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Groupthink or Connoisseurs' Consensus? - Page 2

post #16 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Can the snarky jerks whose IQs exceed 80 (you know who you are) please try to say something substantive?

I think that "Connoisseurs' Consensus" would be a splendid name for cat food.

In contrast, "Groupthink" might work for a swingers affinity site.

In either case, I would expect grimslade to be an early adopter.


- B
post #17 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
I think that "Connoisseurs' Consensus" would be a splendid name for cat food.

In contrast, "Groupthink" might work for a swingers affinity site.

In either case, I would expect grimslade to be an early adopter.


- B

If your hot wife joins, count me in.
post #18 of 440
Thread Starter 
Is it automatically groupthink if you discover something you like through the Internet?

For years, I did not like knit ties. I associated them with junior high teachers and with the cheap ones my dad used to wear in the '70. Exposure to really nice knit ties on SF changed my mind.

Was I just succumbing to "groupthink"?

We have probably all tried food that we either feared we would hate, or simply had never thought of before. Then we go out to dinner with seven other people who love it, order a big plate, encourage us to try, and we find that we like it. Is that also "groupthink"?

"Groupthink" is such an all-purpose insult, especially on the FNB forum, that I am trying to see if it has any content beyond "We don't like those guys."

That and I am trying to see if the hard-core Cruserian satorial relativism that now definess AAAC has any following here.
post #19 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by zjpj83 View Post
I disagree that you have to have personal experience with something in order to be an enthusiast and have a great deal of knowledge thereof. Many car historians, for instance, who know more than anyone about the history of classic 1960s Ferraris, don't actually own one. I can know that a canvased jacket is nicer than a fused jacket without having to own a canvased jacket.

I said "or critical thinking". One can evaluate without direct personal experience.
post #20 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Can the snarky jerks whose IQs exceed 80 (you know who you are) please try to say something substantive?
Sweet, the "you have to be taller than this line to ride" rule doesn't apply to me on this one.
post #21 of 440
What does Cruiserism/Sartorial Relativism have to do with Groupthink. Those are two different issues. There is plenty of the latter, though, for reasons given by others, including you, it isn't always a bad thing. As for the former, there is plenty of that here to. It is nice how the different taste groupings with MC (I am not even including Streetwear) can co-exist perfectly well and even contribute to each others' experience. A big reason for that is there are fewer Cruiser-like boors. Another reason is that when they do pop up, they either get run out of town by the screaming mob or else are moderated into oblivion.
post #22 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Is it automatically groupthink if you discover something you like through the Internet?

For years, I did not like knit ties. I associated them with junior high teachers and with the cheap ones my dad used to wear in the '70. Exposure to really nice knit ties on SF changed my mind.

Was I just succumbing to "groupthink"?

We have probably all tried food that we either feared we would hate, or simply had never thought of before. Then we go out to dinner with seven other people who love it, order a big plate, encourage us to try, and we find that we like it. Is that also "groupthink"?

"Groupthink" is such an all-purpose insult, especially on the FNB forum, that I am trying to see if it has any content beyond "We don't like those guys."

That and I am trying to see if the hard-core Cruserian satorial relativism that now definess AAAC has any following here.

If everyone here grew up and lived in a cave, we would wear loin cloths, not suits. OBVIOUSLY, we all take our style, our likes and dislikes, from what we see around us. I wouldn't know about certain brands or styles without the internet. But liking something to which someone is exposed as a result of the internet and liking it simply because it is on the internet are two very different things. I didn't know what a beveled waist was 5 years ago. But I like it now because I have come to understand it and like its intrinsic qualities, NOT because it was posited as something that I should like. If I buy a car because I have read great reviews, do I buy it simply because those reviews exist, or because their assessments were true? Obviously the latter.
post #23 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJmanbearpig View Post
I said "or critical thinking". One can evaluate without direct personal experience.

How can you, across the interweb cyberspace, assess whether someone has "critically thought" about an issue? Seriously, I'd love to know. I like Edward Green top drawer shoes and have recommended them to a friend. I do not yet own any myself. So, did I endorse the brand with or without "critical thinking," Monsieur RJ? You tell me.
post #24 of 440
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
What does Cruiserism/Sartorial Relativism have to do with Groupthink.

He claims that opposition to his "ideas" and widespread preferences for things he does not like is groupthink. I can't recall if he used the term, but that was the thrust of a few of his posts.
post #25 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by zjpj83 View Post
How can you, across the interweb cyberspace, assess whether someone has "critically thought" about an issue? Seriously, I'd love to know. I like Edward Green top drawer shoes and have recommended them to a friend. I do not yet own any myself. So, did I endorse the brand with or without "critical thinking," Monsieur RJ? You tell me.
Don't Cruiserfy me. Sheesh.
post #26 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
He claims that opposition to his "ideas" and widespread preferences for things he does not like is groupthink. I can't recall if he used the term, but that was the thrust of a few of his posts.

I don't know if there is such a thing as the "arguing from the opposite of authority" fallacy, but if there is, you just employed it.
post #27 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Is it automatically groupthink if you discover something you like through the Internet?

For years, I did not like knit ties. I associated them with junior high teachers and with the cheap ones my dad used to wear in the '70. Exposure to really nice knit ties on SF changed my mind.

Was I just succumbing to "groupthink"?

We have probably all tried food that we either feared we would hate, or simply had never thought of before. Then we go out to dinner with seven other people who love it, order a big plate, encourage us to try, and we find that we like it. Is that also "groupthink"?

"Groupthink" is such an all-purpose insult, especially on the FNB forum, that I am trying to see if it has any content beyond "We don't like those guys."

That and I am trying to see if the hard-core Cruserian satorial relativism that now definess AAAC has any following here.

My elementary school music teacher wore knit ties that were kind of spongy; my friends and I used to pull the tie and let go to see it hit him in the face (he was a bit nerdy, or perhaps a pervy!). To this day that is the image that comes to my mind whenever I see knit ties....
post #28 of 440
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
I don't know if there is such a thing as the "arguing from the opposite of authority" fallacy, but if there is, you just employed it.

I am not passing judgement either way (though you can guess what I think). I am just asking if his claim has any validity.
post #29 of 440
I think that there is groupthink here. The result is that everybody goes out and buys a couple of knit ties. Some people like them, and the groupthink has helped move them forward and interest them in new things that broaden their "sartorial horizons" and other people hate them and put them on B&S. In that way, the groupthink is generally a positive. Clearly there are some things that are generally liked, but I imagine that is because they are harmonious.
post #30 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
. . . I am just asking if his claim has any validity.

The question contains its answer.
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