or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › What Kwilk Learned At Culinary School Today.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What Kwilk Learned At Culinary School Today. - Page 51

post #751 of 764
Thread Starter 
Reviving this thread because today was too cool to not talk about.
We had an extra day in the curriculum, so instead of cooking today, we decided to take a field trip down to China town.
It was so much fun.
We got off the subway and went straight into a market. This market was full of interesting things. A lot of stuff I've never seen (or heard of, really), and a ton of Hello Kitty candy
Here was the live seafood tank:


The view of one of the main strips in Chinatown:




Just absolutely full of market after market after market. It was very cool to see.
We went into a little strip mall area behind this main drag and went into a couple of specialty Chinese medicine stores. Saw all kinds of stuff I'd never seen before. Dried shrimp, dried scallops, dried ablone (for $1200 a pound holy shit!) deer penis (yes, deer penis), bird's nest, and other things. Just really interesting to see this stuff.




All the dried deer stuff:



"White Fungus," basically a dried mushroom. A bunch of other mushrooms, too.






And the winner winner chicken dinner of the day: Super Placenta


Then we went into another market. Snapped some more pics.
Head on shrimp


And all kinds of fresh seafood stuff




And this huge mofo of a fish.



Then we went to lunch at Lao Sze Chuan
Started off with the complimentary spicy cabbage and tea


Then came out the egg rolls


And the hot and sour soup:


The first thing I noticed about the soup was how unctuous it was. I really started to understand what Vox was explaining about Chinese cuisine w/ this. There was so much body, so many full flavors, so strong flavors. It tasted different from most hot/sour soups you get where the ingredients are thrown together and simmered for 20 minutes. This felt like it had hours of work behind it. There was just so much body to it. Very thick. A lot of umami.

Then we got Governor's Chicken at the place. This was your more Americanized version of Chinese food. It was good, though.


Lastly, and for the more traditional Chinese cuisine, I got Pork's Stomach.


This was very good. It was a little chewy, but the flavor was great, and a bit spicy. Really incredible dish.


Overall, today gave me a real appreciation for Chinese culture. I didn't know much about it before this, but I think I started to get a feel for it. I really enjoyed it. The Chinese people seem to be much more in touch with their food than the typical American is. In a way, they seemed more in touch with themselves. It was a really great experience today. Much better way to get a feel for the cuisine than what we've been doing in this class.
post #752 of 764
All of those are commonplace for me and where I live (in a very chinese-concentrated part of the city... locals would know where I'm talkin about). It's cool to see a "gwai-lo" culinary perspective of it :P As a kid, I always used to sneak into my dad's (the main cook of the family.. at least when it comes to traditional chinese) cabinet and grab a dried scallop to munch on. They start off hard, but then once it softens up it begins getting chewy with a mild briny/seafoody taste. Just thinking out loud here (and not sure if I am expressing myself too coherently), I realize that where a dish in most cuisines there is a central "ingredient", that is enhanced with others via sauces etc., in chinese cuisine the dish is an 'entity' in itself, comprised of many ingredients, none of which stand out as the "main" ingredient... Just talking out my ass here, I may be way off base. If you can find it, I recommend trying preserved-egg and lean-pork congee (that's the literal translation, not sure if theres an americanized name for it). That, topped with sliced green onion and a generous serving of chinese donut to dip, will warm you right up from the inside on a cold chi-town day.
post #753 of 764
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Reviving this thread because today was too cool to not talk about.
We had an extra day in the curriculum, so instead of cooking today, we decided to take a field trip down to China town.
It was so much fun.
We got off the subway and went straight into a market. This market was full of interesting things. A lot of stuff I've never seen (or heard of, really), and a ton of Hello Kitty candy
Here was the live seafood tank:



Then we went to lunch at Lao Sze Chuan
The first thing I noticed about the soup was how unctuous it was. I really started to understand what Vox was explaining about Chinese cuisine w/ this. There was so much body, so many full flavors, so strong flavors. It tasted different from most hot/sour soups you get where the ingredients are thrown together and simmered for 20 minutes. This felt like it had hours of work behind it. There was just so much body to it. Very thick. A lot of umami.

Then we got Governor's Chicken at the place. This was your more Americanized version of Chinese food. It was good, though.

Lastly, and for the more traditional Chinese cuisine, I got Pork's Stomach.

This was very good. It was a little chewy, but the flavor was great, and a bit spicy. Really incredible dish.

The frightening thing about that particular market you are standing in is what happens when you buy a live fish. They proceed to beat the crap out of it with a worn out 2x4. Clubbing a live fish seems like a reasonable enough action but the piece of wood they were using looked like a health hazard of sorts...

