Belgium knows the right stores/boutiques, and she'll be going with me. I do acknowledge that I owe you something, so: I'll prepare a homemade meal (whatever national cuisine you prefer) if you happen to be in my neck of the woods.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
I've got it all set up: one of my colleagues in Belgium knows the right stores/boutiques, and she'll be going with me.
Best way to do it. Antwerp is one of the great gems of the fashion world - you're going to love it. You'll see lots of unknowns (even in other parts of Europe) that might just blow you away too.
Quote:
I do acknowledge that I owe you something, so: I'll prepare a homemade meal (whatever national cuisine you prefer) if you happen to be in my neck of the woods.
Thanks As I subsist on pizza, sandwiches, and burritos (except for the occasional trip to take a speaker out to the faculty club) I would gladly take up that invitation. Actually, one of my favorite cuisines is that of Normandy - hearty, simple, French food. The fact that we are getting more snow and cold fronts is making me crave it even more.
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Perfect, one of my specialties is pheasant (or chicken) with apples, flambeed with calvados, in a cream sauce.   I spent all my summer vacations in Normandy from age 8 to 12.  I remember going to the farm house to fetch some milk, and the farmer gave me a bowl of hard cider, as it was in the middle of July.  I was only 10 years old.  Somehow, I made it back to camp without spilling the milk. So, it looks like Belgium is quite innovative these days?
post #9 of 16
Quote:
So, it looks like Belgium is quite innovative these days?
Yes, and has been since the Antwerp Six (Bikkembergs, Demeulemeester, van Beirendonck, van Noten, van Saene and Marina Yeeh) hit London by storm in 1986.  Martin margiela is considered the 7th of the six.  Since then A fair number of the most innovative well known designers have come from Belgium, Dirk Schonberger being the best known example.  Especially given it's miniscule size, Belgium can be considered a fashion powerhouse.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Do you know who is a Flamand, who is a Wallon?
post #11 of 16
No, care to enlighten? Like I said, my knowledge of womenswear is limited, and my knowledge of niche menswear designers is really in the American market only (primarily jeans and streetwear,) and I can only rely on several years old info from Pitti Uomo and the major Italian and London showcases and firstview these days (not being in either NYC or LA right now) for a lot of info.
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Oh, OK. No, I was only interested in figuring out if the designers tend to come from the French-speaking part or the Flemish-speaking part of Belgium.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Oh, OK. No, I was only interested in figuring out if the designers tend to come from the French-speaking part or the Flemish-speaking part of Belgium.
Ah, I've been betrayed by my ignorance. Nearly all these designers are out of Antwerp, and have Flemish names, so I imagine, Flemish. Learn something new everyday. Had a labmate who was a (Flemish) Belgian, and probably should have asked her about these terms. BTW, which is which?
post #14 of 16
It might not be 100% what you need, but the designs look close to a Montreal bigwig's stuff. Philippe Dubuc
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
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Oh, OK.  No, I was only interested in figuring out if the designers tend to come from the French-speaking part or the Flemish-speaking part of Belgium.
Ah, I've been betrayed by my ignorance.  Nearly all these designers are out of Antwerp, and have Flemish names, so I imagine, Flemish.  Learn something new everyday.  Had a labmate who was a (Flemish) Belgian, and probably should have asked her about these terms.   BTW, which is which?
There's no love lost between the two communities, but I am sure there have been inter-marriages (and the "linguistic border" has shifted over time). A few of my friends and acquaintances have "Flemish" sounding names, yet are native French speakers. It could be that Antwerp (Anvers) attracts designers, and so assessing the nationality of those you quoted is not so simple. A Wallon is a francophone, a Flamand speaks a dialect of Flemish and/or the "official" Flemish. I was just curious, because I read somewhere that Flamand executives describe themselves as "hard-working and pragmatic" and the Wallon as "creative and open-minded".
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