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Bespoke from Singapore (pic heavy!) - Page 16

post #226 of 346
That's a cute pic

I mean things like a threaded lining to the lapels, etc.
post #227 of 346
  • pkiula - in your situation you are forgetting something important: in a RTW jacket the additional fabric allowance is nil to close to nil. If she were to alter the vents to keep their vertical line once she suppresses the waist, they will likely not overlap enough because she will not be able to extend the edge of the sidebody that lies under your vent flap.
  • And 'sartorial detailing' - LOL. 'Threaded lining to lapels'? Are you talking about pick stitching (see here for a poor machine made example)? Theirs is pretty darned good, and by good I mean near invisible unless you know what you are looking for and are looking for it. They are not at all obvious in gshen's pics, and IRL even less obvious, which I consider a massive plus. I've compared their lapel/pocket pick stitching IRL to a Chan, and they are roughly about the same standard if not better. Shame the button hole stitching isn't to Chan standards though, maybe more PL instead.
  • Actually, now that I'm on that topic I would say that Iris is roughly the standard of PL, and IIRC cheaper too for CMT, which is something major to consider.
  • But IMO focussing on 'sartorial detailing' is a classic bespoke newbie mistake, and missing the forest for the trees. I look back at my first bespoke jackets now and can't help but shake my head - in an attempt to get the most bang for my buck I addedd every bell and whistle possible to first projects to make them as 'bespoke' as possible while completely missing the point of bespoke - pick stitching everywhere, soft shoulders, big lapels, contrasting undercollar melton, high chest pocket, fancy buttons, fancy lining design, surgeon's cuff, stitched initials, swoopy patch pockets, etc
  • Focus instead on the fit, on the proportions, and take a step back and re-evaluate what you consider your style. IMO that is where the true benefit/value in bespoke lies. 'Sartorial detailing' should be restricted to what you specify/agree on initially - and just that. If your tailor adds more 'sartorial detailing' unprompted, or (worse) you find yourself progressively impressed with increasing amounts of 'sartorial detailing', then it is at best a yellow flag for future problems with that tailor, and at worst IMO a sign of an unrefined/immature clothing palate in yourself precisely because you are impressed by such trivialities.
  • WRT to the vent shape - her (his actually, her husband does the cutting) cutting pattern assumes a trapezoidal shape to the double vents if the waist if heavily suppressed. I have no idea why it happens, my understanding of tailoring orthodoxy is that this is not canonical but I am unsure if it is wrong per se. My jacket waists are less suppressed than Gerald's, and correspondingly my vents are near vertical.
post #228 of 346
Thread Starter 
^^Clearly, being on holiday has put you in a much more zen mode! +1 to what apropos said. My preferences are graduating towards more moderate suppression though, which should be evident in the future commissions. The trapezoidal vents aren't a huge deal to me as well, and it seems this is just the way they were taught to do things. I have jackets from Iris and one from PL (though not made for me) and also inspected a few Chan suits, and generally agree with the 'hierarchy' proposed. Fit aside, in terms of finishing, the handwork on PL's is generally a fair bit less refined than Iris'. Chan's trousers (hardware, but esp. the handwork on the waist curtaining) as well as buttonholes (DAMN!) are the only things that really stood out, IMHO at least.
post #229 of 346
Heh, thanks G. Oh, Chan's hardware is superlative. Who knew a $2 clip would make such a big difference to a $2000 suit??! PS: she managed to fit me in today - 9-10pm fitting session! They had turned the airconditioning off by then - bespoke lesson #136: being fitted with a 13oz tweed in 30C heat is extremely uncomfortable.
post #230 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkiula View Post
That's a cute pic

I mean things like a threaded lining to the lapels, etc.

I checked dictionary when I read this yesterday.
post #231 of 346
Having recently commissioned a few things from Iris Tailor (suit, tweed odd jacket), I'd like to say I have been very happy with their work and approach so far. I have yet to take delivery of the final goods, but have had multiple fittings with them, and have been very pleased with the cut of the garments, pattern matching, etc.

I'm curious as to why you find their work "ordinary"? It is easy to make this claim without clear justification, and I'd been interested to hear what you have to say... Have you only had them alter your suits, or have you also commissioned bespoke garments from them? I think the only fair comparison would be to compare bespoke garments from different makers; as apropos and gshen note, comparing a bespoke product from another maker with alterations to a RTW garment is like apples and oranges...

I am also curious to see examples of bespoke garments from other Singapore tailors. Do you have images of Anthony Chan's work? I would be curious to see his garments. The work I've seen from Joe's IRL has been disappointing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pkiula View Post
Thanks apropos.

Will just pipe in here. Iris Tailor seems to be getting a lot of bandwidth here. Encouraged by this I recently went there for some alterations to older suits that just need to be nipped in at the waist.

The work, frankly, is very ordinary.

The sign of a good tailor is that when the waist is nipped in a suit, the vents below it are also correspondingly adjusted to be straightened out. Otherwise, it will flare out like a frock at the bottom, which is exactly what happens in the visuals of the original poster here.

There are several very cost-effective tailors, such as Anthony Chan in Far East Square (next to Hilton) on the 4th floor. His suits have been magnificent, he comes highly recommended on many online forums, and he fully canvasses them + gives them nice details.

To original poster: you seem to be happy with some very ordinary suits with zero sartorial detailing.
post #232 of 346
Are there any tailors in Singapore able to shorten the sleeves of a suit from the shoulder and take out some padding from the shoulder with delightful results ?
post #233 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by gshen View Post
WTF is sartorial detailing?

