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post #31 of 46
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On another note, is eLuxury discounted? I'm just browsing the LV stuff and I can't seem to find any discounted prices. If not, I cant see why people would utilize it, I think the best reason to pay full retail is to receive the service and experience of luxury shopping.
There is also no tax online (yet). On an 18,000 dollar trunk, or even a 700 dollar bag, tax certainly adds up. Dan
post #32 of 46
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I worked with someone who was previously in charge of a major consumer products company's Asian operations, and one of the brands that they managed was Ray-ban.  He went into a boutique in Shanghai and saw replicas that were identical to their current products (which were manufactured in China)  Obviously since they had the specifications they just made more than Ray-ban asked for and sold the others as "replicas" even though they were basically originals.  They went as far as designing THEIR OWN Ray-ban sunglasses that were completely unique, and selling them in the same boutique, of course, all made with the same materials as the Ray-ban glasses, and sold for a fraction of the price.
In my experience, the 1st part of what you note is quie common. For example, see the old North Face thread.
post #33 of 46
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eluxury is not discounted, it's full price.  I imagine the reason you'd want to order is if you don't have a LV boutique in your city, or if they don't have what you're looking for in stock.
I would also imagine that buying things on the internet would be a better distribution channel to reach potential male consumers, even if he lived near a boutique.
post #34 of 46
That could be, although personally I like going in the South Coast LV as you never know who you will run into. Last time I was in there (couple weeks ago) we saw Karl Malone and his wife.
post #35 of 46
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I worked with someone who was previously in charge of a major consumer products company's Asian operations, and one of the brands that they managed was Ray-ban.  He went into a boutique in Shanghai and saw replicas that were identical to their current products (which were manufactured in China)  Obviously since they had the specifications they just made more than Ray-ban asked for and sold the others as "replicas" even though they were basically originals.  They went as far as designing THEIR OWN Ray-ban sunglasses that were completely unique, and selling them in the same boutique, of course, all made with the same materials as the Ray-ban glasses, and sold for a fraction of the price.
I'm fascinated by this subject - particularly what you have said about the Shanghai Ray-bans.  What constitutes a fake?  I've been in countless boutiques, in Hangzhou, Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu, and I see the same Ralph Lauren Polos everywhere.  They look just like the original.  They sell for about 80 kuai (ten dollars) after the pitiful haggling of a Westerner.  Are these real and licensed by RL, extras produced without RL's permission by his suppliers, or extras that had some flaw - perhaps basically unnoticeable - that prevented them from being exported?  In the same shops I have seen shirts, sweaters, etc. from Banana Republic, J. Crew, and other inexpensive brands that it wouldn't seem worthwhile to counterfeit.  These must be pieces slated for export that just didn't make it.  In a neighboring store on Wulin St. (the "it" street in Hangzhou, I suggest that all forum members to take a visit to ridicule the quite vigorous, and quite bellbottomed, attempts made by young Chinese men at being chic) I encountered a gorgeous "Marc Jacobs" silk dress, with good quality, gorgeous fabric, and countless details.  My girlfriend bought it along with two lovely Katherine Malandrino dresses.  All of this came to 650 kuai after bargaining.  She also bought some Burberry pants for 200 kuai.  None of these items were produced in bulk.  Clearly fakes, but what level fake?  From the same factory, from designers inspired by the designers whose labels they took, or simply exact fakes of real pieces?  If it is the final option, it hardly seems worthwhile to produce such unique pieces and in such low quantities?   It's funny.  All of Wulin Lu has this sort of "brandname" stuff.  I can ask the same question about Thailand which is saturated with Diesel and Energie.  If you like either of these brands take a trip, because what they have there is far more visually appealing than the street-wear harshness these brands offer in their boutiques in the States.  You can get gorgeous cotton "Energie" summer shirts for a mere 3 dollars, without bargaining.  Also, Thailand is the place for inexpensive tailoring, and a much better place than any other in the world, but that is another thing...
post #36 of 46
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(drizzt3117 @ Mar. 01 2005,13:34) I worked with someone who was previously in charge of a major consumer products company's Asian operations, and one of the brands that they managed was Ray-ban.  He went into a boutique in Shanghai and saw replicas that were identical to their current products (which were manufactured in China)  Obviously since they had the specifications they just made more than Ray-ban asked for and sold the others as "replicas" even though they were basically originals.  They went as far as designing THEIR OWN Ray-ban sunglasses that were completely unique, and selling them in the same boutique, of course, all made with the same materials as the Ray-ban glasses, and sold for a fraction of the price.
