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Experience with tightness in E. Greens? - Page 2

post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman
Cusey, you forget the 88 and the 33. Of course, you'd have to use a special order for any of those, but the 88 is supposed to be very nice and has definite elements of the 888.


Don't leave out my personal favorite, the 707. I'll also throw a vote in for the 505.
post #17 of 31
Well, I was discussing squared-toe or chiselled EG lasts.
post #18 of 31
A quick aside about "box calf": it's named this because it is calf leather that has been treated with certain chemicals, in a method invented by a person with the last name "Box".

I have heard some say that this name is used because the calf is often veal, i.e. kept immobile in a box for its lifespan. Although this is true, it is NOT the reason for the name of the leather.
post #19 of 31
Actually, there are many stories about why it is called Box. One indeed deals with Joseph Box, a company long ago acquired by Lobb London. I haven't heard a definitive answer about the origin, whether the leather was used in boxes, shipped in boxes, stretched on boxes, or cobbled by a Boxwallah.
post #20 of 31
Had posted this in hopes that fellow forum members would share experiences of how initial tightness did/did not go away. Any one care to share? Some of you must have worn these things, or you too are victims of "the unworn shoe collection" bug?



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post #21 of 31
I generally buy my shoes tight. Often it takes months and months of weekly wear to break them in fully. The combination of

a. Your foot shape creating an impression in the insole
b. The leather of the upper itself stretching at pressure points

has turned some pretty uncomfortable shoes into near custom fits.

My longest break-ins were the Polo Darltons in cordovan and calf. These are really sturdy shoes with tough leather and double soles.

The Greens I have needed almost no breaking in. I think the leather is thinner and more supple.

These days if there is a hint that shoes might be too big I try to size down.
post #22 of 31
I've broken in three pair of Greens (two D width and one E width). The break- in process on the D widths was pretty painful primarily because I didn't wear them for short periods of time before wearing them for 12 straight hours. They were pretty tight at first and caused blisters where my big toe meets my foot (on both feet). After about four wearings the leather loosened up quite a bit and they have pretty much molded to my feet. Now they are the best fitting pair of shoes that I own. The E widths are probably the worse fitting pair of shoes I own.

I am breaking in another pair now. I wear for a few hours at night and on the weekends. This time around, it should be less painful.
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by billiebob
I generally buy my shoes tight. Often it takes months and months of weekly wear to break them in fully. The combination of

a. Your foot shape creating an impression in the insole
b. The leather of the upper itself stretching at pressure points

has turned some pretty uncomfortable shoes into near custom fits.

My longest break-ins were the Polo Darltons in cordovan and calf. These are really sturdy shoes with tough leather and double soles.

The Greens I have needed almost no breaking in. I think the leather is thinner and more supple.

These days if there is a hint that shoes might be too big I try to size down.

Thanks,

I too find that so many of the shoes in my collection are way too big. Time to find high quality leather insoles. Any sources??


Maybe another member can weigh in on a situation when the EG did not open up to become comfortable.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by oscarthewild
Thanks,

I too find that so many of the shoes in my collection are way too big. Time to find high quality leather insoles. Any sources??


Maybe another member can weigh in on a situation when the EG did not open up to become comfortable.
Allen Edmonds and Tacco both have leather insoles.

I have only one pair of EGs and they are still breaking in, but they have always been snug yet comfortable. I think the 202 is just a great fit for my feet. I thought I was going to need the 10.5UK since they tend to translate +0.5 sizes, but the 10UK fits well and they are probably my most comfortable dress shoes (boots).
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman
Actually, there are many stories about why it is called Box. One indeed deals with Joseph Box, a company long ago acquired by Lobb London. I haven't heard a definitive answer about the origin, whether the leather was used in boxes, shipped in boxes, stretched on boxes, or cobbled by a Boxwallah.
I believe there was a leather supplier who had as a logo, a calf in a box.
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJL
Also, the shoes are a wholecut, which as you imply fits the best case scenario regarding stitching.

That is exactly right. An Edward Green wholecut will stretch and mold to one's foot to a higher degree than shoes with more stitching and broguing.
post #27 of 31
What's the difference between the 808 and 888 in terms of look?

I haven't tried on the 808, but I have a couple in the 888 that felt a bit snug around the toes the first few times. They weren't painful, though, and are now very comfortable.
post #28 of 31
808 is narrower than the 888 in the toe area. In terms of look, they're quite similar, except 888 seems to bulge out to the sides a bit around the cap toe area before coming in, so it's slightly less sleek. I'm comparing an 8.5/9D 888 Mackay to a 9/9.5C 808 Inverness, so YMMV.

--Andre
post #29 of 31
I know this method of stretching will make most members shudder with doubt but having been a fitter for over thirty years we do have our little tricks to make shoes more comfortable. I have found that mechanical stretchers work to make a broad area wider but for a region of the little toe, these stretchers will show a distinct bulge that will throw off the shape in an ugly way.
Here goes, we take a contractors style broom and put the broom section against a wall and hold the handle between the legs as though you were going to take a ride on it. Place the end of the handle inside the shoe at the point were the stretch is needed and with a little pressure work the area back and forth on the end. A little shoe stretch solution inside the shoe helps soften the area. This really does work, I have done it a gazillion times on the best of shoes. And for anyones concern that I know what I say, I was the buyer of footwear for louis for thirteen years. Hope this works for you and if your toe is iritated from the shoes, let the toe heal before you wear them again.

Best Regards,

Gary

"VOTE" www,cbs4boston.com/alist
post #30 of 31
I'm still shuddering....
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