This?
- WTF!

Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post
  • pkiula - in your situation you are forgetting something important: in a RTW jacket the additional fabric allowance is nil to close to nil. If she were to alter the vents to keep their vertical line once she suppresses the waist, they will likely not overlap enough because she will not be able to extend the edge of the sidebody that lies under your vent flap.

  • And 'sartorial detailing' - LOL. 'Threaded lining to lapels'? Are you talking about pick stitching (see here for a poor machine made example)? Theirs is pretty darned good, and by good I mean near invisible unless you know what you are looking for and are looking for it. They are not at all obvious in gshen's pics, and IRL even less obvious, which I consider a massive plus. I've compared their lapel/pocket pick stitching IRL to a Chan, and they are roughly about the same standard if not better. Shame the button hole stitching isn't to Chan standards though, maybe more PL instead.

  • Actually, now that I'm on that topic I would say that Iris is roughly the standard of PL, and IIRC cheaper too for CMT, which is something major to consider.

  • But IMO focussing on 'sartorial detailing' is a classic bespoke newbie mistake, and missing the forest for the trees. I look back at my first bespoke jackets now and can't help but shake my head - in an attempt to get the most bang for my buck I addedd every bell and whistle possible to first projects to make them as 'bespoke' as possible while completely missing the point of bespoke - pick stitching everywhere, soft shoulders, big lapels, contrasting undercollar melton, high chest pocket, fancy buttons, fancy lining design, surgeon's cuff, stitched initials, swoopy patch pockets, etc

  • Focus instead on the fit, on the proportions, and take a step back and re-evaluate what you consider your style. IMO that is where the true benefit/value in bespoke lies. 'Sartorial detailing' should be restricted to what you specify/agree on initially - and just that. If your tailor adds more 'sartorial detailing' unprompted, or (worse) you find yourself progressively impressed with increasing amounts of 'sartorial detailing', then it is at best a yellow flag for future problems with that tailor, and at worst IMO a sign of an unrefined/immature clothing palate in yourself precisely because you are impressed by such trivialities.

  • WRT to the vent shape - her (his actually, her husband does the cutting) cutting pattern assumes a trapezoidal shape to the double vents if the waist if heavily suppressed. I have no idea why it happens, my understanding of tailoring orthodoxy is that this is not canonical but I am unsure if it is wrong per se. My jacket waists are less suppressed than Gerald's, and correspondingly my vents are near vertical.
- this man speaks the truth
post #234 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by gshen View Post
WTF is sartorial detailing?

This?

That suit and the shirt are just items of utter stupidity. That is not detailing at all.
post #235 of 346
Gshen, I've noticed all of the jackets have what seem very short sleeves? While I prefer shorter than the knuckle length that is considered "correct" some of the pics they seem to be at your wristbone or even higher.

Also, on the tweed did you choose such open quarters? I think it looks a bit odd being so open. I do like the overall style of suits/jackets you've had made so far though.


If I make it back to Singapore I must hit Orchard Road this time and stop in Lucky Square to see Iris and some of the others mentioned.
post #236 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkiula View Post
There are several very cost-effective tailors, such as Anthony Chan in Far East Square (next to Hilton) on the 4th floor. His suits have been magnificent, he comes highly recommended on many online forums, and he fully canvasses them + gives them nice details.
It's Anthony TAN for that matter. And I seriously doubt your judgement after banishing Iris' reputation based on their alteration work and singing Anthony Chan, no, TAN's praises after seemingly having not even stepped into his store and made up anything yet.
post #237 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icehawk View Post
Gshen, I've noticed all of the jackets have what seem very short sleeves? While I prefer shorter than the knuckle length that is considered "correct" some of the pics they seem to be at your wristbone or even higher.

I don't think there is a correct sleeve length. It's mostly personal preference. However, I do not like knuckle length at all. I prefer wrist bone length. I think Phat Guido does it best -

post #238 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkiula View Post

There are several very cost-effective tailors, such as Anthony Chan in Far East Square (next to Hilton) on the 4th floor. His suits have been magnificent, he comes highly recommended on many online forums, and he fully canvasses them + gives them nice details.

I don't think Anthony Tan is cost-effective at all.

For my first ever MTM shirt and when I knew close to nothing about clothes, I paid about S$120 for a shirt with plastic buttons, too long sleeves he told me were ok, and frankly speaking, poor fabric.

At PL in HK you can get a mother of pearl shirt in nice two-ply cotton for S$50. Sure, he's an exception but over at CYC, an establishment that some consider overpriced, you can get a Thomas Mason shirt with Mother-of-Pearl buttons and significantly more "sartorial detailing" in the form of initials on the shirt cuff, etc for S$160.
post #239 of 346
Gshen, do you know Iris Tailor's email contact? I left one of my commissions with them before I left the country for my studies, and promised to email them to arrange my last fitting for when I return on holiday -- then promptly realized I lost their card. =(
post #240 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbc View Post
At PL in HK you can get a mother of pearl shirt in nice two-ply cotton for S$50. Sure, he's an exception but over at CYC, an establishment that some consider overpriced, you can get a Thomas Mason shirt with Mother-of-Pearl buttons and significantly more "sartorial detailing" in the form of initials on the shirt cuff, etc for S$160.

I am a frequent customer of CYC -- they have good service and are very very very accommodating to do any sort of "sartorial detailing" you want, be it contrast linings for cuffs, changing the style of stitching used for the seams, monogramming, or even inventing new collar types. And frankly, they don't try to fleece you if you sound foreign. I think it's a great establishment.
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