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The official thrift/discount store bragging thread - Page 10

post #136 of 115892
If you have a keen eye and visit thrift stores regularly,you will definitely find some great stuff. My latest find-a beautiful pair of near new (black) Alden split toe bluchers for $4.99. A friend of mine commented-"Why do you have all the luck?" the answer is I believe you have to make your luck by being dedicated if not relentless.If you go to a thrift store and come up with nothing,you should regularly visit.Stock comes in on a daily basis.There's no telling which affluent person is cleaning their closet as we speak.
post #137 of 115892
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(Tokyo Slim @ June 17 2005,01:51) Anyone know who Bullock And Jones are? And maybe thusly, how old these shoes are?
Bullock & Jones is a high end San Francisco retailer, recently relaunched, I believe. Congratulations on your amazing find. I've yet to see any shoes worth having on my thrift store visits. Yesterday's visit was a complete strike out on all counts, too. *sigh*
Am I the only one that's annoyed that they don't have any brands listed on their site for more than half the categories? 'Houndsooth jacket,' 'lizardskin belt,' 'knightsbridge dot tie.' Do they just do licensing for those items, then? Hence, they are all 'Bullock and Jones' brand?
post #138 of 115892
Bullock & Jones has undergone a few identity changes. Originally it was a Union Square purveyor of high-quality classic clothing, with much private-label stuff and Greens -- sort of a Paul Stuart West. At some point it folded and/or was folded into Saks, which put the Bullock & James name on some midline garments of middling quality. Recently it has been relaunched as a shop and web/catalog. It appears to be again trying to go for that Paul Stuart-goes-to-SF vibe. Thus, much private-label stuff. Merchandise doesn't seem as high end as it used to be.
post #139 of 115892
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Bullock & Jones has undergone a few identity changes.  Originally it was a Union Square purveyor of high-quality classic clothing, with much private-label stuff and Greens -- sort of a Paul Stuart West.  At some point it folded and/or was folded into Saks, which put the Bullock & James name on some midline garments of middling quality.  Recently it has been relaunched as a shop and web/catalog.  It appears to be again trying to go for that Paul Stuart-goes-to-SF vibe.  Thus, much private-label stuff.  Merchandise doesn't seem as high end as it used to be.
I remember when Bullock & Jones was around. Good way to think of it: as a P Stuart W. I just picked up an early example (though seemingly unworn) of a Bean chamois shirt. But it was $7 in the boutique section of the thrift shop. I don't care for these shops within shops.
post #140 of 115892
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I just picked up an early example (though seemingly unworn) of a Bean chamois shirt.  But it was $7 in the boutique section of the thrift shop. I don't care for these shops within shops.
There's an out of town thrift shop I visit sometimes that has a 'boutique', which basically includes designer clothes (often from diffusion lines) that someone who works for them must sort of recognize. I've purchased some pretty good stuff from there (a Brooks Brothers db blazer in pretty much new condition for $5, for example) but never anything from the boutique. All the best stuff is still out in the general goods. The point being, as you suggest, it's silly to have a boutique in a thrift shop when the people there don't really know how to distinguish quality anyway.
post #141 of 115892
Now come on, though. The boutiques are really very entertaining--quite a window into the psyche of the thrift store management, if nothing else. But I too have never found anything good in a boutique section. Seems like they serve as a temporary way station for all the Structure and Claiborne jackets, Stafford dress shirts, Reaction shoes, etc. while the good stuff lurks arranged by color with everything else. No spectacular finds for me lately. The best I've done is a couple of suits (blue windowpane side-vented Brioni and RLPL summer weight grey wool pinstripe) and a really cool Dege bespoke heavy cotton robe with the previous owner's initials prominently displayed on the breast pocket in a vaguely Oriental style--very old-time San Francisco. Even though I would never consider monogramming something with my own initials, I do enjoy seeing these examples of an apparently vanishing craft.
post #142 of 115892
I forgot to mention that I did see in the general population of thrift duds, a couple of Dun"heel" (made in England) and Lanvin suits. Ernie would've been stunned.
post #143 of 115892
I guess I'll join in on the bragging since I am frequent visitor to thrift stores. I got the 9 shirts that I put up on the buying and selling forum (including 6 Turnbull & Asser shirts) for $1.25 per shirt. Unfortunately they were not my size or I would have been set for a while with shirts . I also picked up some Alden tasell loafers a few weeks ago for $6 which are pretty close to my size (the are a little too narrow). However, I still feel a little wierd wearing tassel loafers since I am 24. Oh, and I also found some cool old brown wingtip footjoy golf shoes for $5, which is definately an improvement from the new balances that I have been wearing to play golf.