I'm fascinated by this subject - particularly what you have said about the Shanghai Ray-bans.  What constitutes a fake?  I've been in countless boutiques, in Hangzhou, Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu, and I see the same Ralph Lauren Polos everywhere.  They look just like the original.  They sell for about 80 kuai (ten dollars) after the pitiful haggling of a Westerner.  Are these real and licensed by RL, extras produced without RL's permission by his suppliers, or extras that had some flaw - perhaps basically unnoticeable - that prevented them from being exported?  In the same shops I have seen shirts, sweaters, etc. from Banana Republic, J. Crew, and other inexpensive brands that it wouldn't seem worthwhile to counterfeit.  These must be pieces slated for export that just didn't make it.  In a neighboring store on Wulin St. (the "it" street in Hangzhou, I suggest that all forum members to take a visit to ridicule the quite vigorous, and quite bellbottomed, attempts made by young Chinese men at being chic) I encountered a gorgeous "Marc Jacobs" silk dress, with good quality, gorgeous fabric, and countless details.  My girlfriend bought it along with two lovely Katherine Malandrino dresses.  All of this came to 650 kuai after bargaining.  She also bought some Burberry pants for 200 kuai.  None of these items were produced in bulk.  Clearly fakes, but what level fake?  From the same factory, from designers inspired by the designers whose labels they took, or simply exact fakes of real pieces?  If it is the final option, it hardly seems worthwhile to produce such unique pieces and in such low quantities?   It's funny.  All of Wulin Lu has this sort of "brandname" stuff.  I can ask the same question about Thailand which is saturated with Diesel and Energie.  If you like either of these brands take a trip, because what they have there is far more visually appealing than the street-wear harshness these brands offer in their boutiques in the States.  You can get gorgeous cotton "Energie" summer shirts for a mere 3 dollars, without bargaining.  Also, Thailand is the place for inexpensive tailoring, and a much better place than any other in the world, but that is another thing...
There was a lot of Marks & Spenser stuff floating around there at one time. Also, as to products that don't appear to be worth copying or selling or picking up after having fallen off the truck -- a lot of people will do anything for a buck. You know the bottles of water with the kid on them? I think he's some sort of pop star or something? Well, you'll have guys who will spend an hour trying to glue the cap to the seal onto the bottle in order to make far less than a kuai reselling it.
post #37 of 46
As Horace said, I think it's a combination of both things that were produced in excess of requested manufacture quality, and "inspired" designs from the same factory, with obvious reverse engineering attempts. One caveat, as it seems neither of you are native Mandarin speakers, I'd like to point out that the word "kuai" as it is, refers to a local monetary unit, not the Chinese Yuan specifically, as if I were to go to a store in the US and saw something priced at $100, it'd still be referred to as 100 "kuai" It's probably better to refer to it specifically as a "yuan" although I had a professor at my MBA program who would consistently call the currency a "reminbi" which is way too formal and not used in everyday speech. "len min bi" is Mandarin for (loosely translated) "The People's Dollar" and is just communist rhetoric.
post #38 of 46
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simply exact fakes of real pieces?
Yep. This are the more expensive (call A quality) fakes. The "A" accesories are incredible - good leather (or whatever materials, all details correct, etc... On some stuff, you'd literally have to rip open the product to know the auhentic from the fake product. I've heard that the fake Tod's bags are just amazing - evne better than the real thing.
post #39 of 46
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As Horace said, I think it's a combination of both things that were produced in excess of requested manufacture quality, and "inspired" designs from the same factory, with obvious reverse engineering attempts.   One caveat, as it seems neither of you are native Mandarin speakers, I'd like to point out that the word "kuai" as it is, refers to a local monetary unit, not the Chinese Yuan specifically, as if I were to go to a store in the US and saw something priced at $100, it'd still be referred to as 100 "kuai"  It's probably better to refer to it specifically as a "yuan" although I had a professor at my MBA program who would consistently call the currency a "reminbi" which is way too formal and not used in everyday speech. "len min bi" is Mandarin for (loosely translated) "The People's Dollar" and is just communist rhetoric.