I'll have to try their hot and sour soup, it sounds good. I think you missed out with the governors chicken though...they have better more authentic pieces that fit the same set of tastes (not made with "weird" food and not spicy).
post #754 of 764
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonick View Post
All of those are commonplace for me and where I live (in a very chinese-concentrated part of the city... locals would know where I'm talkin about). It's cool to see a "gwai-lo" culinary perspective of it :P

As a kid, I always used to sneak into my dad's (the main cook of the family.. at least when it comes to traditional chinese) cabinet and grab a dried scallop to munch on. They start off hard, but then once it softens up it begins getting chewy with a mild briny/seafoody taste.

Just thinking out loud here (and not sure if I am expressing myself too coherently), I realize that where a dish in most cuisines there is a central "ingredient", that is enhanced with others via sauces etc., in chinese cuisine the dish is an 'entity' in itself, comprised of many ingredients, none of which stand out as the "main" ingredient... Just talking out my ass here, I may be way off base.

If you can find it, I recommend trying preserved-egg and lean-pork congee (that's the literal translation, not sure if theres an americanized name for it). That, topped with sliced green onion and a generous serving of chinese donut to dip, will warm you right up from the inside on a cold chi-town day.
Yes, I entirely agree with what you said about Chinese food. There seems to be very little flavor that stood out as a single flavor. Rather, they all worked together to make a really harmonious dish. I supposed that goes along w/ the concept of the yin and the yang, where everything is in balance. I really enjoyed it. A dish wasn't salty or spicy, it was.... everything. And really good, too. I'll stay on the lookout for the congee stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post
The frightening thing about that particular market you are standing in is what happens when you buy a live fish. They proceed to beat the crap out of it with a worn out 2x4. Clubbing a live fish seems like a reasonable enough action but the piece of wood they were using looked like a health hazard of sorts...

I'll have to try their hot and sour soup, it sounds good. I think you missed out with the governors chicken though...they have better more authentic pieces that fit the same set of tastes (not made with "weird" food and not spicy).

That doesn't sound good with the fish lol.
I should have gone for something other than the Governor's Chicken, but I wanted some pussy Americanese food, in case I didn't enjoy the Pork Stomach.

Today was Thailand. We made Son in Law Eggs (traditional name was Kai Look Koei, I think). For some reason, I think I've heard DarkNWorn talk aboutt his dish before. Maybe I was wrong. Anyway, hard boiled eggs that are then deep fried and served w/ rice and two kinds of sauces.
post #755 of 764
Mind explaining the sauces further? I might like to give that a try
post #756 of 764
So you just boil then deep fry the eggs? How did they taste? Any pre fry seasoning?
post #757 of 764
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post
Mind explaining the sauces further? I might like to give that a try
One of the sauces is made of tamarind paste, palm sugar, fish sauce, and thai bird chilies. The other is made of sambal, palm sugar, lime juice, and fish sauce. I'd start with about equal parts of each, and then taste it until you get a good balance of flavors. You should be able to distinctly taste each flavor, hot, sour, salty, sweet, but none of these should overpower any of the others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jpeirpont View Post
So you just boil then deep fry the eggs? How did they taste? Any pre fry seasoning?

Yep, just boiled and then deep fried. Taste great, really. No seasoning before you fry. Just pull them out of the fryer and toss them whole in the sauce. The sauce should season them pretty well. Then you pull them out of the sauce, split them, and plate them.
post #758 of 764
^ Next time you are in that complex, go to the King bbq house for the best roast duck in Chicago.
post #759 of 764
Saw this and thought of Kwilk - dude, hope you don't mind it in your thread. Just shows what a little plating (and almost complete 'reconstruction') can do:

This: http://s3.amazonaws.com/data.tumblr....yzBuAClmXNc%3D

Is a Wendy's baconator:
http://www.fancyfastfood.com/page/1

Anyhow, thought the food-interested might find this fun.
post #760 of 764
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duveen View Post
Saw this and thought of Kwilk - dude, hope you don't mind it in your thread. Just shows what a little plating (and almost complete 'reconstruction') can do:

This: http://s3.amazonaws.com/data.tumblr....yzBuAClmXNc%3D

Is a Wendy's baconator:
http://www.fancyfastfood.com/page/1

Anyhow, thought the food-interested might find this fun.

That looks like something they serve on a cruise ship.
post #761 of 764
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duveen View Post

Is a Wendy's baconator:
http://www.fancyfastfood.com/page/1

Anyhow, thought the food-interested might find this fun.

That's awesome! Dude's got some skillz. I wonder what he can do with a pile of fresh turd.
post #762 of 764
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
That looks like something they serve on a cruise ship.

I agree, the plating is pretty darn 80s. But I thought it was a fun idea.

BTW, they take submissions, so if you want to offer up a more au courant re-plating of trash food, you should do so. I bet they would publish it!
post #763 of 764
Kyle I Want Pictures Of Ur Creashuns.
post #764 of 764
Super Placenta really isn't worth the premium you pay over regular.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › What Kwilk Learned At Culinary School Today.