post #144 of 115892
The Goodwill stores here in Austin got pretty bad about the "boutique" thing about a year or so back.  It got to the point where they had ordinary Hilfiger and RL Polo shirts for $20, Dockers pants for $13.  I think a lot of people started complaining.  I assume stuff with prices like that didn't sell very fast either.  Anyway, they went to a fixed price policy.  $5 for shirts $7 for pants, etc.  Now the "boutique" idea is starting to creep back in again.  Not quite as bad as it was before so far.  It really is funny what they consider "boutique."   The Goodwill in the better part of town never went to fixed prices. They originally had most things at around $8, but now $10 is a typical price.  That's pretty high for a thrift store, but they have really good stuff there and the store is well kept, so I don't mind too much. They seem to have a better idea of what is good, for instance most anything Italian, Saks or NM is $10-$13. But they also include RL, Hilfiger, Claiborn, etc at that level.   I was just at that store yesterday and they had gotten in about 15-20 Tommy Bahama Silk shirts that were in like new condition.  I picked up three- two button fronts for $13 each and one polo style for $8.  I almost passed them over because the tag indicated a size small (and the price was pushing it too).  But after I looked at a couple I realized they were bigger and after trying them on I figure they are probably really a size large, but not as big as a typical Tommy Bahama large.  I also got a Zegna tie and Contess Mara tie for $2 each, so that made up for the shirts being a little high.  My luck appears to be changing on thrift store ties.   A few weeks ago at a Goodwill where I never find anything good I found three pairs of Zanella pants right next to each other.  Damn close to a perfect fit too.   mike
post #145 of 115892
mbell, I believe we're the only two Austinites on this forum. I haven't done much thrift store shopping in town. Do you have any recommendations?
post #146 of 115892
Thread Starter 
Today's finds: Two pairs of Snap-Link and Kum-a-Part cufflinks from a local antique store I very rarely remember to check, $10 each. Very cool. I really like this kind because they are somewhat unique and also very convenient. You can fumble with the links just once, before putting on the shirt, and not worry about them again.
post #147 of 115892
nice-looking palmistry text. what is it?
post #148 of 115892
Thread Starter 
It's from the Illustrated Anthology of Sorcery, Magic and Alchemy by Emile Grillot de Givry. (Garage sale, $0.25 ) The pictures are attributed to L'Art de Chyromance by Andre Corvo.
post #149 of 115892
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mbell, I believe we're the only two Austinites on this forum. I haven't  done much thrift store shopping in town. Do you have any recommendations?
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mbell, I believe we're the only two Austinites on this forum. I haven't  done much thrift store shopping in town. Do you have any recommendations?
Yes, I think we are the only two Austinites.  I think there is one former Austinite and a few other Texans around. As for thrift stores, I have the best luck with the Goodwill on Lake Austin Blvd.  That's the one I referred to in my earlier post.  Their prices are higher than typical thrift stores, but they have good stuff.  The Goodwill on 183 near Burnet is very large, so you have a decent chance of finding something good.  Although I don't seem to get as many good finds there as I used to.  The one on Brodie is OK and very close to my house.  I hit the other Goodwills from time to time, but those three are my regulars.   One excellent source for deals is the annual Settlement Home sale. It usually occurs in October and is held at the Palmer Events Center.  Shirts and pants are $4.  Suits and jackets are individually marked, but usually about $10-$25. Ties are $1. They don't have dressing rooms, but they have yardsticks and tape measures available.  Every year I buy around 20 or so pieces.  I can usually get some good hangers and other accessories like shoe trees.     Top Drawer on Burnet and 49th is small but usually has some decent stuff.  There's a new thrift stored across the street from Top Drawer that is also small but seems to have good stuff.   Not a thrift store, but I highly recommend Second Looks.  They are a consignment store with one location next to Last Call at Brodie Oaks and another on Mesa between Steck and Anderson.  The best deals are on the higher end stuff.  I got a Zegna Su Misura suit there for $130. They mark stuff down that doesn't sell after a month.  Also, get on their mailing list and they will send you coupons, gift certificates and notices of sales.         mike
post #150 of 115892
I am a former Austinite; graduated in 2003. Top Drawer was good. In the south there were some larger goodwills but my mental map is fuzzy. Now I'm in NYC, where folks throw out Charvet shirts every day after breakfast
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