ûû£¬ Äã½ÌÃËÎÒÕâéµ¥´ÊµÄº¬Òå¡£ ÎÒÒÔÇ°¶¼²»Ì«Çå³þ¡£ ÎÒÊǸö´ó±¿µ°£¬ Ò²ÊǸöÒ°ÂùÈË¡£ Thanks for telling me the difference between ÈËÃñ±Ò£¬ Ôª£¬ and ¿é¡£ This was too ambiguous. We may have been talking about dollars when I used the word "kuai" in English to refer to money I paid while in China.
post #40 of 46
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ûû£¬ Äã½ÌÃËÎÒÕâéµ¥´ÊµÄº¬Òå¡£ ÎÒÒÔÇ°¶¼²»Ì«Çå³þ¡£ ÎÒÊǸö´ó±¿µ°£¬ Ò²ÊǸöÒ°ÂùÈË¡£
Those squiggles were not meant to be Chinese, but Goblin. Please don't try to claim superior knowledge of that tongue.
post #41 of 46
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Quote (Lydia @ Mar. 04 2005,12:49) ûû£¬ Äã½ÌÃËÎÒÕâéµ¥´ÊµÄº¬Òå¡£ ÎÒÒÔÇ°¶¼²»Ì«Çå³þ¡£ ÎÒÊǸö´ó±¿µ°£¬ Ò²ÊǸöÒ°ÂùÈË¡£ Those squiggles were not meant to be Chinese, but Goblin.  Please don't try to claim superior knowledge of that tongue.
It sounds best in the original Klingon. This is all very interesting. I was planning a trip to SE Asia partly for the purposes of checking out the garment industry there, but it was postponed due to an upcoming trip to Japan. But armed with some more knowledge and a big pile of spec'd out designs, perhaps I will prepare for a trip to Thailand in the more distant future. How is the local selection of fabrics? I have heard that less scrupulous tailors will represent wool blends as pure wool, and fake LP, etc. Is one best off bringing his own fabric?
post #42 of 46
Go to Singer's on Delancy St. in the Lower East Side. You can get really top-notch stuff there. Loro Piana, Zegna, etc at deeply discounted prices. He supplied the fabric for the Aviator. Just talking to the guy is worth what you will pay for the fabric. He's one of the last great Jewish discount fabric merchants in that area. Take his fabric to Thailand, which is much cheaper than HK. Bring an excellent model that you want to have duplicated. This is my plan, which I will execute when I have the funds. His fabrics are really superior, but you can get okay stuff in the far east, if you aren't terribly picky. They all claim to be wool or even cashmere, but god knows. Some of the wool seems pretty good, as far as I am concerned. I've taken stuff I had made in China to have it checked by fabric sellers here, and they say you can't tell what the exact composition is-without tests.
post #43 of 46
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Go to Singer's on Delancy St. in the Lower East Side.  You can get really top-notch stuff there.  Loro Piana, Zegna, etc at deeply discounted prices.  He supplied the fabric for the Aviator.  Just talking to the guy is worth what you will pay for the fabric.  He's one of the last great Jewish discount fabric merchants in that area.  Take his fabric to Thailand, which is much cheaper than HK.  Bring an excellent model that you want to have duplicated.  This is my plan, which I will execute when I have the funds.      His fabrics are really superior, but you can get okay stuff in the far east, if you aren't terribly picky.  They all claim to be wool or even cashmere, but god knows.  Some of the wool seems pretty good, as far as I am concerned.  I've taken stuff I had made in China to have it checked by fabric sellers here, and they say you can't tell what the exact composition is-without tests.
I guess my tests would be, does it look good, does it breathe, does it hold its shape, does it drape well, does it pill... To be honest I don't care what it's made of if it passes these tests.
post #44 of 46
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As Horace said, I think it's a combination of both things that were produced in excess of requested manufacture quality, and "inspired" designs from the same factory, with obvious reverse engineering attempts.   One caveat, as it seems neither of you are native Mandarin speakers, I'd like to point out that the word "kuai" as it is, refers to a local monetary unit, not the Chinese Yuan specifically, as if I were to go to a store in the US and saw something priced at $100, it'd still be referred to as 100 "kuai"  It's probably better to refer to it specifically as a "yuan" although I had a professor at my MBA program who would consistently call the currency a "reminbi" which is way too formal and not used in everyday speech. "len min bi" is Mandarin for (loosely translated) "The People's Dollar" and is just communist rhetoric.
I am not a native speaker. But yuan and kuai are often interchangeable, in my experience. I've heard kuai used to refer to US Dollars, but it might more usefully be translated as "bucks" or "quid". But I simply used the same language as the poster previous.
post #45 of 46
They'll be interchangable if you're in China, but my point is that kuai is not the official name of the Chinese currency, but merely a placeholder for said official name. If you are in the EU, kuai will mean Euros, in the UK, pounds, and so on.
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