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DIY Indian food - Page 2

post #16 of 20
Sikhs are not allowed to eat halal meat.

Tandoori style chicken for instance was invented by a Hindu Punjabi called Gujral who cooked meats in the clay oven instead of the usualy flat breads. This is a very popular dish in the USA while curries are most popular in the UK. Also curries are typical Indian dishes and have not been introduced by 'foreigners' in history.

Now, the Indian style from Hyderabad and the Mughlai cuisine are very popular in the west. Both cuisines reached their peak in India. Sure Mughal style cuisine was introduced by central Asians but Indian style spices were added, and their culinary level reached their peaks in India. Then there's a similar style which is called Awadhi cuisine from the city of Lucknow which is also regarded in high respect for their meats cooked slowly. These 3 types are copied many times by Pakistani restaurants, while basically originated or perfected in India in the cities or places mentioned.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndianBoyz View Post

Sikhs are not allowed to eat halal meat.

Tandoori style chicken for instance was invented by a Hindu Punjabi called Gujral who cooked meats in the clay oven instead of the usualy flat breads. This is a very popular dish in the USA while curries are most popular in the UK. Also curries are typical Indian dishes and have not been introduced by 'foreigners' in history.

Now, the Indian style from Hyderabad and the Mughlai cuisine are very popular in the west. Both cuisines reached their peak in India. Sure Mughal style cuisine was introduced by central Asians but Indian style spices were added, and their culinary level reached their peaks in India. Then there's a similar style which is called Awadhi cuisine from the city of Lucknow which is also regarded in high respect for their meats cooked slowly. These 3 types are copied many times by Pakistani restaurants, while basically originated or perfected in India in the cities or places mentioned.

I have no arguments with your history, just saying that I have been more impressed by restaurants claiming to cook either in the Pakistani (esp Lahori) style or the Mughlai style (which also has a Muslim heritage) than restaurants associated with any other part of the Subcontinent. South Asian is far and away my favorite ethnic cuisine, and I make a point of checking out the top South Asian spots, high end and low end, in any city I visit. I haven't had anything as delicious as Tayyabs orLahore Kabab House in London, and the closest are a few Pakistani taxi driver takeaways in SF, NYC, and Chicago. Just my humble opinion.
post #18 of 20
The top UK South Asian restaurants are run by Indians, but hey, if you like Lahori food, good for you. Pakistani food has not Muslim heritage besides the obvious Mughal style influence. Basically there isn't much difference, but you seem to be a muslim ofcourse you're going to favour them as you need to eat halal food.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndianBoyz View Post

The top UK South Asian restaurants are run by Indians, but hey, if you like Lahori food, good for you. Pakistani food has not Muslim heritage besides the obvious Mughal style influence. Basically there isn't much difference, but you seem to be a muslim ofcourse you're going to favour them as you need to eat halal food.

Have some Muslim blood but not South Asian, and don't care about Halal or not. Just stating my opinions on the best South Asian food I've tried. What are the "top UK South Asian restaurants" in your view? I guess the Michelin starred ones (Amaya, Tamarind, etc) are probably Indian-owned, but frankly I find posh Indian food to be really boring. The cuisine is just not suited to that sort of presentation (Oysters with curry sauce, etc).

The best Indian restaurants IMO are the vegetarian ones (paneer, dal, spinach, eggplant) or street food ones (dosas, chat, samosas). Also, Indian places tend to be better at creamy sauces like Chicken Makhni, but I'm not a fan of those dishes in any event.
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SantosLHalper View Post

I've had great success with Classic Indian Cooking by Julie Sahni. Not much experience with the Jaffrey books, but friends have recommended them as well.

I have the Sahni book and it is great, only thing is it focuses more on Northern Indian cuisine which is quite different from Southern. I prefer the searing hotness of the southern Indian cuisine. I have one of Jaffrey's books and it is great, because it has dishes by region, so you can see how the flavors vary around the country. My favorite is a South Indian cookbook though, forget the name. If you are wanting to try a sampling of different regions, go with one of Jaffrey's for starters.
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