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post #46 of 143
Jordan's "Wheel of Time" is definitely worth looking into. Just grab the first book and decide for yourself if you like it. Two problems though: As mentioned before there is a considerable drag starting at around book six, pace starts up again with book ten. And Jordan died before he was able to finish it. He told the ending to his wife and son and another author is working on it now.

George R. R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" is very good. But it is an unfinished work as well. Judging by Martin's writing speed (and all of his other projects) it will be at least another five, maybe even ten years for the final book to be published. I hope he is not going to pull a Jordan on us.

I have read a lot of Fantasy novels - it's not a good sign that I can't recommend many on short notice. A few of them have been listed already.
Robin Hobb's "Farseer Trilogy" is worth mentioning.

No more Science Fiction? Are you sure? A pity. One of my all time favorites is Neil Stephenson's "Snow Crash". I like his writing style in general.
post #47 of 143
I think Snow Crash is probably one of the most overrated science fiction books ever, and the fact that people say that it's better than Neuromancer makes me cry. The farseer trilogy is pretty good, especially if you read all the Assasssin/Golden Fool trilogy first. I've always liked David Feintuch's The Still/The King.. pretty different. A personal favorite is the "Monarchies of God" series, which is actually far more realistic and accurate (especially in the military situations) than most fantasy. You can read about it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchies_of_God Then there's the Malazan, which reads like it was written by a robot trying to approximate good prose.
post #48 of 143
Thread Starter 
I didn't say I was never reading any more sci-fi. I've read Snow Crash, it was good. It wasn't better than Neuromancer but may have been more entertaining.
post #49 of 143
It's been a long time so not sure if I'd enjoy the story now that I'm older but I remember liking Tad Williams' "Dragonbone Chair" trilogy. The books are called Memory, Thorn and Sorrow. Starts off slow and is quite similar to LotR but different enough to be enjoyable.
post #50 of 143
My favorite is Orson Scott Card... Ender's Game, and parallel Ender's Shaddow and Treason, amongst others
post #51 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart View Post
yes I have, back when I was reading Elric I got really caught up in his various "Eternal Champion incarnations" and read most of the tangent series, tho I hardly remember them now I do know that I loved them back in the day

I haven't read much fantasy but Ekric was tipo as it reads as an inverdsion og thr genre.
post #52 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master-Classter View Post
My favorite is Orson Scott Card... Ender's Game, and parallel Ender's Shaddow and Treason, amongst others
+1 Gene Wolfe - Soldier of the Mist - Read only if you are ok with unreliable narrators. Dave Duncan - man of his word, the seventh sword - I kind of like this, as the characters are more ruthless and not comic book hero/villian. Robert E Howard - Conan. Fritz Leiber - swords series - This and Elric probably first anti heroes in fantasy.
post #53 of 143
The Chrysalids is a classic.
post #54 of 143
David Zindell's Neverness and its sequels aren't bad.
post #55 of 143
Guy Gavriel Kay - Tigana. A wonderful, single-volume epic. Really one of the best in it's genre, and the reasonable lenght (for a fantasy book anyways) def works in it's favour.
post #56 of 143
Most popular epic fantasy series are time-wasting crap. A Song of Ice and Fire is pretty good, though. If you want something to reinvigorate your youthful sense of wonder (which obviously is a big raison d'etre for the genres) while giving your adult brain some pleasure, check out: Gene Wolfe, Book of the New Sun tetralogy China Mieville, Perdido Street Station, The Scar, and to a lesser extent Iron Council (three standalone novels set in the same imagined world) M. John Harrison, Viriconium and Light John Crowley, Little, Big K. J. Bishop, The Etched City and if you're truly ambitious: Mervyn Peake, Gormenghast trilogy
post #57 of 143
+1 on George RR Martin's a Song of Ice and Fire series. In his books the baddies are well defined which is a nice divergence from normal Fantasy. From Weis & Hickman I verry much liked the Death Gate Cycle. Certainly the first books (of 7) made me laugh a couple of times and there is plenty of well written action. For better written action sequences am sideing with Flambeur, Peter F. Hamilton's The Night's Dawn trilogy is imo one of the best in it's genre. Its scifi though. But if you enjoy those it's good to know that Hamilton is a prolific writer. You may want to stop reading before he stops writing (me not so much). Best of all imo are Heroes die and Blade of Tyshalle by Matthew Woodring Stover. (doubting while writing if one should put capslock on). Better action scenes I have not yet read and the main character is a bad ass! FYI: They are Fantasy with some Scfifi thrown in. Orson Scott Card I like. Is SF though. David Gemmel writes simple fantasy. Hero starts of as a nobody. Finds himself, finds a girl, saves the nation and inbetween does all the heroic stuff. Not much character interaction. The farseer trilogy is well written but if like me your middle name is 'Depression' perhaps not for you. If you watch European movies you know what I mean when I say they have European endings, but not the titty flash in the first 10 minutes (Dutch movies simply rule). Terry Goodkind, what can I say. Before you start reading his work Look at the picture that is on the inside of the backcover. Yes that ís the writer himself there. Truly. Now there is a narcistic person who writes about a hero figure who is everything he is by looks and presumebly character, but better. The main character is a bore, but what is realy wrong with the books is the sheer adulation all the other characters feel for him. I remember one part which went along the line of this (can't recall the exact words) "He is so masterful, daring, beautiful commanding, muscled, powerful, intelligent..." I don't know how to go on. Goodkind could! Had to sell them and felt almost as good as when I tore Ayn Rand's Atlas shrugged in half to protect further generations from that drivel. I'm sorry if I stepped on anybodys toes. I guess I feel so emotional about it, it had to come out Cheers, CDFS
post #58 of 143
Fuck Orson Scott Card. He went totally insane. He also believes homosexuality should be illegal.
post #59 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDFS View Post
Terry Goodkind, what can I say. Before you start reading his work Look at the picture that is on the inside of the backcover. Yes that ís the writer himself there. Truly. Now there is a narcistic person who writes about a hero figure who is everything he is by looks and presumebly character, but better. The main character is a bore, but what is realy wrong with the books is the sheer adulation all the other characters feel for him. I remember one part which went along the line of this (can't recall the exact words) "He is so masterful, daring, beautiful commanding, muscled, powerful, intelligent..."

I don't know how to go on. Goodkind could!
Had to sell them and felt almost as good as when I tore Ayn Rand's Atlas shrugged in half to protect further generations from that drivel.
lol, I just bitched about him a couple days ago in the "things that are pissing you off thread".

You forgot to mention that he is a sadistic, woman-hating asshole who is obsessed with rape.

His books are also very preachy and repetitive.
post #60 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post
Fuck Orson Scott Card. He went totally insane. He also believes homosexuality should be illegal.

That doesn't necessarily mean his books are bad though.
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